SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 

TempDB growth due to version store on AlwaysOn secondary server

By Ramya Makam,

Introduction

On a not-so-busy day, I received an alert saying tempdb was at 90 percent of the drive size with only 10 percent remaining. This was a SQL Server 2014 instance hosting AlwaysOn secondary databases.

Explanation

I logged onto the server to check what was running in tempdb. Everything looked normal, and the daily routine queries were running. I checked memory and the CPU, both were fine but the tempdb kept filling. After a while, I ran the below query to see the tempdb space usage.

SELECT GETDATE() AS runtime,
    SUM(user_object_reserved_page_count) * 8 AS usr_obj_kb,
    SUM(internal_object_reserved_page_count) * 8 AS internal_obj_kb,
    SUM(version_store_reserved_page_count) * 8 AS version_store_kb,
    SUM(unallocated_extent_page_count) * 8 AS freespace_kb,
    SUM(mixed_extent_page_count) * 8 AS mixedextent_kb
FROM sys.dm_db_file_space_usage;

Here are my results:

Note: There are many AlwaysON secondary databases hosted on this server and all the queries that run against the secondary databases are automatically mapped to the snapshot isolation transaction level. The snapshot isolation level copies row versions into tempdb. The Version_store_kb column in the above query shows the current size of all the version stores.

I noticed version_store_kb was at 850 GB which caught my attention. At this point, Tempdb had reached a size of 950GB, out of which the Version store was using 850 GB. This indicated there were sessions using the version stores in tempdb. However, when I looked at the active sessions on the server, just the routine queries were running, which in the past had never caused any issues.

select r.session_id,
       r.cpu_time,
       p.physical_io,
       t.text,
       substring(t.text, r.statement_start_offset/2 + 1, case when r.statement_end_offset = -1 then len(t.text) else (r.statement_end_offset - r.statement_start_offset)/2 end) as text_running,
       p.blocked,
       db_name(p.dbid) as dbname,
       r.status,
       r.command,
       r.start_time,
       r.wait_type,
       p.waitresource,
       p.status,
       p.open_tran,
       p.loginame,         
       p.hostname,
       p.program_name,
       r.percent_complete,
       r.wait_type,
       r.last_wait_type,
       p.waittime
from sys.dm_exec_requests r
       cross apply sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.sql_handle) t
       inner join sys.sysprocesses p on p.spid = r.session_id

After further investigation, with the help of performance counters, I tracked the below performance counters.

  • SQLServer:Transactions\Longest Transaction Running Time – shows the longest transaction that’s currently running
  • SQLServer:Transactions\Version Store Size (KB) – shows the current size of all the version stores
  • SQLServer:Transactions\Version Cleanup rate (KB/s) – shows the rate of version cleanup in tempdb
  • SQLServer:Transactions\Version Generation rate (KB/s) – shows the rate of version generation

The Longest Transaction Running time counter was showing the value ~ 637803. This meant there was an old transaction that was still using the version store. The Version Store Size (KB) was showing ~850 GB and was still growing bigger. The version Generation rate (KB/s) was at 500 KB/s which was an acceptable range. The Version Cleanup rate (KB/s) was zero which indicated there was no cleanup happening on version store.

I then tried mapping the time of the oldest transaction that was using version store using the below query:

select dateadd(ss, -637803,getdate())

I then mapped the above time with last_batch in master.sys.sysprocesses table.

select spid, 
       login_time, 
       last_batch, 
       status 
from   master.sys.sysprocesses 
where  last_batch between '2016-09-20 05:44' and '2016-09-20 05:46'

kill 484

The SPID was in sleeping state and was 7 days old. As soon as I killed the SPID, the version cleanup started and Version store size started to decrease. The session that was in sleeping state was actually blocking the version store from cleaning up.

SELECT GETDATE() AS runtime,
    SUM(user_object_reserved_page_count) * 8 AS usr_obj_kb,
    SUM(internal_object_reserved_page_count) * 8 AS internal_obj_kb,
    SUM(version_store_reserved_page_count) * 8 AS version_store_kb,
    SUM(unallocated_extent_page_count) * 8 AS freespace_kb,
    SUM(mixed_extent_page_count) * 8 AS mixedextent_kb
FROM sys.dm_db_file_space_usage;

Conclusion

It is good to monitor tempdb growth on AlwaysON secondary server because alwaysOn uses tempdb to store row versions and temporary readonly statistics that are created by optimizer on readonly databases.

The performance counters like Version Store Size (KB), Version Cleanup rate (KB/s), Version Generation rate (KB/s), Longest Transaction Running Time are helpful in troubleshooting version store growth in tempdb. It is also a good practice to kill sessions that are idle for long.

This was one of the interesting issues I faced in the recent past and wanted to share the same with you. Hope my article is helpful.

Redgate SQL Monitor
 
Total article views: 1427 | Views in the last 30 days: 17
 
Related Articles
FORUM

Tempdb issue

Tempdb issue

FORUM

TEMPDB

TempDB and cpu's

FORUM

Transaction/Sec on tempdb

Question about the Transaction/Sec counter on the tempdb

FORUM

High count of version-store pages in tempdb

I have scheduled the following query to run once a minute on my instance and store the results in a ...

BLOG

How Row versioning impact tempDB ?

Scenario: DBA found that tempdDBdatabase usage is getting high and most of the size is consumed by r...

Tags
always on    
sql server 2014    
tempdb    
version store    
 
Contribute