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I need differences between Roles, Schemas, Users and Logins. Can anyone help me. Thanks in advance Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, March 27, 2014 10:49 AM


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robin.pryor (3/27/2014)
Ah but the question "What landed me on this post in the 1st place?"

I'm a SQL DBA and I've never given a crap about schemas. I know what they are by definition, but have never once considered using them, because I'm probably too old-school. I think in terms of logins, groups, roles, and users. Now I'm in a circumstance where everybody and their mailman has had their hands in the cookie jar on this production server and nobody currently working here knows why things are the way they are. Should I create a new post to get flamed on "You call yourself a DBA....." or do you want to take a stab at answering me here?


First of all, we tend to frown on flaming anybody around here. That isn't to say it doesn't happen from time to time. I think you missed the whole reason the OP got flamed. Their login name is SQL DBA and they asked a question that demonstrates that the ego in their login name and their actual experience may vary a little bit. Don't be too cynical based on a single post that you found.

So to your question, are you asking for an explanation of what a schema is and why should they be used or when they are appropriate?


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Post #1555554
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2014 10:54 AM
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My question is actually more specific. I'm creating a topic in the 2008 security forum. Getting the details in right now.
Post #1555556
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2014 11:08 AM


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robin.pryor (3/27/2014)
Ah but the question "What landed me on this post in the 1st place?"

I'm a SQL DBA and I've never given a crap about schemas. I know what they are by definition, but have never once considered using them, because I'm probably too old-school. I think in terms of logins, groups, roles, and users. Now I'm in a circumstance where everybody and their mailman has had their hands in the cookie jar on this production server and nobody currently working here knows why things are the way they are. Should I create a new post to get flamed on "You call yourself a DBA....." or do you want to take a stab at answering me here?


Here to help out when & where I can. That doesn't mean I'll do people's homework for free though.

A schema is a security layer that allows you to separate object access and object ownership in order to provide more granular control over how you set up your databases. The others I provided the basics of up above.


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Post #1555570
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2014 11:11 AM
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Oh I understand that part. I liken a schema to a namespace or interface in OOP. My question is implementation-related
Post #1555574
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2014 11:15 AM


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robin.pryor (3/27/2014)
Oh I understand that part. I liken a schema to a namespace or interface in OOP. My question is implementation-related


Sorry, I'm missing something then. I don't see a question from you on this thread.


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"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood..." Theodore Roosevelt
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Author of:
SQL Server Query Performance Tuning
and
SQL Server Execution Plans

Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Post #1555578
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2014 11:22 AM
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I put it in the Security SS2K8 section:

http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic1555563-1526-1.aspx
Post #1555580
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