Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 12345»»»

Effective Dating Series Part I - The Problem Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Wednesday, September 30, 2009 11:05 PM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, May 31, 2012 9:13 AM
Points: 19, Visits: 128
Comments posted to this topic are about the item Effective Dating Series Part I - The Problem
Post #796136
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 2:01 AM
SSC Rookie

SSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC Rookie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, January 19, 2010 9:32 AM
Points: 35, Visits: 24
Hi.
I read the very interesting Article. But i have a little question... Why don't we implement the 2 dates into the promotion table instep off the promoted products? In this way we could not replicate the same dates for every product...

It could be a good idea or not? And if not, could you explain me the reason?

Thank you very much

Bye
Mauro
Post #796183
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 2:45 AM
SSC Journeyman

SSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC Journeyman

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, January 6, 2011 7:01 AM
Points: 80, Visits: 92
I'm inclined to agree with Mauro - to me it makes more sense to have the Promotion start and end date in the Promotions table, not the PromotedProducts table.

That then leaves the PP table design in a simpler state when you're asked to implement multiple pricings on the same product (i.e Buy 2 get 1 free OR Buy 6 get 4 free. Marketing departments do come up with this insanity!) which DO belong in the PP table.

This would also make your reporting easier, I think.

Well written article though, very easy to read and 100% clear in its delivery.
Post #796200
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 4:13 AM
SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, April 17, 2014 3:29 AM
Points: 229, Visits: 421
Why not just have a mathematical price modifier attached to the promotions table rather than a promotion price - that way you can apply a promotion to a group of products without having to set up a load of new prices, this makes applying and unapplying promotions a hell of a lot easier regardless of whether you're using an expiry date or not.
Post #796231
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 4:16 AM
SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, November 7, 2014 8:56 AM
Points: 210, Visits: 118
Arguably you could have the start/end dates at both levels! It really depends on the strategy you organisation takes. You might decide to have a particular promotion running for a finite period and then subsequently change the products that are included in that promotion. As you said Stephen, marketing departments come up with the most outlandish strategies some times.

I've been using temporal database design for a few years no and there's no question that it makes life easier down the track. I picked it up from a book 'The Data Model Resource Book' by Len Silverston which is well worth a read for any budding data modelers.



Post #796234
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 4:31 AM
SSC Journeyman

SSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC Journeyman

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, January 6, 2011 7:01 AM
Points: 80, Visits: 92
For sure, Temporal design can save many many headaches down the line.

A system I recently worked on had a very nice facility in addition to temporal data attached to the promotions and that was the ability to define how the pricing was done during the promotion- either a simple price change, a list of volume discounts, or a mathematical function.


Post #796239
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 5:59 AM


UDP Broadcaster

UDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP Broadcaster

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, January 2, 2013 12:15 PM
Points: 1,443, Visits: 711
Good Article- seems like a pretty simple concept, have used it many times in the past.
Post #796265
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 6:44 AM


SSChampion

SSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampion

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 9:58 AM
Points: 13,872, Visits: 9,600
When I've done this before, I've kept the dates in the promotions table. I called it a "PricingScheme" table, since it included other things that just special promotions, but it's the same concept.

I have to mention that seeing the title of this article made me wonder if SSC had changed into a different type of website overnight.


- Gus "GSquared", RSVP, OODA, MAP, NMVP, FAQ, SAT, SQL, DNA, RNA, UOI, IOU, AM, PM, AD, BC, BCE, USA, UN, CF, ROFL, LOL, ETC
Property of The Thread

"Nobody knows the age of the human race, but everyone agrees it's old enough to know better." - Anon
Post #796281
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 6:53 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, March 31, 2014 10:06 AM
Points: 2, Visits: 59
Great aticle! I've been trying to get this concept across to the developers of an accounting package that I work with. Managing changes in price lists (never mind promotional items) can be a bear. This process would simplify so many things for the end users. Being able to import "next week's price list" would be a great feature.

I would also consider using the date associated with the document header to locate these promo items instead of a system date. There will be cases where you have to back date a transaction and using the document's date vs. the system date will allow that.
Post #796286
Posted Thursday, October 1, 2009 6:56 AM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, October 15, 2014 1:36 PM
Points: 20, Visits: 77
Agreed with RobertM, there is a place for dates in both tables depending on the business strategy. Imagine if you had the same promotion with a rolling list of products to be discounted (e.g. the "Two for One" promotion that lasts all summer long, but which features a new/different product every week).

As to the person wondering about discount rates, there are pros and cons to that. The pro, as mentioned, is not maintaining a separate list of hard prices. The immediately obvious con is figuring out later, say 6-mos down the road, when products prices' may have changed, just how much that product cost under that promotion.

Post #796288
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 12345»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse