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Posted Wednesday, March 26, 2008 7:55 AM
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Good Morning

I have a few questions regarding training. We are going to wait to migrate to SQL Server 2008. I
was looking at training and I'm having a difficult time choosing what class to take. I am looking
at the SQL 2005 courses and trying to decide between 1) Maintaining a Microsoft SQL Server 2005
Database - Course 2780 and 2) Implementing a Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Database - Course 2779.

I will wait until these classes are available for SQL 2008, but I am wondering what the difference
is between these two classes. I have only one shot at the training and I want to get the most out of it.

History - I have been working with SQL 7, 2000, and am playing with 2005 Express for eight plus years. I am familiar with the basics and I know enough TSQL to get by. (I need to learn more!) We do not design databases here, but we are going to move eight instances over to a new server. I believe they want to use SQL 2008, and we are currently using SQL 2000.

Can anyone explain the differences between these two classes or could recommend another class to take?

I appreciate any help you can offer.

Regards,


Post #474722
Posted Wednesday, March 26, 2008 8:39 AM


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I'm not sure about either of those courses directly, but it does seem that the MS courses teach more to the exam than than the real world. If you have a dollar allocation, I'd look for a third party trainer to help you. (disclosure, I own part of End to End Training).

If it's a contract with a local trainer, and you have to use them, I'd pick the more advanced one.







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Post #474777
Posted Wednesday, March 26, 2008 8:58 AM
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Thanks, Steve. Actually, the school is AUM - Auburn University, Montgomery, Alabama Technicenter. It's a certified Microsoft training center. My experiences with these is that they "Read the Book" to you in class. As you mentioned, no real world training which is what I'm looking for. Not too much to choose from here. Most of the certified Microsoft training is the same. At lease the instructor is there to answer a few questions, but it's not customized for you.

Post #474810
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 5:04 AM
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Charlie,

The 2779 (Implementing) will go over many of the new services available within SQL2005 as compared to SQL2000, and will also talk about the programming objects. The 2780 (Administering) will touch on the features in the back end such as backup / restore, tuning, etc. If you are NOT going to be writing T-SQL code, I would focus on the Administration class, as the Implementation class deals mostly with coding issues.

Also, I will be very honest with you, many of the Microsoft instructors do not have any real world experience. I teach these classes for Microsoft's largest training partner, and have been an active professional DBA. I recommend that you find a Certified Partner that has an instructor that's "been there, done that".

Rich
Post #475309
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 1:14 PM
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Thanks, Rich. That's what I was looking for. Even though I won't primarily be programming, I'm the only one here who does the queries. I believe that the 2779 Implementing is what I'm looking for - the new stuff. I need information on SSIS, (creating DTS packages, etc.) which I don't have access to in the 2005 Express version. I'll wait to see what the equivalent classes will be for 2008.

I appreciate the input. Thanks,
Post #475682
Posted Friday, March 28, 2008 8:06 AM
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Charlie,

For the Certification process for SQL Server 2005, your first step to pass one exam to get you the MCTS: SQL Server 2005.

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For Classroom training, you will need 2 courses:

Course 2779: Implementing a Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Database

and
Course 2780: Maintaining a Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Database

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The exam you need to pass is:

Exam 70–431: TS: Microsoft SQL Server 2005 - Implementation and Maintenance

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There is a handy breakdown located here:

MCTS: SQL Server 2005 Certification Requirements
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcts/sql/default.mspx

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After you gain your MCTS: SQL Server 2005 you will most likely want to attain the next level of Certification, which is the MCITP "rank". For SQL Server there are two tracks. One for SQL Server 2005 DBA skills, and one for SQL Server 2005 Developer skills. Each track has a requirement of a total of 3 exams.

Note that the Exam 70–431: TS: Microsoft SQL Server 2005 - Implementation and Maintenance is a prerequisite for both tracks, meaning that you are 1/3 on your way to MCITP certification by passing the 70-431 exam.


See the links below for more details about each track:

MCITP: Database Administrator
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcitp/dbadmin/default.mspx

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MCITP: Database Developer Certification
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcitp/dbdev/default.mspx

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I would be more than happy to discuss the whole certification process in more detail, and can make (legal) recommendations about self-study or other materials that will help you with the foundation of knowledge you will need to master the topics covered for the exams.

Best of luck with your studies and keep us posted on your progress.

Best Regards,


"Key"
MCITP: DBA, MCSE, MCTS: SQL 2005, OCP
Post #476121
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