Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 

Basit's SQL Server Tips

Basit Farooq is a Lead Database Administrator, Trainer and Technical Author. He has more than a decade of IT experience in development, technical training and database administration on Microsoft SQL Server platforms. Basit has authored numerous SQL Server technical articles, and developed and implemented many successful database infrastructure, data warehouse and business intelligence projects. He holds a master's degree in computer science from London Metropolitan University, and industry standard certifications from Microsoft, Sun, Cisco, Brainbench, Prosoft and APM, including MCITP Database Administrator 2008, MCITP Database Administrator 2005, MCDBA SQL Server 2000 and MCTS .NET Framework 2.0 Web Applications.

Guide to SQL Server Table Indexes (Part 1)

One of the most important tasks for every database administrator (DBA) is to ensure that query times are consistent with service-level agreement (SLAs) or within user expectations. One of the most effective techniques to achieve this objective is to create indexes on tables for your queries. SQL Server uses indexes to sort and organize table data. It creates indexes based on ordering values from one or more selected columns. SQL Server automatically creates indexes when you define a primary key or unique constraint. You can use indexes to manage and track rows in a table or an indexed view.

Indexes improve the performance on most data scans by reducing the overall time query takes to run and the amount of work and resources it consumes. The amount of performance improvement depends on the size of the tables involved, the index design, and the type of query. You can see the role of indexes by observing what happens during queries and data manipulation.

Checkout the part-1 of my five part article series on Guide to SQL Server Table Indexes here, in which you’ll learn about the basics of SQL Server database table’s indexes, the difference between the clustered and non-clustered indexes, and how the leaf nodes, non-leaf nodes, and heaps associated with data storage.

This article is published on SQL-SERVER-PERFORMANCE.COM.


Comments

Leave a comment on the original post [basitaalishan.com, opens in a new window]

Loading comments...