Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase ««1234»»»

Latitude, Longitude and the nautical Mile Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Wednesday, November 11, 2009 9:34 AM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 4:03 PM
Points: 164, Visits: 143
Dale Turley (11/11/2009)
WTF???

There are some really useless and pointless questions on here sometimes... but this takes the biscuit!!


I suppose if you feel that using SQL server to store locational information such as lat/long is "useless and pointless" then you'd feel that way about this question.

But for folks that need to work with such data, perhaps tracking movement of shipping containers (which can now 'phone home' using GPS/Satcom systems mounted on the container) or similar things, the relationship between units of distance, and the units used to store the locations can potentially be important.

Is that truely more trivial then some of the very obscure SQL details we've sometimes seen posted? I guess like art, that's in the eye of the beholder.
Post #817272
Posted Wednesday, November 11, 2009 9:42 AM
Right there with Babe

Right there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with Babe

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 12:05 PM
Points: 720, Visits: 696
It's not just oceans. With Geospatial you can never draw a straight line between two points. Most of us work in geographically limited data so it doesn't matter much, but with larger distances the differences can add up fast. Geospatial is always dealing with the surface of the sphere(ellipsoid).

I used to have to deal with data that would be disqualified if it was more than 300m from a given point. In some cases the difference between Nautical and Standard was enough to drop a few points.

What this has to do with SQL Server vs. any other db I'm not sure.
Post #817280
Posted Wednesday, November 11, 2009 10:13 AM
Hall of Fame

Hall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of Fame

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, November 10, 2014 12:05 PM
Points: 3,969, Visits: 3,648
No problem, it is just a fairly easy point for Veterans Day.
Post #817316
Posted Wednesday, November 11, 2009 11:09 AM


Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 1:51 PM
Points: 341, Visits: 311
I think it's pointless because it's too exclusive and doesn't relate to SQL Server specifically (instead it relates to data which might be stored). It would be like asking what the markup value for a retail chain's merchandise might be. Sure, it may be useful for those people in retail, but not entirely useful for the SQL Server community.
Post #817342
Posted Wednesday, November 11, 2009 12:54 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Today @ 5:38 PM
Points: 31,368, Visits: 15,834
Feel free to ignore questions that don't apply to you.

Should we not ask questions on Service Broker because few of you use it? Or skip replication because it's not in most environments?

Complaining that it doesn't apply to your environment, or even a majority of the SQL Server community seems a little silly to me.







Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #817411
Posted Wednesday, November 11, 2009 4:23 PM
Right there with Babe

Right there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with Babe

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 12:55 AM
Points: 771, Visits: 504
Well said (or written) Steve.

The QotD are a good chance to learn something and to test your knowledge. However, answering one is not required.
Post #817541
Posted Wednesday, November 11, 2009 10:14 PM


SSCarpal Tunnel

SSCarpal TunnelSSCarpal TunnelSSCarpal TunnelSSCarpal TunnelSSCarpal TunnelSSCarpal TunnelSSCarpal TunnelSSCarpal TunnelSSCarpal Tunnel

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 12:04 PM
Points: 4,158, Visits: 5,555
Spatial data is becoming more vital in the financial sector, where banks need to determine an "at-a-glance" view the status of e.g. ATM's, and the distances between the faulty ATM and the nearest branch of the bank, or between suppliers of cash and branches.
While the determinance of nautical mile does not hold value for most, it is still a good means to calculate spead and length of travel time for those of that do.


____________________________________________
Space, the final frontier? not any more...
All limits henceforth are self-imposed.
“libera tute vulgaris ex”
Post #817604
Posted Thursday, November 12, 2009 2:40 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 9:37 AM
Points: 5,819, Visits: 3,737
I agree with Steve.

As primarily a developer (not database developer, a C# code monkey if you will) I need to learn a lot about SQL Server. I have a reasonable understanding of relational theory, SQL and specifically T-SQL, however, much like now DBAs have to code and be a part of architecting systems including the non-database parts I have to design database schemas and architect solutions including the use of SQL Server. Even if I do not currently use a feature, how can I choose whether any particular feature is applicable in any situation unless I have an understanding of what it provides?

A-har me maties!!!
Usual English humour with a Hungarian twist


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #817670
Posted Thursday, November 12, 2009 3:50 AM


Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, March 11, 2010 1:50 AM
Points: 54, Visits: 9
Gary,

Does it mean that to be a developer(any developer SQL, C# or may be Building developer) you'll need to know something that might be irrelevent? like what is the highest mountein on Mars the planet?

because someday, knowing that might help you writing a SQL procedure to calculate the distance between sun's depest crater and mars's highest tip?

The Point here is the "relevance"!

If I am really working on something specific, I'll go and look up the resources related to it. No one will ever think to come to SQLServerCentral for "which is the biggest mammel on earth?" kind of questions! its not LOGICAL! because there are hundreds of resources available on Internet to cater information related to those.

well, I really appreciate the one who posted this question because answering that question indeed added something to me which I didn't know. I am thankful too, but all our concerns is the same: "relevance"!

thanks
Post #817699
Posted Thursday, November 12, 2009 4:17 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 9:37 AM
Points: 5,819, Visits: 3,737
The question is relevant to many people working with SQL Server. If that does not apply to you then you can ignore the question.

There is no relevance in the topographical nature of a planet or species categorisation to SQL Server (domain specific knowledge excluded - anyone working at NASA, ESA or others please respond!!!). The question is relevant to the geospatial features of SQL Server.

I agree that the area is a little esoteric, the question phrased in a way that it appears irrelevant and I would argue with the answer. All said though the area of knowledge is relevant.

I have yet to see a question on the folicals of simians - as a code monkey with a developing bald patch this would be more relevant to me than the examples of irrelevance you have supplied


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #817706
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase ««1234»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse