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The Basics of Cryptology Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, July 25, 2005 6:49 PM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the content posted at http://www.sqlservercentral.com/columnists/mcoles/thebasicsofcryptology.asp
Post #204270
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 2:12 AM
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Nice article.
An excellent book on the whole subject is "The Code Book" by Simon Singh ISBN: 0385495323. (I think he also presented a four-part miniseries on Channel4 UK on the subject). It is more of a history book than a techie book but does explain how all of the codes/ ciphers work including the Enigma (with diagrams!)



Post #208973
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 2:12 AM
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Great article.  Nice to see a not so SQL-intensive article, but still showing how SQL can be used in this context.  Good stuff
Post #208974
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 2:33 AM
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Good Read.

I don't know much on the subject and found it very interesting, think you've inspired me to find out abit more.

Thanks,

Chris.

Post #208982
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 5:36 AM
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The title of the article mentions the word "cryptology," yet the article discusses "cryptography." Similar yet distinctly different words.

I got confused, so I did some quick web searching. For those who desire further illucidation, this is what I found:

From Google:

The science of cryptology is the science of secure communications.

From Wikipedia:

The study of how to circumvent the use of cryptography is called cryptanalysis, or codebreaking. Cryptography and cryptanalysis are sometimes grouped together under the umbrella term cryptology, encompassing the entire subject.

Craig



Post #209013
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 7:39 AM


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Yes, I forgot to add a title when I submitted it, so Cryptology was added to the title afterwards.  Cryptology includes both Cryptography (securing messages) and Cryptanalysis (defeating cryptography/"codebreaking").  I think the title was probably chosen because it covers both Cryptography and Cryptanalysis, although I do focus more on the Cryptography side.

Thanks!

Post #209078
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 7:51 AM


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Thanks for the reference!  I read Singh's book myself a few years ago and found it very entertaining and informative.  If I recall correctly, he also discusses the future of cryptology:  'quantum cryptology'.  Unfortunately I've lost my copy (I think I loaned it to someone and never got it back), so I didn't reference it for this article; but I'd definitely recommend it to anyone who wants to know more about the history of cryptology.  Here's a link to it at Amazon:  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0385495323/qid=1123680339/sr=8-2/ref=pd_bbs_sbs_2/103-0153168-7501472?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

He also has another book, "Fermat's Enigma", about how one of the world's hardest mathematical problems was solved.  It's very good as well.  Here's that link:  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0385493622/qid=1123680339/sr=8-3/ref=pd_bbs_sbs_3/103-0153168-7501472?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Thanks again!

Post #209086
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 8:42 AM


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A typo was discovered by Douglas Chrystall in the article.  In the section on Asymmetric Encryption, I wrote:

"You encrypt a message with your public key, and it can be decrypted by the receiver using your publicly available public key and their private key."

I meant to write:

"You encrypt a message with the receiver's public key, and it can be decrypted by the receiver using their private key."

Thanks for the catch Douglas!

 

Post #209123
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 2:08 PM
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Nice intro to a very complex field.
I particularly enjoyed your timeline image. 

Another further reading book I would add for those who love details is

Making, Breaking CODES: An Introduction to Cryptology.  ISBN 0-13-030369-0
http://vig.prenhall.com/catalog/academic/product/0,1144,0130303690,00.html

Another good book like the The Code Book mention in an earlier post is:

Crypto: How the Code Rebels Beat the Government Saving Privacy in the Digital Age. 

I find it goes into more details about the break through of Asymmetric Encryption how its relevant to the key distribution problem.

 

 

Post #209285
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 2:47 PM
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If Douglas hadn't caught it, I would have mentioned your public/private error.  In your image, (Figure 4) you have "Marian Rejewski beings work...1932" That would be "...begins work..."

OK SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) doesn't involve SQL directly, but I'm a little surprised you didn't include that in your Asymmetric Key section, because it is a heavy user of this technology to encript client data that may eventually be stored in a SQL DB.

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