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The Basics of Good T-SQL Coding Style – Part 4: Performance

There are several obvious problems with poor SQL Coding habits. It can make code difficult to maintain, or can confuse your team colleagues. It can make refactoring a chore or make testing difficult. The most serious problem is poor performance. You can write SQL that looks beautiful but performs sluggishly, or interferes with other threads. A busy database developer adopts good habits so as to avoid staring at execution plans. Rob Sheldon gives some examples.  Read more...
By Additional Articles 2017/10/05 | Source: SimpleTalk | Category: t-sql
Rating: (not yet rated)  Rate this |   Briefcase | 5,547 reads

Using multiple custom SQL formatting styles in SQL Prompt

Usually, when coding SQL, you will want to go along with the coding style of the team you are working with. This article shows how to use SQL Prompt formatting styles to create and maintain multiple code styles, each for a dedicated purpose, and to switch between them and apply a new style to existing code, with ease.  Read more...
By 2017/08/14 | Source: Redgate | Category: t-sql
Rating: (not yet rated)  Rate this |   Briefcase | 3,873 reads

The Basics of Good T-SQL Coding Style – Part 2: Defining Database Objects

Technical debt is a real problem in database development, where corners have been cut in the rush to keep to dates. The result may work but the problems are in the details: such things as inconsistent naming of objects, or of defining columns; sloppy use of data types, archaic syntax or obsolete system functions. With databases, technical debt is even harder to pay back. Robert Sheldon explains how and why you can get it right first time instead.  Read more...
By Additional Articles 2017/07/25 | Source: SimpleTalk | Category: t-sql
Rating: (not yet rated)  Rate this |   Briefcase | 5,593 reads

The Basics of Good T-SQL Coding Style

TSQL Code must work properly and efficiently. That's not enough though. Unless you are working alone, have perfect memory and plan to never change job, then you need to comment and document your code, it must be inherently readable, well laid out, use informative and obvious names, and it must be robust and resilient; written defensively. It must not rely on deprecated features of SQL Server, or assume particular database settings. Robert Sheldon starts a series of articles that explains the basics.  Read more...
By Additional Articles 2017/07/05 | Source: SimpleTalk | Category: t-sql
Rating:  Rate this |   Briefcase | 5,977 reads
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