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Are the posted questions getting worse? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Friday, December 7, 2012 4:23 AM


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Revenant (12/6/2012)
@ Tom

Heydrich joined the navy as a cadet, but that is a different career track than rising through the ranks. You skip all private and non-com ranks.

Wrong meaning of the word "cadet" - I know that's it's meaning in the US, but it's generally not that in Europe. When I was young the Britsh army had both cadets (trainee enlisted men) and officer cadets (trainee officers).

Heydrich entered the German navy as a cadet enlisted man, and after two years was shifted onto the officer track and became an officer cadet (ie what you mean by cadet) and gained his commission as an officer after another two years. he didn't entre as an officer cadet.

Re SS, in 1931 it was a paramilitary organization akin to a private security company, not a regular military. (Waffen SS were established in 1933.)

So what? From 1929 onwards it was organised on military lines, as a private army rather than a security company, and had a clear distinction between officer and enlisted ranks, even more after the Stennes revolt in 1930 and Rohm's appointment to the SA. Heydrich joined as an SS-Mann, ie a private, and became a liutenant general about a decade later.
Edit: after some thought, I found one of probably few exceptions. Budyonny, Stalin's drinking buddy, raised from an enlisted man to the Marshal of the Soviet Union. He was rather inept, though.

There are plenty of other examples; You Americans do call Brigadiers Generals, don't you? That's why Brandie suggested a General doing a 1-star's job. So here are a couple who went from private to general (on the American definition) in the British army in the mid 20th century, taking less than six years to do it:

Enoch Powell: Private 1939, Lance-Corporal 1940, lieutenant 1940, Brigadier 1945.
Fitzroy Maclean: Private 1939, lance-corporal 1940, lieutenant 1941, Brigadier 1945, Major-General 1947.

And it could be done in the British Navy too, but the most famous example was a long time ago: Horatio Nelson joined as an Ordinary Seaman in 1771 and took 25 years to get to one star rank (commodore, in 1796), then had 5 further promotiopns reaching vice-admiral of the white 1804 (at that time the British navy had 3 rear admiral ranks, 3 vice admiral ranks, and 3 admiral ranks for officers in active service).


Tom
Post #1393988
Posted Friday, December 7, 2012 7:59 AM
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L' Eomot Inversé (12/7/2012)
Revenant (12/6/2012)
@ Tom

Heydrich joined the navy as a cadet, but that is a different career track than rising through the ranks. You skip all private and non-com ranks.

Wrong meaning of the word "cadet" - I know that's it's meaning in the US, but it's generally not that in Europe. When I was young the Britsh army had both cadets (trainee enlisted men) and officer cadets (trainee officers).

Heydrich entered the German navy as a cadet enlisted man, and after two years was shifted onto the officer track and became an officer cadet (ie what you mean by cadet) and gained his commission as an officer after another two years. he didn't entre as an officer cadet.

Re SS, in 1931 it was a paramilitary organization akin to a private security company, not a regular military. (Waffen SS were established in 1933.)

So what? From 1929 onwards it was organised on military lines, as a private army rather than a security company, and had a clear distinction between officer and enlisted ranks, even more after the Stennes revolt in 1930 and Rohm's appointment to the SA. Heydrich joined as an SS-Mann, ie a private, and became a liutenant general about a decade later.
Edit: after some thought, I found one of probably few exceptions. Budyonny, Stalin's drinking buddy, raised from an enlisted man to the Marshal of the Soviet Union. He was rather inept, though.

There are plenty of other examples; You Americans do call Brigadiers Generals, don't you? That's why Brandie suggested a General doing a 1-star's job. So here are a couple who went from private to general (on the American definition) in the British army in the mid 20th century, taking less than six years to do it:

Enoch Powell: Private 1939, Lance-Corporal 1940, lieutenant 1940, Brigadier 1945.
Fitzroy Maclean: Private 1939, lance-corporal 1940, lieutenant 1941, Brigadier 1945, Major-General 1947.

And it could be done in the British Navy too, but the most famous example was a long time ago: Horatio Nelson joined as an Ordinary Seaman in 1771 and took 25 years to get to one star rank (commodore, in 1796), then had 5 further promotiopns reaching vice-admiral of the white 1804 (at that time the British navy had 3 rear admiral ranks, 3 vice admiral ranks, and 3 admiral ranks for officers in active service).


Wars have a funny way of moving people up the ranks quickly.


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What’s so unpleasant about being drunk?
You ask a glass of water. -- Douglas Adams
Post #1394073
Posted Friday, December 7, 2012 11:58 AM


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Evil Kraig F (12/6/2012)
Brandie Tarvin (12/6/2012)
Hey, all. I don't know if I posted this before or not. If you're interested in writing, I have a special call that opens in February for science fiction / fantasy military fiction. What Honor Requires is the name of the call. The details can be found here: http://uraniaspecfic.blogspot.com/2012/08/what-honor-requires-special-call.html


Brandie, what's the general submission size you're looking for here? 4 page mag article, chapter, novella?

Also, I'm interested. Not sure what I want to do, but this seems like an awesome way to spread my wings a bit.


*facepalm* Sorry, I'm blind.

Genres: Science Fiction, Fantasy, Action/Adventure
Heat Levels: 0-2
Length: 20k+

What is a Heat Level? Can anyone tell me? I've never heard of that in this context.



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Post #1394188
Posted Friday, December 7, 2012 2:47 PM


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Stefan Krzywicki (12/6/2012)
L' Eomot Inversé (12/6/2012)
Brandie Tarvin (12/6/2012)
Hey, all. I don't know if I posted this before or not. If you're interested in writing, I have a special call that opens in February for science fiction / fantasy military fiction. What Honor Requires is the name of the call. The details can be found here: http://uraniaspecfic.blogspot.com/2012/08/what-honor-requires-special-call.html

Drat. I wish I hadn't read that. Brandie, you are a menace. I've been struggling for nearly 50 years not to write any fiction, and succeeding (never published fiction execpt in school mags, stopped because I wanted to learn maths more than I wanted to write), and now you've got me tempted again. I couldn't resist following the link. You are a thrugh menace! Now I'll try to forget about it.


Make your story about the general in charge of a brigade of mathematicians who's risen through the ranks.


Heh - Throw in a simulator and you're most of the way to Ender's game


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Your lack of planning does not constitute an emergency on my part...unless you're my manager...or a director and above...or a really loud-spoken end-user..All right - what was my emergency again?
Post #1394255
Posted Saturday, December 8, 2012 1:43 PM


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Sigh. What a way to spend a Saturday afternoon. Server that hosts our accounting and time card databases decided to start acting up yesterday.

Made some changes to the backup on it as well, RDPed into the office (thankfully closed on the weekends) to check that the backup worked the way I expected, couldn't access the server.

Did a Google of the BSOD error it threw up Friday morning, come to find out it tends to indicate a "hardware failure of the RAM, disk controller, or other components." Should have Googled it yesterday.

So, here I set, working on converting the server to a VM. Thankfully, it booted up OK, so I stopped the SQL services, and started the process. It's currently estimating it'll be about 5:15 before it's done, then I still need to get it going on the Hyper-V system...

Yay dedication...


Here's hoping the bosses appreciate this...
Jason
Post #1394357
Posted Monday, December 10, 2012 4:28 PM


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Saw this and thought of Brandie: http://scott-lynch.livejournal.com/159686.html

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Post #1394814
Posted Monday, December 10, 2012 6:16 PM
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Steve Jones - SSC Editor (12/10/2012)
Saw this and thought of Brandie: http://scott-lynch.livejournal.com/159686.html

An Author's response.


My favorite part is where the letter writer complains about too much realism in the fantasy (swearing) and then not enough realism in the fantasy (woman pirates (who did exist, btw))


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When you encounter a problem, if the solution isn't readily evident go back to the start and check your assumptions.
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Post #1394841
Posted Monday, December 10, 2012 9:16 PM


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jasona.work (12/8/2012)
Yay dedication...



You do know the difference between being "loyal" to a company and being "dedicated", right? You have to think "ham and eggs"...



... the chicken was "loyal".


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Post #1394870
Posted Monday, December 10, 2012 9:29 PM


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Jeff Moden (12/10/2012)
jasona.work (12/8/2012)
Yay dedication...



You do know the difference between being "loyal" to a company and being "dedicated", right? You have to think "ham and eggs"...



... the chicken was "loyal".


Yep...

Well, thankfully, things worked out OK. While the P2V conversion blew up (drive letters changed, including the OS,) the attempt to move the HDs into an identical server *ALSO* blew up (DON'T connect a Server 2003 drive to a Win8 PC to image it! The OS doesn't like that...,) we still managed to move the DBs over to an existing virtual machine and get everything back up before lunch today.

Now it's the fiddly bits, the SSIS packages that import Visual Foxpro tables (and export to them,) re-creating backup jobs, etc. Threw together an SQL2005 to restore the original MSDB, so we could script out a lot of the Agent jobs, had to work with our time card vendor to get everything working there (although people could clock in and out, so management didn't need to spend half the day correcting time sheets.)

Although, I may start considering just being "loyal" rather than "dedicated" in the future...


Jason
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Posted Tuesday, December 11, 2012 2:39 AM


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Myself and a colleague are having some problems with replication. To be honest, replication is something I've had very little to do with so I'm at a loss with trying to help. My colleague posted about it here --> http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic1394168-1549-1.aspx a few days ago, if someone could take a look and offer some insight then I'd be eternally grateful


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