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Posted Monday, December 30, 2013 11:37 AM
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Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
GilaMonster (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
is there really a performance problem or are you just "tuning" the query as a knee-jerk response to seeing a scan in the execution plan or some similar shibboleth?


Exactly.

I'm tired of all the threads 'help me get rid of joins', 'how do I force an index seek', 'which join type performs worst', etc, etc.

Title comes from http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once


I like the title itself, too. I got the reference immediately - the "measure twice, cut once" maxim has saved me a good bit of aggravation in carpentry and woodworking projects.

Of course, "measure twice, cut once" really only refers to one of two possible error states - measuring too long/large and having to cut again to get the correct length/size. The other error state could probably be covered by the maxim, "measure twice, avoid a second trip to Home Depot."


Pfft. You can't avoid a second trip to Home Depot! That's a myth. All you can do is make it as inexpensive a second trip as possible.


Not true! I've actually completed a couple projects without second trips to Home Depot in the last few months. Of course, that's because I'm in the habit of buying 150% of the amount of everything I may possibly need for any given project. That way, if I didn't get it in the shopping trip for the current project, odds are that I have it in the surplus materials from previous projects.


How do you buy 150% of a hammer?

You don't. The key is to buy at least one new tool with every project. That way, you already have the specific hammer you'll need for the next project. I can always think of at least one new tool I need.

With supplies for a project, that's where you just buy extra.



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Post #1526565
Posted Monday, December 30, 2013 11:49 AM


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Ed Wagner (12/30/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
GilaMonster (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
is there really a performance problem or are you just "tuning" the query as a knee-jerk response to seeing a scan in the execution plan or some similar shibboleth?


Exactly.

I'm tired of all the threads 'help me get rid of joins', 'how do I force an index seek', 'which join type performs worst', etc, etc.

Title comes from http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once


I like the title itself, too. I got the reference immediately - the "measure twice, cut once" maxim has saved me a good bit of aggravation in carpentry and woodworking projects.

Of course, "measure twice, cut once" really only refers to one of two possible error states - measuring too long/large and having to cut again to get the correct length/size. The other error state could probably be covered by the maxim, "measure twice, avoid a second trip to Home Depot."


Pfft. You can't avoid a second trip to Home Depot! That's a myth. All you can do is make it as inexpensive a second trip as possible.


Not true! I've actually completed a couple projects without second trips to Home Depot in the last few months. Of course, that's because I'm in the habit of buying 150% of the amount of everything I may possibly need for any given project. That way, if I didn't get it in the shopping trip for the current project, odds are that I have it in the surplus materials from previous projects.


How do you buy 150% of a hammer?

You don't. The key is to buy at least one new tool with every project. That way, you already have the specific hammer you'll need for the next project. I can always think of at least one new tool I need.

With supplies for a project, that's where you just buy extra.


Many of my projects are just excuses to acquire tools. Sometimes, they're even vehicles for obscuring the fact that a tool was even purchased. Recently, for example, after telling my wife that we needed a new shower valve because I couldn't remove a screw with a broken head from the old, leaky one, I took one more stab at it and got the screw out. We no longer needed a new valve, but just coincidentally, a set of shower valve wrenches cost about the same as a new valve. Now, the faucet doesn't leak and I don't have to make awkward use of vise grips and channel locks to remove those valves any more. I call that a win-win.


Jason Wolfkill
Blog: SQLSouth
Twitter: @SQLSouth
Post #1526570
Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2013 1:53 AM


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Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
GilaMonster (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
is there really a performance problem or are you just "tuning" the query as a knee-jerk response to seeing a scan in the execution plan or some similar shibboleth?


Exactly.

I'm tired of all the threads 'help me get rid of joins', 'how do I force an index seek', 'which join type performs worst', etc, etc.

Title comes from http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once


I like the title itself, too. I got the reference immediately - the "measure twice, cut once" maxim has saved me a good bit of aggravation in carpentry and woodworking projects.

Of course, "measure twice, cut once" really only refers to one of two possible error states - measuring too long/large and having to cut again to get the correct length/size. The other error state could probably be covered by the maxim, "measure twice, avoid a second trip to Home Depot."


Pfft. You can't avoid a second trip to Home Depot! That's a myth. All you can do is make it as inexpensive a second trip as possible.


Not true! I've actually completed a couple projects without second trips to Home Depot in the last few months. Of course, that's because I'm in the habit of buying 150% of the amount of everything I may possibly need for any given project. That way, if I didn't get it in the shopping trip for the current project, odds are that I have it in the surplus materials from previous projects.


How do you buy 150% of a hammer?


Buy a bigger hammer than you need. A bodge hammer.
If it doesn't fit, hit it with a hammer. If it still doesn't fit, get a bigger hammer


“Write the query the simplest way. If through testing it becomes clear that the performance is inadequate, consider alternative query forms.” - Gail Shaw

For fast, accurate and documented assistance in answering your questions, please read this article.
Understanding and using APPLY, (I) and (II) Paul White
Hidden RBAR: Triangular Joins / The "Numbers" or "Tally" Table: What it is and how it replaces a loop Jeff Moden
Exploring Recursive CTEs by Example Dwain Camps
Post #1526685
Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2013 4:15 AM


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ChrisM@Work (12/31/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
GilaMonster (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
is there really a performance problem or are you just "tuning" the query as a knee-jerk response to seeing a scan in the execution plan or some similar shibboleth?


Exactly.

I'm tired of all the threads 'help me get rid of joins', 'how do I force an index seek', 'which join type performs worst', etc, etc.

Title comes from http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once


I like the title itself, too. I got the reference immediately - the "measure twice, cut once" maxim has saved me a good bit of aggravation in carpentry and woodworking projects.

Of course, "measure twice, cut once" really only refers to one of two possible error states - measuring too long/large and having to cut again to get the correct length/size. The other error state could probably be covered by the maxim, "measure twice, avoid a second trip to Home Depot."


Pfft. You can't avoid a second trip to Home Depot! That's a myth. All you can do is make it as inexpensive a second trip as possible.


Not true! I've actually completed a couple projects without second trips to Home Depot in the last few months. Of course, that's because I'm in the habit of buying 150% of the amount of everything I may possibly need for any given project. That way, if I didn't get it in the shopping trip for the current project, odds are that I have it in the surplus materials from previous projects.


How do you buy 150% of a hammer?


Buy a bigger hammer than you need. A bodge hammer.
If it doesn't fit, hit it with a hammer. If it still doesn't fit, get a bigger hammer


I'm assuming this is the approach you took to getting the hob installed in your new kitchen. How many hammers exactly did you need to buy?



My mantra: No loops! No CURSORs! No RBAR! Hoo-uh!

My thought question: Have you ever been told that your query runs too fast?

My advice:
INDEXing a poor-performing query is like putting sugar on cat food. Yeah, it probably tastes better but are you sure you want to eat it?
The path of least resistance can be a slippery slope. Take care that fixing your fixes of fixes doesn't snowball and end up costing you more than fixing the root cause would have in the first place.


Need to UNPIVOT? Why not CROSS APPLY VALUES instead?
Since random numbers are too important to be left to chance, let's generate some!
Learn to understand recursive CTEs by example.
Splitting strings based on patterns can be fast!
Post #1526717
Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2013 4:39 AM


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dwain.c (12/31/2013)
ChrisM@Work (12/31/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
GilaMonster (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
is there really a performance problem or are you just "tuning" the query as a knee-jerk response to seeing a scan in the execution plan or some similar shibboleth?


Exactly.

I'm tired of all the threads 'help me get rid of joins', 'how do I force an index seek', 'which join type performs worst', etc, etc.

Title comes from http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once


I like the title itself, too. I got the reference immediately - the "measure twice, cut once" maxim has saved me a good bit of aggravation in carpentry and woodworking projects.

Of course, "measure twice, cut once" really only refers to one of two possible error states - measuring too long/large and having to cut again to get the correct length/size. The other error state could probably be covered by the maxim, "measure twice, avoid a second trip to Home Depot."


Pfft. You can't avoid a second trip to Home Depot! That's a myth. All you can do is make it as inexpensive a second trip as possible.


Not true! I've actually completed a couple projects without second trips to Home Depot in the last few months. Of course, that's because I'm in the habit of buying 150% of the amount of everything I may possibly need for any given project. That way, if I didn't get it in the shopping trip for the current project, odds are that I have it in the surplus materials from previous projects.


How do you buy 150% of a hammer?


Buy a bigger hammer than you need. A bodge hammer.
If it doesn't fit, hit it with a hammer. If it still doesn't fit, get a bigger hammer


I'm assuming this is the approach you took to getting the hob installed in your new kitchen. How many hammers exactly did you need to buy?


Heh funny you should say that. Whilst GF's dad was building the extension doing the heavy stuff (pretty darned cool for a 67-year old) and I was working on the interior, that was the running joke because all we could hear was banging.
We completed the spare bedroom just in time for visitors at Xmas but I hadn't had time to fit a handle on the door. Two had failed. One of them didn't turn enough to pull the latch all the way, the other has a manufacturing problem. So on Xmas morning, mom removes her bag from the back of the door, tugs on the hole where the handle fits, and nothing happens because the bottom of the door is stuck fast in the new carpet. We're all downstairs swigging on the Cava with carols blaring out of the HiFi and she's stuck in there for 30 minutes, shouting and stamping on the floor!


“Write the query the simplest way. If through testing it becomes clear that the performance is inadequate, consider alternative query forms.” - Gail Shaw

For fast, accurate and documented assistance in answering your questions, please read this article.
Understanding and using APPLY, (I) and (II) Paul White
Hidden RBAR: Triangular Joins / The "Numbers" or "Tally" Table: What it is and how it replaces a loop Jeff Moden
Exploring Recursive CTEs by Example Dwain Camps
Post #1526721
Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2013 5:33 AM


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The rest of this week ought to be...
Interesting...

Some fun things, some not-so-fun things...

Tomorrow I'm going to be shivering and cheering at the NHL Winter Classic (Go WINGS!) considering they're predicting a high of 19F (about -7.2C for everyone on a rational temp scale) and it's being held in an outdoor football (US, not soccer) stadium.

Then Saturday, we get to do less fun things...
Take our two cats to the vet for checkups, and help the mom-in-law move...
yay
Thankfully, she's just moving down one floor in her building to a more wheelchair accessible apartment, but annoyingly no one else on the wifes' side of the family is available to help Saturday.
Post #1526729
Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2013 7:58 AM


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ChrisM@Work (12/31/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
GilaMonster (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
is there really a performance problem or are you just "tuning" the query as a knee-jerk response to seeing a scan in the execution plan or some similar shibboleth?


Exactly.

I'm tired of all the threads 'help me get rid of joins', 'how do I force an index seek', 'which join type performs worst', etc, etc.

Title comes from http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once


I like the title itself, too. I got the reference immediately - the "measure twice, cut once" maxim has saved me a good bit of aggravation in carpentry and woodworking projects.

Of course, "measure twice, cut once" really only refers to one of two possible error states - measuring too long/large and having to cut again to get the correct length/size. The other error state could probably be covered by the maxim, "measure twice, avoid a second trip to Home Depot."


Pfft. You can't avoid a second trip to Home Depot! That's a myth. All you can do is make it as inexpensive a second trip as possible.


Not true! I've actually completed a couple projects without second trips to Home Depot in the last few months. Of course, that's because I'm in the habit of buying 150% of the amount of everything I may possibly need for any given project. That way, if I didn't get it in the shopping trip for the current project, odds are that I have it in the surplus materials from previous projects.


How do you buy 150% of a hammer?


Buy a bigger hammer than you need. A bodge hammer.
If it doesn't fit, hit it with a hammer. If it still doesn't fit, get a bigger hammer


In my other life as a stagehand, sometimes getting a dodgy piece of a set to line up correctly requires the application of the microadjustment tool.


Jason Wolfkill
Blog: SQLSouth
Twitter: @SQLSouth
Post #1526752
Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2013 10:18 AM


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Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
GilaMonster (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
is there really a performance problem or are you just "tuning" the query as a knee-jerk response to seeing a scan in the execution plan or some similar shibboleth?


Exactly.

I'm tired of all the threads 'help me get rid of joins', 'how do I force an index seek', 'which join type performs worst', etc, etc.

Title comes from http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once


I like the title itself, too. I got the reference immediately - the "measure twice, cut once" maxim has saved me a good bit of aggravation in carpentry and woodworking projects.

Of course, "measure twice, cut once" really only refers to one of two possible error states - measuring too long/large and having to cut again to get the correct length/size. The other error state could probably be covered by the maxim, "measure twice, avoid a second trip to Home Depot."


Pfft. You can't avoid a second trip to Home Depot! That's a myth. All you can do is make it as inexpensive a second trip as possible.


+10




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Post #1526800
Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2013 10:22 AM


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wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
...

Many of my projects are just excuses to acquire tools. Sometimes, they're even vehicles for obscuring the fact that a tool was even purchased.


Winner Winner Chicken Dinnner





Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
I have given a name to my pain...
MCM SQL Server


SQL RNNR

Posting Performance Based Questions - Gail Shaw
Posting Data Etiquette - Jeff Moden
Hidden RBAR - Jeff Moden
VLFs and the Tran Log - Kimberly Tripp
Post #1526801
Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2013 10:30 AM


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Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
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Stefan Krzywicki (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
GilaMonster (12/30/2013)
wolfkillj (12/30/2013)
is there really a performance problem or are you just "tuning" the query as a knee-jerk response to seeing a scan in the execution plan or some similar shibboleth?


Exactly.

I'm tired of all the threads 'help me get rid of joins', 'how do I force an index seek', 'which join type performs worst', etc, etc.

Title comes from http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once


I like the title itself, too. I got the reference immediately - the "measure twice, cut once" maxim has saved me a good bit of aggravation in carpentry and woodworking projects.

Of course, "measure twice, cut once" really only refers to one of two possible error states - measuring too long/large and having to cut again to get the correct length/size. The other error state could probably be covered by the maxim, "measure twice, avoid a second trip to Home Depot."


Pfft. You can't avoid a second trip to Home Depot! That's a myth. All you can do is make it as inexpensive a second trip as possible.


Not true! I've actually completed a couple projects without second trips to Home Depot in the last few months. Of course, that's because I'm in the habit of buying 150% of the amount of everything I may possibly need for any given project. That way, if I didn't get it in the shopping trip for the current project, odds are that I have it in the surplus materials from previous projects.


How do you buy 150% of a hammer?

Seems easy, mostly. just buy what you need and another either half as big or twice as big. Or buy different sorts: If you know you will need a sledge hammer, you buy two different sizes. If you need a small ball and pane hammer, you get a light tack hammer as well just in case. You buy a pane and claw hammer with your lump hammer. If you want a wedge and pane hammer get a large one and a medium one.


Tom
Post #1526803
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