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Databases – Infrastructure – Security

Brian Kelley is an author, columnist, and Microsoft SQL Server MVP focusing primarily on SQL Server security. He is a contributing author for How to Cheat at Securing SQL Server 2005 (Syngress), Professional SQL Server 2008 Administration (Wrox), and Introduction to SQL Server (Texas Publishing). Brian currently serves as an infrastructure and security architect. He has also served as a senior Microsoft SQL Server DBA, database architect, developer, and incident response team lead.

Archives: March 2014

Speaking at Midlands PASS Chapter tonight

The Midlands PASS Chapter is an official PASS (Professional Association for SQL Server) chapter located in Columbia, SC. It’s free to attend our meetings, which are typically held the 2nd Thursday of each month.

Once a year we like to do an open forum on SQL Server security. It’s typically… Read more

0 comments, 142 reads

Posted in Databases – Infrastructure – Security on 13 March 2014

A summary of the SQL Server security #datachat is live

Recently I posted about participating in a #datachat about SQL Server security. As it turned out, we didn’t talk about SQL Server security, but data security. It was a good discussion with quite a few knowledgeable folks joining in. A summary of the discussion including some highlighted tweets can… Read more

0 comments, 180 reads

Posted in Databases – Infrastructure – Security on 12 March 2014

Auditing VMware vCenter Actions (on SQL Server)

When you’ve got a SIEM appliance or application, you want actions and events going into it as a central repository. That allows you to see patterns and hopefully track incidents across systems. As a result, if you want to track actions in VMware’s vCenter and you’ve got the database hosted… Read more

0 comments, 330 reads

Posted in Databases – Infrastructure – Security on 7 March 2014

The weakest link in database security

The weakest link in database security is the same as for most all IT security: people.

Because the weakest link is always people, we have adopted a principle called The Principle of Least Privilege to determine how we should assign security. If you’ve never heard of it, it’s a basic… Read more

1 comments, 260 reads

Posted in Databases – Infrastructure – Security on 6 March 2014