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Is It Worth Upgrading to SQL Server 2008 Expand / Collapse
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Posted Friday, December 18, 2009 9:59 PM
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Please check the link given regarding differences between SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2008. The link doesnot exist.
Post #836761
Posted Friday, December 18, 2009 10:33 PM
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When the resource governer hits the standard edition we will be encouraged to move along.

DTS Minor Rant Warning:

BTW we still use DTS - despite having several books at work on SSIS that our key people have read at one point or another.

Thus far we have found DTS easier and more intuitive: SSIS takes a heap longer to achieve what comes intuitively in DTS, and this despite having no DTS documentation at all.

Why? Personal view - possibly a bit of a caricature but saying this to underscore a trend line not denigrate valid outliers - SSIS is in effect attempting to turn .NET application developers into DBAs raher than an attempt to provide a productivity framework that leverages the way DBAs handle data.

If I were to buy software from a sql focused company (e.g. RedGate) as a DBA I expect to be able to use their products directly - i.e. expect their software to enhance rapid-fire set based thinking out of the box - with no need to stop and translate anything into an alternate paradigm in order to "keep up" with the latest trends.

Personal view is .NET is coat-tailing the fundamental success of T-SQL rather than leavarging it by a demonstrable factor of "X". What I want is a product that delivers an "X" factor without having to change the way that I think - which is already carefully tuned around the foundational driver of T-SQL.

Are we squeezing DBA productivity through an unnecessary energy consuming vortex - in order to achieve a marketing target? Is there a productivity target? Solving pedantic application specific puzzles and side-isses does not add to my productivity as a DBA.

We are in the process of moving to a competitor to SSIS because we see MS taking the wrong fork in the road - DBAs should not have to leave a development environment in order to work in a foreign environment built for application development and then like the proverbial Humpty Dumpty, have to glue everything back together again better than new.
Post #836762
Posted Saturday, December 19, 2009 2:42 AM
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you are so right dude!
Post #836779
Posted Saturday, December 19, 2009 4:26 AM
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danschl (10/22/2008)
since there isnt going to be a sql2005 sp3

sql2008 is actually that, so we arent upgrading to sql2008 from sql2005

but it there is a new server purchase it will probably be sql2008



Ermm there is a SQL 2005 SP3 and has been for some time...

SP3 Link...


AMO AMAS AMATIT AGAIN
Post #836791
Posted Saturday, December 19, 2009 8:20 AM
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Good reason to upgrade to SQL 2008 is if your company uses Office products 2007.

BI - Excel import export of data to 2007

..unless there is some add on driver I don't know about like
SSMA sql server migration assistant for access 2003 and 2007.

Excel 2007 - more then 65,000 rows, and business analytic tools(really just wizards, but make it fast if you know what you want)

The SSIS packages follow a stricter Development environment which I think can be good, but still has those wizards, there just in different places. Take the time to look for them.

And more importantly If not upgrading all servers, continue to upgrade a test environment , don't wait to fall back until your forced to upgrade and see a complete departure of what you are used too.
Post #836802
Posted Saturday, December 19, 2009 8:39 AM
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Something worth thinking on with SQL 2008 is the Filestream functionality. I am told reliably (an MS source) that this was developed specifically with SharePoint in mind. The idea being quite lean databases with all the BLOB objects from the document libraries and other content being seperate to the database itself. SO all the Pro's of having a CMS and all the Pro's of having a Fileserver with none of the cons. Slightly off the DBA track I know but as it's a huge product at the moment its worth considering if you are spec'ing or designing backends for this kind of system.

D


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Post #836808
Posted Saturday, December 19, 2009 10:32 AM
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I guess it depends if you are a SQL Admin or developer. The intellisense is indeed a huge step up for developers at any site. I also love the fact that SSRS, which we use heavily for web services based reporting, does not require IIS any longer. It was a pain to setup and use due to that fact. SSRS doesn't seem to make the author's radar, but it's a very powerful web services based reporting tool that blows away any 3rd party tool in it's cost range (free). It comes with the complete Visual Studio interface, if you don't already have Visual Studio, and adds a half dozen project types for reports, SSIS, SSAS and so on. You have the power of .NET behind SSRS which means your options and data delivery/manipulation with SQL Server/Anaysis services/Integration services is almost limitless.
Post #836823
Posted Sunday, December 20, 2009 9:49 AM
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robert.goudie-497430 (12/18/2009)


BTW we still use DTS - despite having several books at work on SSIS that our key people have read at one point or another.

Thus far we have found DTS easier and more intuitive: SSIS takes a heap longer to achieve what comes intuitively in DTS, and this despite having no DTS documentation at all.


I use SSIS rather infrequently and when I come back to it I inevitably reinvent the whole Anglo-Saxon dictionary of biological insults and blasphemy. Once I get back into the swing of it I start to like it but should I have to get into the swing of it? Shouldn't it be more intuitive.

The particular gripe is the bit about changing package properties requiring them to be entered into a list in one of the components. There is a scripting equivalent that is supposed to negate this need but I've never got it to work.

I think SSIS will eventually evolve into something whose power is matched by an intuitive way of doing things but I personally I feel it has a way to go yet.

SQL2008 has one or two features that are in the "close but no cigar" camp. CDC looks good, until you have to factor in agile development changing the schema every 5 minutes.

Policy based management looks good but I want to audit naming conventions on fields.

Switch partitioning really rocks though!


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Post #836884
Posted Sunday, December 20, 2009 12:12 PM
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I'm not sure if this requires its own thread but--the only improvement I wanted to see is a simpler, more efficient Management Console which was foisted upon us in sql 2005.

SMS is so go*$#amn ridiculously slow and tedious. I mean, I counted at least 12 clicks and an unacceptable latency after each click just to add table permissions for a user!! Come on. In the old EM, in *TWO* clicks you were looking at a list of users and checkboxes to set permissions! This goes for so many once-simple management tasks. I don't know why they did this or if I'll have much agreement on this--but the SMS is so painful to use it just defies logic.

My two cents.
-Jim
Post #836906
Posted Sunday, December 20, 2009 12:29 PM
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Jim,
Are you sure your machine has the required specs for SQL Server 2005? I run the developer edition, which is obviously the Enterprise Edition w/ developer licensing, and I absolute love the new management studio. For starters, the new Visual Studio like design makes developing and performing Admin across all SQL modules obviously so much easier. I can have a connection open to the Database Engine, SSAS, SSRS and SSIS at the same time with no latency. My machine is an early 2008 HP laptop with a 2.5Ghz core 2 duo and 4 GB of 800Mhz RAM, so maybe I'm just more well equipped but even when running Vista I was zipping along at a more than fast enough clip. I am runing Windows 7 Professional and see some performance gain. It's really noticable at times, like when firing up often used apps.
As for teh number of clicks, I'm not sure I follow? I fire up SSMS and click once to connect (as you have to with EM) to the Database Engine, one click to open security and another for logins? Really not a lot of difference. The databases are inside of "databases" folder but that just makes sense and keeps the console organized. The solution explorer, and all other explorer windows are a God send.
I don't know anyone, besides you ;) that doesn't think SQL 2005 management studio is light years ahead of the 2000 UI.
Having query analyzer there, with tons of MDX and troubleshooting tools at your fingertips, as well as Admin tools is awesome. In the long run, the old EM required me anyway, many more clicks and really click count is not a good measure. When you click say 5 times, right in the same area of the screen w/o bringing up new windows and having to reoriant and now switch between windows (if you use SQL for more than one thing you end up with several windows on your task back and lot's for switching back and forth. I have said so long to that old school UI and love the console.
with respect,
Jerry
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