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Content with tag Stairway Series Rss

<< Newer    Items 41 to 60 of 324    Older >>
 

Stairway to MDX - Level 11: MDX Time/Date Series Functions: PeriodsToDate() and Derivative Shortcut Functions

BI Architect Bill Pearson launches a set of articles surrounding a group of MDX functions specialized to meet the pervasive business need to analyze data within the context of time / date. In this article, we will overview the PeriodsToDate() function, and then we will introduce "shortcut" functions that are based upon it.  Read more...
By Bill Pearson 2015/06/17 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 3,566 reads

Stairway to Columnstore Indexes Level 3: Building The Columnstore

The performance increase columnstore indexes grant when reading data from the index is offset by the expensive process required to build the index. In this Stairway level, Hugo Kornelis walks you through the steps SQL Server takes when building (or rebuilding) a columnstore index.  Read more...
By Hugo Kornelis 2015/06/10 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 3,767 reads

Stairway to SQL Server Security Level 9: Transparent Data Encryption

Even an otherwise well-secured database is susceptible to attack if an attacker is able to get access to the disk files that comprise the database. Cell-level encryption can protect some of the data, but for complete protection against this kind of attack it is necessary to encrypt the files and not just the data. That is exactly what Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) does, and in this stairway level you'll learn what TDE does, how it works, and how to make use of it to protect your database files.  Read more...
By Don Kiely 2015/06/03 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 3,451 reads

Stairway to Advanced T-SQL Level 5: Turning Data On Its Side Using PIVOT Operator

The PIVOT operator was added to the Transact-SQL language in SQL Server 2005. It allows you to turn your row data on its side, so it can be presented as column data. This is useful when you want take unique column values and have them displayed as column headings, where the column headings are associated with summarized values displayed below each column heading. In this article I will be exploring how to use the PIVOT operator.   Read more...
By Gregory Larsen 2015/05/27 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 8,412 reads

Level 3 - Building the Ideal VMware-based SQL Server Virtual Machine

In this level of the Stairway to SQL Server Virtualization David looks at the ideal virtual machine setup for a SQL Server instance on VMware.  Read more...
By David Klee 2015/05/20 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: virtualization
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 7,773 reads

Level 2 - The Ideal SQL Server Virtual Machine Architecture

In Level 2 of the Stairway to SQL Server Virtualization, we examine the ideal VM configuration from a standpoint of the various resources involved.  Read more...
By David Klee 2015/05/13 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: virtualization
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 12,389 reads

Stairway to Advanced T-SQL Level 4: Record Level Processing Using Transact-SQL Cursors

Using a CURSOR is not normally the best way to process through a set of records. Yet when a seasoned programmer moves to writing TSQL for the first time they frequently look for ways to process a sets of records one row at a time. They do this because they are not used to thinking about processing records as a set. In order to process through a TSQL record set a row at a time you can use a cursor. A cursor is a record set that is defined with the DECLARE CURSOR statement. Cursors can be defined as either read-only or updatable. In this article I will introduce you to using cursors to do record level processing one row at a time.   Read more...
By Gregory Larsen 2015/05/06 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 5,649 reads

Stairway to Columnstore Indexes Level 2: Columnstore Storage

To fully appreciate just how different columnstore indexes are, and why work so well in reporting and online analytical processing (OLAP) workloads, but not for online transaction processing (OLTP), we must first look at the traditional “rowstore” indexes.  Read more...
By Hugo Kornelis 2015/04/29 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 5,502 reads

Stairway to SQL PowerShell Level 9: Objects For Everyone

This level will show how to create objects including a login, a database, a filegroup, a file a database user and then we’ll end with a table and an index.  Read more...
By Ben Miller 2015/04/22 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 3,831 reads

Stairway to SQL Server Security Level 8: Data Encryption

This stairway level will explore data protection through encryption, both when the data is in motion across the network or in memory and at rest in a table. You’ll learn about the encryption key hierarchy and the various kinds of keys you can use to encrypt data, as well as how you can manage the keys or let SQL Server do it for you.  Read more...
By Don Kiely 2015/04/15 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 3,997 reads

Stairway to SQL Server Security Level 7: Security Across Databases with Cross-Database Ownership Chaining

Sometimes you need to reach outside a database and access data and objects from multiple databases, which raises some security issues and increases the complexity of data access. In this stairway level, you’ll learn about cross-database ownership chaining so that you can reach across database boundaries securely.  Read more...
By Don Kiely 2015/04/08 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 2,722 reads

Stairway to SQL PowerShell Level 1: SQL PowerShell Basics

What are PowerShell and SQL PowerShell and how do you use them? Level 1 of this Stairway will help you answer these questions, and start to show you why you might want to use this great tool.  Read more...
By Ben Miller 2015/03/20 (first published: 2012/08/08) | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 47,843 reads

Stairway to Advanced T-SQL Level 3: Understanding Common Table Expressions (CTEs)

A CTE is a temporary result set defined by a simple query, and is used within the execution scope of a single INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, or SELECT statement. In this article we will explore how to define and use CTE's.  Read more...
By 2015/03/18 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 13,335 reads

Stairway to SQLCLR Level 5: Development (Using .NET within SQL Server)

This time we take a look at various aspects and limitations of working with SQL Server's CLR that affect what can be done and how to do certain things.  Read more...
By Solomon Rutzky 2015/03/11 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 5,160 reads

Stairway to Database Source Control Level 3: Working With Others (Centralized Repository)

One of the main purposes of placing a database under source control, alongside the application code, is to allow team collaboration during development projects. The Version Control System (VCS) stores and manages all of the project files, maintaining an audit trail of what changed, and who made the change. Each team member can work on a file, or set of files, and submit their changes to the VCS to make them available to other team members. They can also inspect the VCS to discover recent changes made by other team members.  Read more...
By Dave Green 2015/03/04 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 3,716 reads

Stairway to Columnstore Indexes Level 1: A First Look At Columnstore Indexes

This level introduces of you to the fundamentals of columnstore indexes, introdused in SQL Server 2012 to manage the indexing of very large tables.  Read more...
By Hugo Kornelis 2015/02/25 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 9,947 reads

SSIS Catalog Environments– Step 20 of the Stairway to Integration Services

In this next level of the Stairway to Integration Services, we look at the SSIS catalog environments and how they help you manage your package parameters.  Read more...
By Andy Leonard 2015/02/18 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 6,482 reads

Stairway to SQL Server Security Level 6: Execution Context and Code Signing

A fundamental way that SQL Server determines whether a principal has the permissions necessary to execute code is with its execution context rules. It’s all complicated by the possibility that a principal has permission to execute code but doesn’t have permission on the underlying objects accessed by the code, such as the data in a table. This stairway level will explore SQL Server’s execution context, ownership chains, and impersonation, as well as show you how you can control access to data via T-SQL code.  Read more...
By Don Kiely 2015/02/04 | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 2,887 reads

Stairway to Advanced T-SQL Level 2: Using the APPLY Operator

The APPLY operator allows you to join a record set with a function, and apply the function to every qualifying row of the table (or view). The APPLY operator takes on two formats: CROSS APPLY, or OUTER APPLY. This article will explain the differences between these two formats, and show you examples of how each of these formats work.  Read more...
By Gregory Larsen 2016/03/30 (first published: 2015/01/28) | Source: SQLServerCentral.com | Category: stairway series
Rating: |  Discuss |   Briefcase | 16,729 reads

Stairway to Columnstore Indexes

SQL Server 2012 and later offer a very different type of index from the traditional b-tree, the in-memory columnstore index. These indexes use a column-based storage model, as well as a new 'batch mode' of query execution and can offer huge performance increases for certain workloads. But how are they built, how do they work, and why do they manage to have such a dramatic impact on performance? In this stairway, Hugo Kornelis explains all, with his usual mix of concise description and detailed demonstration.  Read more...
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