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Is the MVP Worth It? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 12:14 AM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Is the MVP Worth It?






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Post #934413
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 12:25 AM


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Like you said, you need to do the work with or without the award.

Gail made a very strong statement, which I agree with, that it's not something to work for, but rather recognition awarded to you.

I also think that you are either the type to deliver the kind of work and contributions, or not (it might even be seen as a personality trait ??).

The title would obviously be a massive award, to me, to anyone, but it should not be your goal.
This would a result of setting your goals towards community work (SQL Related )



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Msg 8134, Level 16, State 1, Line 1
Divide by zero error encountered.
Post #934417
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 4:44 AM
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If I were to choose between putting in the hard yards for a MVP vs. MBA, I would absolutely go for the MBA. I also dare say there is more in it for Microsoft than for the individual. As an MVP, you are evangalizing their products to the world and - as Steve said - are paid little to nothing extra to do it. Not to mention the extremely valuable product and community feedback MS is spoon-fed through the MVP channel. It certainly would be interesting to know what value Microsoft places on their MVP's. Surely somewhere within the bowels of the MVP program, someone has worked out the tangible and/or intangible value of your typical MVP.

For me, there are countless better ways to "give back" than to support the product development & marketing efforts of a very profitable $60billion global company. Of course, I'm cynical about these things and as George Carlin once said: "Scratch any cynic and you will find a disappointed idealist."

Looking forward to other opinions.




James Stover, McDBA
Post #934517
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 6:04 AM


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In over 30 years in this business, I have rarely seen anyone with an MVP award who actually measures up to being an "MVP" - and worse, in some cases, those with this award have very narrow knowledge - in that, yes they are experts, but often they cannot step outside that narrow alley of what they know.

Worse, since the MVP award is really a Microsoft "animal" - how can that represent an impartial view, let alone definition of what an MVP is. Maybe you're a SQL Server MVP - but you don't know squat about say, C#... Is THAT really an "MVP"??? I will take an experienced 'MacGyver' type with wide knowledge, over any MVP with narrow knowledge any day.

The entire concept is a sales gimic and therein, the entire concept is ridiculous and always has been.


There's no such thing as dumb questions, only poorly thought-out answers...
Post #934546
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 6:18 AM


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An excellent question, and comparing it to writing a book is pretty apt. I suspect, more than anything, it's a personality trait that drives a person to do that kind of labor outside of normal working hours. Is it worth it? It's honestly hard to say. I guess you have to ask if you believe in the concept of a "community" of SQL Server users. If you do think that there is such a critter, and you're one of the people that has helped build/maintain/grow that community, then a bit of recognition for the work is nice. The glass brick looks good on your desk.

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Post #934552
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 8:40 AM


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To answer the question, I will ask another question. With or without the award/reward, is it worth it? Is it worthwhile to give of yourself to others? Is it worthwhile to help another person? Is it worthwhile to increase your personal knowledge (a common side effect of helping others) or skills or character? Is it worthwhile to feel good about having done something good? Does it make you feel good to give an act of service?

It doesn't matter to me that I am not an MVP or that I have not written a book. I try to help and it feels worthwhile to me.




Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
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Post #934644
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 10:12 AM
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CirquedeSQLeil (6/9/2010)
To answer the question, I will ask another question. With or without the award/reward, is it worth it? Is it worthwhile to give of yourself to others? Is it worthwhile to help another person? Is it worthwhile to increase your personal knowledge (a common side effect of helping others) or skills or character? Is it worthwhile to feel good about having done something good? Does it make you feel good to give an act of service?

It doesn't matter to me that I am not an MVP or that I have not written a book. I try to help and it feels worthwhile to me.


Yes. It does feel good to give service. I tend to do that outside of my career, though. I don't do it for recognition but I see the need and feel useful filling it. I can't comment on whether a M.S. MVP is worthwhile to have. Only those with the designation can answer that.
Post #934739
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 10:34 AM


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CirquedeSQLeil
Here! Here! I could not agree more with what you said. I am still new but I answer questions I feel I can and I get more out of doing that then I give. Often I may have to do some level of research to answer the question and I learn something I did not know before. I meet people I did not know before and make connections I did not have before. To say that I am not already rewarded would be simply wrong.


Dan

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Post #934761
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 11:01 AM


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CirquedeSQLeil (6/9/2010)
Is it worthwhile to increase your personal knowledge (a common side effect of helping others)


This is the reason I do it... not only do I learn (from researching the answer), but it reinforces what I've learned. And you get to learn from other posters when they present something different.


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Post #934783
Posted Wednesday, June 9, 2010 11:03 AM


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So Blandry, I'm confused, you're not an MVP because you don't know everything about a product? Or everything in some area? Or all technologies?

The award is a community award. It's not a technical one, though they (supposedly) do want people to contribute in a technical way.

It's what you make of it, and what you take from it, like many things. I like the program as there are many people passionate about MS products. We enjoy working with them, and we enjoy helping people. MS gives a few small rewards, and some inside information, and a few parties.







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