Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase ««12345»»»

Take a Seat Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:20 AM
Mr or Mrs. 500

Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, August 15, 2014 5:45 AM
Points: 561, Visits: 1,166
I'd start with the criteria "How many ways can it be adjusted". If it can be properly adjusted for lumbar support, height, tilt, arms etc, etc, then you have a chance of making it comfortable.
Here it's almost a crime to adjust the chair when you use someone's desk as it takes so long to get it just right!
Post #761525
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:33 AM


SSCoach

SSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoach

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, June 27, 2014 12:43 PM
Points: 15,444, Visits: 9,596
The way I buy a chair is by going to a store that sells them, and sitting for a few minutes in every one of them that looks even vaguely like it might be comfortable. I pick the ones that are the most comfortable, and sit there reading a book for a while. Salespeople sometimes stop by and ask what I'm doing, and I tell them I'm testing out the chairs. If they aren't happy with that, I'm happy with finding a different store, but that's only come up once.

It does you no good for me to tell you what I find comfortable to sit in. It has to be comfortable for you.

I've found that a half-hour in a chair is good enough to work out if it'll be comfortable enough for all day. Much less than that, and you're likely to miss something, like that it makes your legs go numb if you sit in it for half an hour.

Once I've found what I want, then I look at the pricetag, gasp, mutter under my breath about a few dollars of plastic and metal being sold for "how much!!!!?????!!!!!", and then buy it.

If I don't find one I like, or if the ones that are comfortable don't have the quality for a long use-life, I shop elsewhere.

Used office furniture stores are good. So is just about any place that sells chairs.


- Gus "GSquared", RSVP, OODA, MAP, NMVP, FAQ, SAT, SQL, DNA, RNA, UOI, IOU, AM, PM, AD, BC, BCE, USA, UN, CF, ROFL, LOL, ETC
Property of The Thread

"Nobody knows the age of the human race, but everyone agrees it's old enough to know better." - Anon
Post #761541
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:40 AM
SSCrazy

SSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazy

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, March 27, 2014 2:06 PM
Points: 2,639, Visits: 112
Don't skimp on the chair. It's something that we do spend a significant amount of time in, and can either make life comfortable or miserable. Like other posters mentioned - make sure there are plenty of ways to adjust it; make sure to check out used office furniture stores (or at least go to see the new ones, find a model you like, and check for it online - Ebay, Craigslist, etc. - to see who is getting rid of a relatively new one).

There's one last thing. Once you get it, you'll have to make sure that it's easy enough to pack up and bring home with you every night - otherwise, you may continuously find it away from your desk!
Post #761556
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:51 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, March 22, 2011 8:31 AM
Points: 3, Visits: 172
Forget just the chair. You need an ergonomic work station. One that not only includes a chair, but also an appropriate desk, monitor stand, an articulating keyboard/mouse tray and an adjustable foot rest. One of my auxiliary duties at my company is evaluating workstations for deskbound employees and showing them how to adjust their workstations to alleviate neck, back, wrist, and leg stresses. As a young buck (judging by your picture) you may not appreciate this, but after several years, these stresses take their toll on our bodies. I've had carpal tunnel surgeries on both wrists and have a herniated disc in my back. A lot of back/neck/hip/knee problems stem from our activities outside work and are further aggravated sitting in front of a monitor for several hours a day.

Here's a link to get you started: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/computerworkstations/

Good Luck,
Steve Tahan
Post #761565
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:53 AM


SSCommitted

SSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommitted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 10:41 AM
Points: 1,863, Visits: 2,014
blandry (7/29/2009)
Buy a new chair??? With hundreds of companies going out of business and still more laying off workers, you are going out and buying a new chair?


... but think of all the poor chair salespeople who need those commissions from new chair sales so they can afford to get their kids the GI-Joe with the Kung-Fu grip! (OK, I've watched the movie Trading Places too many times in the past month)

Seriously, What I've found typically to be a bigger problem than the chair is the proper keyboard placement. Every place I've ever worked at either doesn't have keyboard trays so the keyboard is a bit too high sitting on the desk, or they have improperly placed keyboard trays that sit too low and you have to adjust the chair so it's sitting on the floor making the rest of me uncomfortable. Chairs haven't bothered me much.
Post #761570
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:58 AM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, August 22, 2013 3:43 PM
Points: 23, Visits: 183
At my last company, I used chairs as a recruitment/retention tool. I gave each new employee up to $100 reimbursement to go purchase the chair that they preferred and submit a receipt. Since we were a small company, it was one less item that I had to procure, one less argument with the employee about what was a good, comfortable chair, and if the employee wanted more than $100 spent, they could chip in the difference.

It was a small thing to me, but it was huge to the employees to finally have a comfortable chair that they liked. The morale builder was worth way more than $100.
Post #761574
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:59 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, October 16, 2013 11:33 AM
Points: 4, Visits: 22
At my office in Mpls, the purchasers saw fit to buy "Herman Miller" chairs for everyone, and I have to say that the money has been well spent. I've had mine for nearly 9 years now, and day in, day out, it is absolutely the most comfortable chair I've ever had. If you are going to spend 8, 9, 10 hours a day sitting, a Herman Miller chair is well worth the money, IMHO...
Post #761576
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 8:22 AM
Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, January 27, 2014 10:14 AM
Points: 1,322, Visits: 1,091
Just ask for a new chair. I've spoken to several accounting higher ups about stuff like this and the overall attitude is that it's not a big deal. Yeah, it's $500 or so, but really, in the grand scheme of the budget that's not much money. If you gain 5 minutes of productivity a day the chair more than pays for itself in a year.

I had one CFO tell me that for small purchases like desktop printers and chairs and such going through a justification process costs the company more than just buying it.

While I understand the "but everyone will want one" argument I don't really think it's true. Some people like their chair, some people won't notice or care, some people will complain and not do anything about it and a few will ask for a new chair.
--
JimFive

P.S. I tried to spell check this but there seem to be no words in the dictionary.
Post #761605
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 8:23 AM
SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:18 AM
Points: 213, Visits: 519
In my last job we all had serious, and I mean serious, office chairs. In fact, they came with a training DVD and we actually had to attend half an hour of chair training. I kid you not. Why, you may ask, would a company shell out roughly $800 per chair and buy in the neighborhood of 10,000 of them? You guessed it - the combination of Workers Comp claims and the company's insurance carrier. Seems there were lots of repetitive motion injuries. Enough so that the company had to do big league damage control.
Fast forward to my current job. During the process of deciding if this job was a good fit for me I noticed that the chair I would be using was horrible. OK, maybe it was tolerable for someone with no arthritis, back issues or rotator cuff problems. But it didn't even have arms. Regardless, I made a proper office chair a condition of employment. Then, when reporting for my first day the boss told me to go speak with purchasing and pick out a chair. Purchasing had a fit! I mentioned condition of employment and the Purchasing Manager acquiesced with a comment that everybody was going to request a good chair once they saw mine. Ya think? I became the chair snob. That was good with me. Needless to say, there are far less repetitive motion injuries around here. That saves everybody money. That keeps people at their desks working. If a company is going to make a profit they need to look at the whole picture, not just the upfront costs.
Post #761609
Posted Wednesday, July 29, 2009 8:28 AM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, December 12, 2013 1:09 PM
Points: 111, Visits: 541
As a young buck (judging by your picture) you may not appreciate this, but after several years, these stresses take their toll on our bodies.
Steve Tahan


Let's just say I'm not a 20-something anymore. :)

As I'm reading these comments, I'm reminded of the "mind over matter" addage. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter.

Some people however, like Steve, refuse to just accept working conditions as they are, or now regret accepting them earlier on and now multiple carpel tunnel surgeries later, are here to tell others coming up in the industry to take a stand - or a seat - if you will.

Yet those like Steve are likely to be received by much of the younger crowd similar to the wedding guest who was halted by the ancient mariner in Coleridge's "Ryme of the Ancient Mariner" who had his story of warning to tell - that ultimately fell on deaf ears.

I also can't wait to get on to the wedding feast and have my adventures, but when I get there, there'd better be some decent chairs. I've had it with these pieces of rubbish.



Bill Nicolich: www.SQLFave.com.
Daily tweet of what's new and interesting: AppendNow
Post #761620
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase ««12345»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse