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I am so depressed after I work on Question of the Day Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, January 28, 2008 8:09 PM
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I start my new job next week and the company is using SQL Server 2005. Since I have little experience in 2005 so I start reading books and articles in this website. Then for the last few days I started doing the question of the day. I only got about 50% right and most of the time I had to search the internet or the books for answers. I am so scared about my new job since I will be the DBA, developer, data architect... pretty much I have to do everything. Now I completely lose my confidence.
I thought I was pretty good at SQL Server, but with all the new changes in SQL Server 2005 and starting a new job and new role, I am totally lost!

Maybe working for Walmart is not so bad after all!!!!!!!
Post #448665
Posted Tuesday, January 29, 2008 2:05 AM


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Hi Loner,

If you think about it, when you've been looking things up on the internet you've been learning more and more about SQL Server 2005; probably without realising. You should take each question you get wrong and research the hows and whys of that particular area. It's a great way of making your SS2005 studies modular and varied.

You'll also learn a hell of a lot more when you start your job and you'll probably even amaze yourself at how much and how quickly you pick it up. There's no equivalent to practical experience!!

Good luck with the new job.




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Post #448730
Posted Tuesday, January 29, 2008 8:00 AM


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The point of the question is to get you to think and maybe look at something new with SQL Server. If you knew all the answers, it wouldn't be fun.

I look for obscure things, little things, but I try to keep them related to something that could come up in your job. By going through them, as mentioned above, you're getting practice in case you have to handle it at work.

NO ONE knows everything about SQL Server 2005. It's just too big. Learn what you can, don't panic, and keep going. Think of it this way, all this learning will help you when something comes up. Even if you don't know about it, you'll know how to research it.







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Post #448865
Posted Tuesday, January 29, 2008 8:47 AM


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Are you kidding? I skip the ones that I know I don't know and I'm still only batting about 58%. Lighten up on yourself just a bit.

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Post #448908
Posted Tuesday, January 29, 2008 8:56 AM


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I agree - there are lots of questions that are highly detailed in nature, that unless you happen to work with a LOT, you're going to have trouble remembering. It's very good in my mind, especially since it DOES tend to keep us humble....

Throwing little interesting tidbits your way, forcing some amount of research, seeing something odd/new that might end up being useful - all really good stuff...

And the point is - at your job, you're going to implement things you're familiar with, and if you're not 100% confident, you will be double-checking the answer before throwing something out there. No one said you'd need to implement EVERY feature included in SQL server: if you only use 25% of the features, but you can do everything you need to with that 25%, who cares? You got the job done.



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Your lack of planning does not constitute an emergency on my part...unless you're my manager...or a director and above...or a really loud-spoken end-user..All right - what was my emergency again?
Post #448916
Posted Tuesday, January 29, 2008 5:25 PM


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I get probably 20 - 25% correct at max. But every time I get one wrong, I read the reasons I got it wrong and make a mental note not to forget that in the future.

Hey, it's one way to learn SQL Server. @=)

And sometimes I cheat by opening up BOL and trying to find the answer by digging through the articles before I actually answer the question. (Not that it usually helps). @=)



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Post #449135
Posted Wednesday, January 30, 2008 6:20 AM
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Consider this, most of the people at your new job probably know LESS than you do about SQL Server 2005. In my experience, the best way to learn about something is just getting down in the trenches and working with it. You can read entire volumes of information, but until you really have to solve a problem and go out and find an answer to it, how much of that knowledge to you retain?

Just go in with confidence and don't let anyone see you sweat. No one knows everything about everything, that is why there are references. There is no shame in not knowing an answer as long as you have the wherewithal to go out and FIND the answer.


If it was easy, everybody would be doing it!;)
Post #449320
Posted Wednesday, January 30, 2008 11:06 PM
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I'll echo a couple of the other responses here with a bit of a twist. Many years ago in boot camp for the U.S. Marines I was taught that the only acceptable answer to a question to which you don't know the answer is "I don't know but I will find it (or out)!"

Quite frankly there are just too many things to "know" about SQL Server, Windows, etc. for anyone to remember/know "everything" - there is no shame in telling someone that you'll have to get back to them after some research.

Joe



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Posted Thursday, January 31, 2008 4:05 AM


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That's an old Customer Service / Retail adage too. You never tell your customer "I don't know" or risk losing their business. You always make an effort to discover the answer or find the customer someone who has the answer.

Apparently it's so rarely done in IT around my parts, though, that it really impresses the bosses when you "go that extra mile". You could earn mucho brownie points by using that response, Loner. As long as you follow up, of course.


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Post #449861
Posted Thursday, January 31, 2008 9:51 AM
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If you've proven yourself on just about any db architecure you should be fine. IMHO, this job is the ability to find answers (on the internet and in books), and be able to apply them. No one that I know can put the whole of the technology into their brain and pull out at will. Always thought closed book tests were dumb when syntax was being tested. Not at all real life. I've never had one situation since school (long time ago) that forced me to memorize syntax...

BTW, 1.5 years ago I was in a similar situation - no SQL2005 (sybase and sql2000) with the prior couple years mostly beuracratic work. Then straight to data architect, one-man show for software development house. I wasn't real confident, but knew I had succeeded in the past and knew how to work hard. Confidence was shaky (also getting older) , but ignored those thoughts and did my best anyway.

I would suggest when you get there to find some "low hanging fruit". Some issues that they want solved, that you can fairly quickly resolve. Don't try to tackle everything at once. Don't automatically tackle the first thing they throw at you - if possible gather multiple issues and then determine which one(s) you can solve quickly. A problematic query or whatever. This will help help you gain some respect early on.

Don't lose hope, look at this as a challenge, work hard, and you might be suprised at what you can accomplish - ONE DAY AT A TIME!

kind of a you-rah note, but a few of my close friends did the same for me when my thinkin got a little stinkin

btw, I really like 2005 - much more than any other sybase or ms versions I've worked on.

jg
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