Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase «««4,2684,2694,2704,2714,272»»»

Are the posted questions getting worse? Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 9:07 AM


SSChampion

SSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampion

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:32 PM
Points: 13,067, Visits: 11,903
wolfkillj (1/29/2014)
Ed Wagner (1/29/2014)
Greg Edwards-268690 (1/29/2014)
GilaMonster (1/29/2014)
Ed Wagner (1/29/2014)
GilaMonster (1/29/2014)
Could use some of that chill down here. We had a couple of weeks of 35 C+ (high for JHB). Seriously unpleasant.

That sounds seriously unpleasant - that's 95 F. We're on opposite ends of the spectrum right now.


It's cooled down since. Fortunately.

Houses here don't typically have built in heating or air conditioning, the weather isn't usually extreme enough to need it.

Speaking of weather, Gail, I saw a documentary on strange weather phenomenon a couple days ago and they talked about one that occurs in either Cape Town or Johannesburg. Have you ever seen the mountain where the clouds stay near the top and continuously roll downwards? I think it was called a table cloud. It looked really cool.


Table Mountain, Cape Town.


I have seen over 100 F, and under -30 F here, so it's hard to imagine no heater or air conditioning.
And with Alaska hitting 62 F yesterday, when our high was 0 F, makes me question why do I live here.

I'll have to look for Table Mountain, sounds very interesting.

I've seen a similar temperature range here and it does make life interesting. As for Alaska, I heard they just had their first daylight in a while. They go for a couple months without daylight and then a couple months in the summer without darkness. I think that would get old fast if I lived there.

If you get the weather channel, the program was called "Strangest Weather on Earth", but I'm sure you can find something about it online. It was beyond cool.


My brother was stationed at Ft Wainwright (near Fairbanks, in central Alaska) when he was in the army. On the winter solstice, that area gets less than four hours of daylight. He said his first winter was VERY stressful - the dark and cold took a toll on a guy who was born in Texas and lived in Tennessee and Florida for his entire life.


But the summers make up for that in spades. I lived outside of Anchorage for year and the winter was horrible. Dark and damn cold most of the time. However, the summer was amazing. The sun was up all the time and the temps averaged right around 70 for most of the day. The only downside of the nice weather is avoiding the Alaska state bird (aka mosquito).


_______________________________________________________________

Need help? Help us help you.

Read the article at http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/ for best practices on asking questions.

Need to split a string? Try Jeff Moden's splitter.

Cross Tabs and Pivots, Part 1 – Converting Rows to Columns
Cross Tabs and Pivots, Part 2 - Dynamic Cross Tabs
Understanding and Using APPLY (Part 1)
Understanding and Using APPLY (Part 2)
Post #1535964
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 9:16 AM
SSCrazy

SSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazy

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 12:22 PM
Points: 2,751, Visits: 7,157
Greg Edwards-268690 (1/29/2014)
Jack Corbett (1/29/2014)
The weather here in New England has been odd this winter. We'll have a decent sized snow storm roll through (6+ inches), then we'll warm up to close to 50 F, lose most of the snow, and then the cold blast comes through (wind chill's ~-20 F) and ices up all the roads that have the snow melt.

On another note, I only see one threadizen has submitted a session to SQLSaturday #293 - Maine (June 28) thus far. This is a first-time city/state and the city of Portland, ME is considered one of the more interesting small cities in the US. Several microbreweries and good restaurants. As an incentive, I'll let you know that we are considering a lobster dinner for the speaker/volunteer dinner as that is something very Maine, and something that tends to be very expensive in other areas, but not too expensive in Maine, so a lot of people like to get lobster when they visit.


Maine is a place I'd like to visit something.
From what I have seen, similar to northern MN.
I'll have to keep that SQL Saturday in mind as it gets closer.

Fortunately for us, it has stayed cold.
That freeze / thaw / freeze can be very ugly.


It has an ocean!


--------------------------------------
When you encounter a problem, if the solution isn't readily evident go back to the start and check your assumptions.
--------------------------------------
It’s unpleasantly like being drunk.
What’s so unpleasant about being drunk?
You ask a glass of water. -- Douglas Adams
Post #1535969
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 9:25 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Today @ 5:30 PM
Points: 33,055, Visits: 15,167
Was 12F when I woke up, cold, needed a hat.

By 3:00pm, it was about 25, but no wind and a light jacket, no hat was OK.

By 9:00pm it was back to 10F, no wind, but after a few minutes outside, it was cold.







Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #1535975
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 9:28 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, July 16, 2014 3:21 PM
Points: 1,210, Visits: 2,512
Sean Lange (1/29/2014)
wolfkillj (1/29/2014)
Ed Wagner (1/29/2014)
Greg Edwards-268690 (1/29/2014)
GilaMonster (1/29/2014)
Ed Wagner (1/29/2014)
GilaMonster (1/29/2014)
Could use some of that chill down here. We had a couple of weeks of 35 C+ (high for JHB). Seriously unpleasant.

That sounds seriously unpleasant - that's 95 F. We're on opposite ends of the spectrum right now.


It's cooled down since. Fortunately.

Houses here don't typically have built in heating or air conditioning, the weather isn't usually extreme enough to need it.

Speaking of weather, Gail, I saw a documentary on strange weather phenomenon a couple days ago and they talked about one that occurs in either Cape Town or Johannesburg. Have you ever seen the mountain where the clouds stay near the top and continuously roll downwards? I think it was called a table cloud. It looked really cool.


Table Mountain, Cape Town.


I have seen over 100 F, and under -30 F here, so it's hard to imagine no heater or air conditioning.
And with Alaska hitting 62 F yesterday, when our high was 0 F, makes me question why do I live here.

I'll have to look for Table Mountain, sounds very interesting.

I've seen a similar temperature range here and it does make life interesting. As for Alaska, I heard they just had their first daylight in a while. They go for a couple months without daylight and then a couple months in the summer without darkness. I think that would get old fast if I lived there.

If you get the weather channel, the program was called "Strangest Weather on Earth", but I'm sure you can find something about it online. It was beyond cool.


My brother was stationed at Ft Wainwright (near Fairbanks, in central Alaska) when he was in the army. On the winter solstice, that area gets less than four hours of daylight. He said his first winter was VERY stressful - the dark and cold took a toll on a guy who was born in Texas and lived in Tennessee and Florida for his entire life.


But the summers make up for that in spades. I lived outside of Anchorage for year and the winter was horrible. Dark and damn cold most of the time. However, the summer was amazing. The sun was up all the time and the temps averaged right around 70 for most of the day. The only downside of the nice weather is avoiding the Alaska state bird (aka mosquito).


Ah, but Anchorage and Fairbanks have very different climates, mainly caused by the HUGE moderating influence of the Pacific Ocean. Anchorage has four months with subfreezing average high temps; Fairbanks has seven. Anchorage has zero months with sub-zero (F) average lows; Fairbanks has five. It gets a LOT colder in Fairbanks, plus the 3+ degree difference in latitude means that Anchorage gets over an hour more daylight than Fairbanks in the depth of winter. As my brother put it, people in Anchorage have to deal with winter; people in Fairbanks have to survive winter.

My brother also said that as nice as the long daylight in the summer could be, having less than four hours of darkness a day can really mess with one's circadian rhythm. He felt chronically sleep-deprived over the summer.


Jason Wolfkill
Blog: SQLSouth
Twitter: @SQLSouth
Post #1535977
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 9:33 AM


SSChampion

SSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampion

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:32 PM
Points: 13,067, Visits: 11,903
wolfkillj (1/29/2014)
Sean Lange (1/29/2014)
wolfkillj (1/29/2014)
Ed Wagner (1/29/2014)
Greg Edwards-268690 (1/29/2014)
GilaMonster (1/29/2014)
Ed Wagner (1/29/2014)
GilaMonster (1/29/2014)
Could use some of that chill down here. We had a couple of weeks of 35 C+ (high for JHB). Seriously unpleasant.

That sounds seriously unpleasant - that's 95 F. We're on opposite ends of the spectrum right now.


It's cooled down since. Fortunately.

Houses here don't typically have built in heating or air conditioning, the weather isn't usually extreme enough to need it.

Speaking of weather, Gail, I saw a documentary on strange weather phenomenon a couple days ago and they talked about one that occurs in either Cape Town or Johannesburg. Have you ever seen the mountain where the clouds stay near the top and continuously roll downwards? I think it was called a table cloud. It looked really cool.


Table Mountain, Cape Town.


I have seen over 100 F, and under -30 F here, so it's hard to imagine no heater or air conditioning.
And with Alaska hitting 62 F yesterday, when our high was 0 F, makes me question why do I live here.

I'll have to look for Table Mountain, sounds very interesting.

I've seen a similar temperature range here and it does make life interesting. As for Alaska, I heard they just had their first daylight in a while. They go for a couple months without daylight and then a couple months in the summer without darkness. I think that would get old fast if I lived there.

If you get the weather channel, the program was called "Strangest Weather on Earth", but I'm sure you can find something about it online. It was beyond cool.


My brother was stationed at Ft Wainwright (near Fairbanks, in central Alaska) when he was in the army. On the winter solstice, that area gets less than four hours of daylight. He said his first winter was VERY stressful - the dark and cold took a toll on a guy who was born in Texas and lived in Tennessee and Florida for his entire life.


But the summers make up for that in spades. I lived outside of Anchorage for year and the winter was horrible. Dark and damn cold most of the time. However, the summer was amazing. The sun was up all the time and the temps averaged right around 70 for most of the day. The only downside of the nice weather is avoiding the Alaska state bird (aka mosquito).


Ah, but Anchorage and Fairbanks have very different climates, mainly caused by the HUGE moderating influence of the Pacific Ocean. Anchorage has four months with subfreezing average high temps; Fairbanks has seven. Anchorage has zero months with sub-zero (F) average lows; Fairbanks has five. It gets a LOT colder in Fairbanks, plus the 3+ degree difference in latitude means that Anchorage gets over an hour more daylight than Fairbanks in the depth of winter. As my brother put it, people in Anchorage have to deal with winter; people in Fairbanks have to survive winter.

My brother also said that as nice as the long daylight in the summer could be, having less than four hours of darkness a day can really mess with one's circadian rhythm. He felt chronically sleep-deprived over the summer.


Very true about the temps. I was about an hour North of Anchorage well outside the city and far from the coast so the temps we not as moderate Anchorage. Still nothing like Fairbanks of course. The change from the Kansas City area where I grew up to even the lesser extremes of Alaska was pretty intense. I also had the advantage of living a cabin in the mountains and there were 2 rooms with no windows so sleeping was a bit easier since it was so dark in there. We avoided those rooms like the plague in the Winter though.


_______________________________________________________________

Need help? Help us help you.

Read the article at http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/ for best practices on asking questions.

Need to split a string? Try Jeff Moden's splitter.

Cross Tabs and Pivots, Part 1 – Converting Rows to Columns
Cross Tabs and Pivots, Part 2 - Dynamic Cross Tabs
Understanding and Using APPLY (Part 1)
Understanding and Using APPLY (Part 2)
Post #1535980
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 9:43 AM
SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, May 5, 2014 6:31 AM
Points: 291, Visits: 519
Yes, check this one
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic1535981-149-1.aspx#bm1535983
Post #1535989
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 9:45 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, July 16, 2014 3:21 PM
Points: 1,210, Visits: 2,512
Sean Lange (1/29/2014)
wolfkillj (1/29/2014)
Sean Lange (1/29/2014)
wolfkillj (1/29/2014)
Ed Wagner (1/29/2014)
Greg Edwards-268690 (1/29/2014)
GilaMonster (1/29/2014)
Ed Wagner (1/29/2014)
GilaMonster (1/29/2014)
Could use some of that chill down here. We had a couple of weeks of 35 C+ (high for JHB). Seriously unpleasant.

That sounds seriously unpleasant - that's 95 F. We're on opposite ends of the spectrum right now.


It's cooled down since. Fortunately.

Houses here don't typically have built in heating or air conditioning, the weather isn't usually extreme enough to need it.

Speaking of weather, Gail, I saw a documentary on strange weather phenomenon a couple days ago and they talked about one that occurs in either Cape Town or Johannesburg. Have you ever seen the mountain where the clouds stay near the top and continuously roll downwards? I think it was called a table cloud. It looked really cool.


Table Mountain, Cape Town.


I have seen over 100 F, and under -30 F here, so it's hard to imagine no heater or air conditioning.
And with Alaska hitting 62 F yesterday, when our high was 0 F, makes me question why do I live here.

I'll have to look for Table Mountain, sounds very interesting.

I've seen a similar temperature range here and it does make life interesting. As for Alaska, I heard they just had their first daylight in a while. They go for a couple months without daylight and then a couple months in the summer without darkness. I think that would get old fast if I lived there.

If you get the weather channel, the program was called "Strangest Weather on Earth", but I'm sure you can find something about it online. It was beyond cool.


My brother was stationed at Ft Wainwright (near Fairbanks, in central Alaska) when he was in the army. On the winter solstice, that area gets less than four hours of daylight. He said his first winter was VERY stressful - the dark and cold took a toll on a guy who was born in Texas and lived in Tennessee and Florida for his entire life.


But the summers make up for that in spades. I lived outside of Anchorage for year and the winter was horrible. Dark and damn cold most of the time. However, the summer was amazing. The sun was up all the time and the temps averaged right around 70 for most of the day. The only downside of the nice weather is avoiding the Alaska state bird (aka mosquito).


Ah, but Anchorage and Fairbanks have very different climates, mainly caused by the HUGE moderating influence of the Pacific Ocean. Anchorage has four months with subfreezing average high temps; Fairbanks has seven. Anchorage has zero months with sub-zero (F) average lows; Fairbanks has five. It gets a LOT colder in Fairbanks, plus the 3+ degree difference in latitude means that Anchorage gets over an hour more daylight than Fairbanks in the depth of winter. As my brother put it, people in Anchorage have to deal with winter; people in Fairbanks have to survive winter.

My brother also said that as nice as the long daylight in the summer could be, having less than four hours of darkness a day can really mess with one's circadian rhythm. He felt chronically sleep-deprived over the summer.


Very true about the temps. I was about an hour North of Anchorage well outside the city and far from the coast so the temps we not as moderate Anchorage. Still nothing like Fairbanks of course. The change from the Kansas City area where I grew up to even the lesser extremes of Alaska was pretty intense. I also had the advantage of living a cabin in the mountains and there were 2 rooms with no windows so sleeping was a bit easier since it was so dark in there. We avoided those rooms like the plague in the Winter though.


Yeah, for those of us who grew up anywhere south of the 41st parallel, the differences in climate of various parts of Alaska are basically academic - it's just freakin' cold everywhere up there.


Jason Wolfkill
Blog: SQLSouth
Twitter: @SQLSouth
Post #1535990
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 10:30 AM


Hall of Fame

Hall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of Fame

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 5:52 PM
Points: 3,325, Visits: 7,172
All this reminds me of my weirdest day regarding the weather (all in Mexico so under the 41st parallel). I had to leave Chihuahua at 6am with -4°F(-20°C), arrived to Mexico City at 59°F(15°C) and took a plane to a beach at the south of Mexico which was 86°F(30°C) at 7pm.
I love to read all this differences from the places where the threadizens live.



Luis C.
I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it. Stephen Leacock

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #1536029
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 11:13 AM


Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 3:00 PM
Points: 71, Visits: 2,155
I like that we are heading to summer. There is still daylight left when I get back from work. I did not see much daylight for the last two months.
Sun is even warming during the day. At the moment t we have -10C during say and -20C at night. Have to heat fireplace everyday to save on energy bill. Luckily I got my own wood.
Post #1536052
Posted Wednesday, January 29, 2014 11:20 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, July 16, 2014 3:21 PM
Points: 1,210, Visits: 2,512
I created and used my first extended events session last week, and it was great - easy and extremely helpful. I just posted about it on my blog, if you're interested in reading about my experience:

BLOG: Extended Events - As Cool as I Thought They'd Be


Jason Wolfkill
Blog: SQLSouth
Twitter: @SQLSouth
Post #1536058
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase «««4,2684,2694,2704,2714,272»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse