Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 12»»

Stress Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 12:49 AM


Mr or Mrs. 500

Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 5:03 AM
Points: 579, Visits: 2,520
Comments posted to this topic are about the item Stress


Best wishes,

Phil Factor
Simple Talk
Post #746014
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 2:20 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, July 30, 2014 8:53 AM
Points: 1,049, Visits: 3,003
Good editorial and well presented.

As well as being a DBA, I also happen to be a first aider, and one of the incidents I had to respond to a few months ago was someone who suffered a panic attack (which we, the first aiders, fortunately correctly diagnosed despite everyone else in the meeting with the casualty jumping to the heart attack assumption). Stress, when allowed to, can adversely affect anyone and the results can be dramatic, long lasting or both. And, of course, responding to someone with those symptoms can be pretty stressful too.....

One of the points in the article that rang most bells, though, was the last paragraph; the point about eccentrics having the confidence to be themselves. DBAs are often called to work outside their "comfort zone", and that calls for a confidence not in your existing bank of knowledge but of your ability to assimilate new knowledge on the fly. That's a pretty high degree of self confidence, whether you're eccentric or not, and I can't help but believe those who can become "comfortable" outside their "comfort zone" will be less susceptible to the adverse effects of stress.


Semper in excretia, sumus solum profundum variat
Post #746052
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 4:52 AM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, November 18, 2010 5:25 AM
Points: 162, Visits: 694
majorbloodnock (7/2/2009)


I also happen to be a first aider...



Thank-you.


majorbloodnock (7/2/2009)


One of the points in the article that rang most bells, though, was the last paragraph; the point about eccentrics having the confidence to be themselves. DBAs are often called to work outside their "comfort zone", and that calls for a confidence not in your existing bank of knowledge but of your ability to assimilate new knowledge on the fly. That's a pretty high degree of self confidence, whether you're eccentric or not, and I can't help but believe those who can become "comfortable" outside their "comfort zone" will be less susceptible to the adverse effects of stress.



EXCELLENT point. Now to convince my supervisors of that...




Honor Super Omnia-
Jason Miller
Post #746135
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 6:37 AM


Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, May 7, 2012 9:23 AM
Points: 304, Visits: 716
I often hear people talking about how they "relieve" stress and I find this very curious because it presumes that stress is something that is required. Its not. People then often retort that if you don't have stress, you are not taking your job seriously. That's also wrong and not at all true.

In the 90's I had a personal event/crisis during which I almost lost my life. Its an amazing and wonderful thing to come that close to death. I know that sounds weird, but if you go to that edge, nothing else in life is ever the same again. The mundane things that I once took for granted are now wonderful things. The so called "stresses" of work seem silly because well, in the end, it just doesn't matter. I do an important job, but if our company vanished tomorrow, the world would not end, and if we get really big and successful - same thing - we are not saving lives, we're just (frankly) doing digital ditties that help other people do their job. But its not going to cure cancer, bring peace to the world, or feed the hungry.

I have come to learn that stress is "home grown". We build it ourselves and then let ourselves feed it, and for some it becomes overwhelming - but ultimately, the problem is "us". You CAN take your job very seriously, and you CAN do that without stress. Indeed, just ask yourself, if you were gone tomorrow, would it really be the end of the entire world? No. Not likely.

Some say that for every stressful moment we spend, we cut one moment off of our lives. Through my own personal experience, I am not willing to give up any of those moments.

So the next time you feel stress I suggest you do what I have learned to do. Ask yourself, is this thing that is causing me stress going to matter in one hour, one day, one week, one year? And are you willing to shave away moments of your life for the sake of someone else's business. When I went to that 'edge' and came back, I realized - NO - I am not willing. No one should be. Life is your family, your friends, those you love and you should never feel any shame about not 'bleeding' for your job. Do good work. Work hard. Find success - but remember - true success is NOT in your job, or money. It's in how you play your part in the lives of those you love, and those you affect as a person.


There's no such thing as dumb questions, only poorly thought-out answers...
Post #746201
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 7:07 AM
SSC Eights!

SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 6:09 AM
Points: 846, Visits: 471
A co-worker who is also a long-time DBA on many platforms shared a 'platitude' with me the other day regarding stress that sort of echos what blandry is saying.

Look at stress like a dog would. If you can't eat it or hump it, p!$$ on it and walk away.


------------
Buy the ticket, take the ride. -- Hunter S. Thompson
Post #746226
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 7:12 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, July 30, 2014 8:53 AM
Points: 1,049, Visits: 3,003
Jason Miller (7/2/2009)
majorbloodnock (7/2/2009)


I also happen to be a first aider...



Thank-you.



My pleasure. Not entirely altruistic, though; I have kids and this is a way of being prepared for their emergencies whilst my company pays for the training. Everyone benefits this way.

@Blandry

I agree with a lot of what you say, but view it with a slightly different slant. In my opinion, stress is an unavoidable byproduct of anything happening that affects what is important to you. What's often forgotten, as you rightly point out, is that stress isn't always destructive; having each of my kids was incredibly stressful for me, but in an entirely positive way (I was keyed up for ages afterwards).

Therefore, one of the key steps is to better understand what we really believe to be important to us, and what your experience has obviously done is just that. However, many of us will still rate things on your "it's not that big a deal" list with a higher importance than you do. I, for instance, do view retaining my job as personally important simply because it's a means to feed my family, and anything affecting my job security has the capacity for raising my stress levels.

Which is why I believe reducing the number of things one sees as important is not the whole answer. One must also find a mechanism for accepting the stresses one is under, minimise their adverse effects and maximise their positive ones. How? Phil Factor's certainly touched on some, and I've suggested another, but I'm all ears for plenty more suggestions, 'cos there are definitely still times when pressure gets to me so my technique's nowhere near perfect.


Semper in excretia, sumus solum profundum variat
Post #746230
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 7:48 AM
SSC Journeyman

SSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC Journeyman

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 6, 2014 6:07 AM
Points: 94, Visits: 576
Personally, I typically reduce stress with a 6 pack of really good beer and some good old Chicago Blues.



Cheers
http://twitter.com/widba
http://widba.blogspot.com/
Post #746278
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 8:00 AM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, November 18, 2010 5:25 AM
Points: 162, Visits: 694
WI-DBA (7/2/2009)
Personally, I typically reduce stress with a 6 pack of really good beer and some good old Chicago Blues.



I like that idea. I'd throw in Johnny Winter for good measure (IMHO, the best blues guitarist out of Texas, bar none.)
Throw down some Dogfish IPA (90 minute preferred), Spaten Oktoberfest, Mönchshof Schwarzbier, Arrogant Bastard, or Ruination. Perhaps a nice TTT Trinidad...

I guess that's better than taking it out on your sparing partner. (Though I cant anymore. no more jiu jitsu. )
Now I just take it out on helpless paper tigers/targets.



Honor Super Omnia-
Jason Miller
Post #746289
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 8:06 AM
SSC Journeyman

SSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC Journeyman

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 6, 2014 6:07 AM
Points: 94, Visits: 576
Kudos on your choice of libations.





Cheers
http://twitter.com/widba
http://widba.blogspot.com/
Post #746294
Posted Thursday, July 2, 2009 8:15 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, July 19, 2012 8:59 AM
Points: 2, Visits: 16
I appreciate what you wrote about this topic. I think stress is the reason why there are so many over weight people in IT. They eat to relieve their stress and they don't take time for themselves. I am no longer going to feel guilty about enjoying my hobbies which include running marathons, gardening and reading.
Post #746303
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 12»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse