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HierarchyID Trees Expand / Collapse
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Posted Friday, March 14, 2008 12:11 AM
SSChampion

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Comments posted to this topic are about the item HierarchyID Trees
Post #469196
Posted Friday, March 14, 2008 11:35 AM


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In a tree repesentated by the hierarchy id, nodes are shown as /1/, /1/1/, /1/2/, /1/2/3/, etc. In this representation, what would the "2" repesent?
Choose your answer:
Nodes at the same level
Nodes in the same subtree
No particular meaning.

The answers listed make no sense in the context of the question asked.

The question is "..what would the "2" represent?" "2" is a singular item, that is not in comparison with anything in the question.

"Nodes at the same level" and "Nodes in the same subtree" are both plural nouns that draw a comparison between the multiple implied items. They cannot be the correct answer to the question because there is nothing in the question for "2" to be "at the same level" as or "in the same subtree" as.


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Post #469569
Posted Saturday, March 15, 2008 8:08 AM
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Can someone please explain this to me?

As far as my knowledge goes, the following tree
represents a possible implementation of the tree
posted by the author. Node /1/1/2/ has been
added since the author specified an incomplete
tree (as he used "etc.")
1
/ \
1 2
/ \
2 3

This should totally invalidate the proposed answer,
since "2 "(left side) is not in the same subtree tree
as "2" (right side).

Or did I miss something?

Thanks!


Best Regards,
Chris Büttner
Post #469821
Posted Saturday, March 15, 2008 9:16 AM


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There are 2 2's in the question example, so those are being compared.

In the representation, as Christian has shown, there could be two places 1/1/2 could be. However if I gave you two examples and asked to compare, they're both representing the same way. So the 2's would be at the same level. There would need to be a representation that showed how you break the left and right branches.







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Post #469830
Posted Saturday, March 15, 2008 1:45 PM
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Hi Steve,

What you are saying is, that the question was about
/1/, /1/1/, /1/2/, /1/2/3/

and not about
/1/, /1/1/, /1/2/, /1/2/3/, etc.
?

Thanks!


Best Regards,
Chris Büttner
Post #469891
Posted Friday, February 5, 2010 3:44 PM
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I realize this is an old question, but I'm killing time while waiting for a remote install to finish. This is a terribly worded question. The correct answer is that the 2 represents the second entry on the second level. As for the answers, it represents a node at the same level as it is the second node at a level. It also represents the parent of nodes in the same subtree, not the nodes themselves. The answer given, while one of three bad answers, is not the best response of those available.

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Post #860903
Posted Tuesday, January 4, 2011 3:55 PM


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Stefan Krzywicki (2/5/2010)
I realize this is an old question, but I'm killing time while waiting for a remote install to finish. This is a terribly worded question. The correct answer is that the 2 represents the second entry on the second level. As for the answers, it represents a node at the same level as it is the second node at a level. It also represents the parent of nodes in the same subtree, not the nodes themselves. The answer given, while one of three bad answers, is not the best response of those available.

I too am killing time, and reckon that this question and answer are appallingly bad. Essentially I agree with Stefan. The occurrences of "2" in the list of representations all represent the same node (the second node on the second level) which is not any of the options provided - all of which are wrong. Probably the answer given is the worst of the three wrong answers provided.


Tom
Post #1042747
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