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Who Wants to Be Rich? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Saturday, October 18, 2008 1:50 PM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Who Wants to Be Rich?






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Post #588156
Posted Saturday, October 18, 2008 6:49 PM


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Exactly... ;)

--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

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Post #588194
Posted Saturday, October 18, 2008 7:51 PM


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I agree too.

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Post #588199
Posted Sunday, October 19, 2008 9:33 AM


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That's it? I wear you two out on the Financial Crisis poll :)







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Post #588260
Posted Sunday, October 19, 2008 11:24 AM


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Steve Jones - Editor (10/19/2008)
That's it? I wear you two out on the Financial Crisis poll :)

Uh, I'm busy sacrificing my time so that I can succeed... :D


-- RBarryYoung, (302)375-0451 blog: MovingSQL.com, Twitter: @RBarryYoung
Proactive Performance Solutions, Inc.
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Post #588271
Posted Sunday, October 19, 2008 11:33 AM


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It's interesting to see the wealth distributions in different countries. A similar evaluation was done here a couple years back, though I have serious doubts about it's accuracy. Mainly because of the massive unemployment and casual labour (without tax declarations) that we've got.

The evaluation basically showed that if a person can afford to own a car, then they're in the top 10% wealthiest people in the country. Owning a house as well put a person into the top 5%. It's scary to think about.

That said, cost of living is much lower here. I find the US to be an extremely expensive place to visit.



Gail Shaw
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Post #588278
Posted Sunday, October 19, 2008 11:19 PM


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One of my coworkers owns a trailer park. He has pointed out that some of his tenants are perfectly happy if their family life is working and they have enough money to cover the bills. Okay, those aren't his exact words, but that's what they translate to. The basic gist is they've got the basics covered and aren't worried about all that other stuff. The market downturn... what market downturn? It doesn't enter into their world so it's not important.


K. Brian Kelley, CISA, MCSE, Security+, MVP - SQL Server
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Post #588368
Posted Monday, October 20, 2008 1:49 AM


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I like that story about the violinist; it highlights one of the fundamental quid pro quos of life. If you want a car, you'll need to spend some money. If you want a Lambourghini, you'll need to spend a lot of money. If you want to play an instrument, you'll need to spend some time. If you want to be a virtuoso, you'll need to spend a lot of time. No gain without a price to pay.

Of course, the one major difference is that if you want more fancy cars, you just need to increase your income to cover the outgoings, whereas you can't change your overall allotment of time. If you want to be a virtuoso or a millionaire or a professional athlete or anything that requires high time and effort commitment, other areas of your life will lose out, and you have to live with that.

Me, I've worked out what are the most important priorities in my life, and spend my time accordingly on them. It means I'm comfortably off, but certainly not rich. It means I never come home to a house that'd pass the mother-in-law orderliness test. It means I don't have to schedule a "meeting" just to see my wife and kids. Perhaps I will start my own business at some stage, but only if it can be fitted in around my priorities.


Semper in excretia, sumus solum profundum variat
Post #588401
Posted Monday, October 20, 2008 2:35 AM


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I love the idea of having loads of money, having a great big house, not have to worry about whether we can afford to buy stuff every month, and giving my wife the option of giving up work.

But I would not want the money if it meant having to give up spending time with my wife and family, or doing a job that I don't enjoy. As things stand at the moment we're comfortable, even though we're having to rearrage our finances because we've just had a little'un.

At the end of the day there are more important things than money, and if you have to sacrifice your life for the sake of having some I'd have to ask the question - what's the point?

Of course that's not going to stop me having a little flutter every week on the lottery! ;)
Post #588416
Posted Monday, October 20, 2008 4:31 AM


Keeper of the Duck

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This link puts into perspective that sudden wealth isn't the answer. The problems which existed beforehand are still present and a whole host of new problems will likely beset us.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/70165/winning_the_lottery_curse_or_a_blessing.html

The quote that one third of lottery winners are bankrupt within a few short years is something I've heard before. I know that a young man who win a lottery here in the midlands of SC within a few short days was already having issues. It's sad that a lot of folks see money as an answer to their problems when in reality it's not.

As for that violin virtuoso, I've been thinking about that and I would have to disagree with him. I spent many a year playing flute and piccolo. While I was a decent player for my years, I was no virtuoso. And I practiced... a lot. Especially during 7th-10th and then my first two years of college. 11th-12th was interrupted due to an academic magnet school where there wasn't a music program. I even picked up trumpet to play jazz gigs. But while I became technically sound in my playing (which is what all that practice amounts to), there's a talent gap I would never have been able to bridge. I saw it quite clearly my senior year in college when we had a freshman trumpet player come in who had certainly put in the time to be really good. But when he played, there was just no comparison. You became a part of his solos. He could feel and understand the music in ways others couldn't. Yes, you must practice diligently to reach the full measure of your talent. But to be a virtuoso means you have talent the average hack doesn't, no matter how hard he or she tries.

EDIT: fixed typo


K. Brian Kelley, CISA, MCSE, Security+, MVP - SQL Server
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Author of Introduction to SQL Server: Basic Skills for Any SQL Server User
| Professional Development blog | Technical Blog | LinkedIn | Twitter
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