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K. Brian Kelley - Databases, Infrastructure, and Security

IT Security, MySQL, Perl, SQL Server, and Windows technologies.

New MySQL Entry Level Certification

Last week I received an email indicating that MySQL had made available an entry level certification, the Certified MySQL Associate. The idea is to provide a certification which shows a person has some basic knowledge of MySQL, but not at the level of a developer or DBA. That's a great idea.

Not everyone needs a developer's or DBA's knowledge of a product to make use of it. This is true whether we're talking about MySQL or SQL Server. After all, we don't expect an end user to know how to fully administer a Windows XP / Vista system, but the basics of how to use it, that's well within the bounds of expectations.

I haven't had time to pursue a MySQL certification, mainly because of work and professional activities. However, this may be one worth studying for because it's not as intensive as the other two, and will allow me to validate to myself that I have at least a passing knowledge of how to use MySQL.

Technorati Tags: MySQL | Certification | CMA | Certified MySQL Associate | Work | Skills

Comments

Posted by Roland Bouman on 18 July 2007
Hi Brian,

I am so glad you like this idea ;)

"Not everyone needs a developer's or DBA's knowledge of a product to make use of it."

Indeed - we all have had to start some where, and the associate exam is meant to be a stepping stone. For example, I think the associate exam is a great way for say PHP application developers to prove that they have at least the essential SQL skills to be truly succesful in (MySQL) database application development.

Later, when you find you are doing more and more with MySQL, you can of course still attain MySQL Developer or DBA certification.

"However, this may be one worth studying for because it's not as intensive as the other two, and will allow me to validate to myself that I have at least a passing knowledge of how to use MySQL."

Depends on what you mean by intensive. It is certainly true that the Associate exam is more focused. It is especially focussed on the MySQL SQL language, and a few key tools like the mysql command line client program. But it does indeed not delve into the nitty gritty details of performance tuning, replication, or the different installation procedures on Linux.

Another thing is that of course, there are less questions in the Associate exam than in the regular DBA and DEV exams (50 instead of 70), and also, the Associate certification is attained by passing just one exam whereas both the DEV and DBA certification consist of two exams (Part I and Part II)

The associate exam will also be offered at a much lower price than the regular DBA and DEV exams, and this makes it an excellent choice for those people that have the basic knowledge and moderate experience using MySQL. Also, those people that are not really confident whether they are completely up to DEV or DBA certification can use this as a lakmus test - if you don't pass the associate exam, it is almost certainly not a good idea to try to do the DEV and DBA exams because it is extremely likely you will fail those too.

kind regards,

Roland Bouman
Posted by K. Brian Kelley on 18 July 2007
Hi Roland,

it's a great idea, to have this level of exam, something I wish some other vendors (*cough* Microsoft *cough*) would adopt. As far as "intensive" goes, I didn't do a good job of explaining what I meant, did I? But you've hit the gist of my intent: you show you know the core functionality with this exam.

The price break is also a nice difference, because you're right, it allows a candidate to verify at least a minimal level before trying the more extensive (and expensive) exams.
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