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Posted Monday, February 25, 2008 10:10 PM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Type A, B, or C






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Post #460054
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 2:59 AM
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Hello Steve - quite an interesting article.

However, some nitty gritty from an INTJ (who is not supposed to be interested in detail, so I suppose I should also qualify my INTJ assertion with a "usually"). The Myers-Briggs (not Broggs) classification doesn't refer anywhere to a type of ITSJ, which you sometimes are - it is ISTJ. So maybe sometimes you are an "N" and not interested in detail, only the bigger picture.

;)
Post #460114
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 3:25 AM


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And this is one of the reasons I tend to distrust some psychological techniques.

Certainly there can be defining characteristics to someone, but shoehorning people into compartments to try to define them is, by its very nature, dangerous. You've shown this by describing how Type A and Type B categories don't do a good job of describing a particular person, but the article seems to suggest this is a mistake in the bounds of the compartment rather than the process of pigeonholing overall.

A bit of trivia for you; it wasn't until the 19th Century that there was such a thing as a homosexual. Before that time, homosexual acts certainly existed, but it was only at this point that society decided to start defining people according to their sexual preferences. A person (who, to a greater or lesser extent indulged in homosexual acts) suddenly became a homosexual. Now look at how polarised society has become as a result.


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Post #460125
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 4:07 AM
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We did something similar to this at work. What I found useful wasn't so much how it classified me (probably equivalent to an ISTJ - no surprise there), but the ancillary information about how to deal with other types of people.

After everyone was classified (and the results published within the team), it gave advice on how one type of person could modify their communication style when communicating with another type; how differences in personalities and styles could lead to misunderstandings, allowing everyone to be on the lookout for these.
Post #460133
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 6:26 AM
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Myers Briggs is one of the best things my wife and I ever did for our marriage. It really help us understand each other.
Post #460190
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 6:29 AM


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Andrew Watson (2/26/2008)
We did something similar to this at work. What I found useful wasn't so much how it classified me (probably equivalent to an ISTJ - no surprise there), but the ancillary information about how to deal with other types of people.

After everyone was classified (and the results published within the team), it gave advice on how one type of person could modify their communication style when communicating with another type; how differences in personalities and styles could lead to misunderstandings, allowing everyone to be on the lookout for these.


We do that where I work too. Everyone takes the TTI assessment as part of the application process, and everyone's results are available to everyone else. I found the results to be incredibly accurate in my case. We also meet with a leadership training coach to analyze our results, which I found to be very useful, even though I was highly skeptical going into it.

Drive and ambition have always been tough for me. I love being good at what I do, but work is only one aspect of my life. I'm lucky to work somewhere now that stresses life balance as part of their core values. It's a welcome change from some of the situations that I've found myself in previously.
Post #460193
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 6:43 AM
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The readers of SQL ServerCentral work in a binary world, so why have just refer to three types when we can use a nice round binary number of sixteen.

petertuffin and Andrew Watson mentioned about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types.

There are 16 different personality types in the Myers-Briggs classification of Personality Types with one choice from each of the categories below being the strongest:
Attitudes: Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I)
Information Gathering: Sensing (S) or Intuition (N)
Decision Making: Thinking (T) or Feeling (F)
Lifestyle: Judging (J) or Perceiving (P)

ISTJ | ISFJ | INFJ | INTJ
ISTP | ISFP | INFP | INTP
ESTP | ESFP | ENFP | ENTP
ESTJ | ESFJ | ENFJ | ENTJ

Below are some resources to look at for more information about Myers-Briggs and there are online personality tests available; just google "Myers-Briggs personality test".
http://www.myersbriggs.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myers-Briggs_Type_Indicator
An online personality test:
http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes2.asp

s/
INTP
Post #460202
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 6:48 AM
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D Smith (2/26/2008)

We do that where I work too. Everyone takes the TTI assessment as part of the application process, and everyone's results are available to everyone else. I found the results to be incredibly accurate in my case. We also meet with a leadership training coach to analyze our results, which I found to be very useful, even though I was highly skeptical going into it.

Drive and ambition have always been tough for me. I love being good at what I do, but work is only one aspect of my life. I'm lucky to work somewhere now that stresses life balance as part of their core values. It's a welcome change from some of the situations that I've found myself in previously.


One of the things stressed about the TTI is that is should not be used to make a hiring decision. There is no "right type", each has strengths and flaws.
Post #460205
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 9:05 AM
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I definitely agree that it's important to understand just how you are so that you can work with it. When I served on an editorial board in college, we had to take the Meyers-Briggs test just so that we knew what kind of personalities we were working with. It was definitely an eye-opener, but it made us a solid team as well, knowing how to play off of each other.

For those curious, I'm a borderline INTJ/INFJ.
Post #460312
Posted Tuesday, February 26, 2008 10:33 AM


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From a page on my site.

Personality Tests
I’m a sucker for these, which no doubt says something about my personality type, (Gullible?), so here are the results of a couple I did recently:

I'm ENTP/ESTP apparently....

Dave J




http://glossopian.co.uk/
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