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Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 12:48 AM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Up Your Value






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Post #668966
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 5:46 AM
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For myself I maintain a list of achievements throughout the year in a Word document, then at review time I edit this and submit to my boss. I found if I wait until review time to try and remember what I did all year, I'll forget a lot of things. He can use it or not, but it gives me an input to my review. For my staff I have a form that I give them on a monthly basis to list their accomplishments; then we review it on a quarterly basis.
Post #669115
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 6:31 AM


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Really, it depends on your boss.
I had a list of accomplishments that I brought up in my review. In 2008, I definitely went above and beyond what other programmers have done in this company. I was told in my review that my accomplishments were what any "average" programmer would do.

Some bosses may not care about your brand or your accomplishments. They may just care about the bottom line.


Mia

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Post #669159
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 7:32 AM
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mhaskins (3/5/2009)
I was told in my review that my accomplishments were what any "average" programmer would do.


Mia,
Minimizing an employee's value by calling it 'average' is a nasty little tactic that depends on the normal human trait of self-minimalization. This boss definitely does not have your best interest at heart. This tactic works in just about any situation. Someone stays at work for 36 hours straight to recover a failed database - "that's what we pay her to do; what's the big deal?" Talk a customer out of canceling a major contract - "anybody could have done that; I just gave you the opportunity to see if you would screw it up." Build an excellent application that saves the company thousands of dollars each month - "well, don't worry, once you get some more experience you'll learn how to build a more elegant solution."

This type of manager is either a) trying to look good at your expense, b) trying to make you believe that you couldn't get a job anywhere else so that you won't leave, or c) is just a seriously screwed-up individual. In any case, don't depend on this manager to be good for your career.

\Steve
Post #669214
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 7:56 AM


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As a perhaps cynical note on this, keeping a running list of your accomplishments at a job also makes it much easier to update your resume if/when you find you need to do that.

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Post #669245
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 7:58 AM


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Steve S. (3/5/2009)
This boss definitely does not have your best interest at heart.


Yeah - no kidding. I have no clue whether he is trying for a, b, or c.
The point just was - that you can try to create your own brand, and list your accomplishments for the company, but you need to have a decent boss to actually look at those things and appreciate them.


Mia

I have come to the conclusion that the top man has one principle responsibility: to provide an atmosphere in which creative mavericks can do useful work.
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Post #669248
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 8:07 AM


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mhaskins (3/5/2009)
The point just was - that you can try to create your own brand, and list your accomplishments for the company, but you need to have a decent boss to actually look at those things and appreciate them.


That's when you walk out of the door and find a manager who does appreciate you (or preferably, find the manager first then resign)



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Post #669259
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 9:03 AM


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Mia,

Brent Ozar addresses some of this (http://www.brentozar.com/archive/2009/03/are-you-being-treated-fairly/) in his blog post.

If a manager doesn't appreciate what you've done, re-examine it and be sure that you have gone above and beyond. Talk to someone else you trust and see if you have really done more than others.

If you have, I'd look for a new position. The best time to get another job is when you don't need one.







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Post #669312
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 9:12 AM
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It took me years to realize that I had to look out for myself because bosses won't do it for you.

I finally gave up a Directors position in one company, sold everything we owned, and headed to a different part of the country with no promise of a job, but an expectation that anything would be better than what I left. Not easy to do at 56.

I now make 60% more than I did at my last job, working for an absolutely incredible company and a great boss.

Three things made it possible:
1. Finally believing in myself and my true worth to an organization.
2. Support of my wife (third time was a charm).
3. An overwhelming belief that things would work out for the better. (In my case based on a trust in God. Unusual for someone that hasn't been inside a church for over 30 years other than to get married...)

Definitely keep a realistic track of your skills, accomplishments, and worth to an organization, and if you are in a "co-dependant" job wise up and get the hell out..
Post #669320
Posted Thursday, March 5, 2009 9:20 AM
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We have a weekly staff meeting where we discuss our projects. That is the perfect time to also state what you've accomplished or whom you've served since the last meeting.

It's also time to say if you've messed up anything. Someone who is willing to take credit for accomplishments must also be willing to accept the blame. The blame list should be infrequent and very, very small. ;)
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