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Mapping Database File Objects and Fragmentation Expand / Collapse
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Posted Sunday, October 12, 2003 12:00 AM
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Comments posted to this topic are about the content posted at http://www.sqlservercentral.com/columnists/ckempster/mappingdatabasefileobjectsandfragmentation.asp


Chris Kempster
www.chriskempster.com
Author of "SQL Server Backup, Recovery & Troubleshooting"
Author of "SQL Server 2k for the Oracle DBA"
Post #17193
Posted Thursday, October 16, 2003 12:27 AM


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"...interesting maps for the DBA to ponder on heavy OLTP database schemas..." There is a lot of work here, but what is the point? I'm a DBA who prefers to know as little as I need to know about bits and bytes, so I can concentrate on best modeling of business processes to database design. As the author states at the beginning of the article, some would argue that this look under the covers is not necessary. Meanwhile, is there garbage/redundant data in these tables that are moving around the disk space? Do the owners of the data understand all they have out there? Is there some data migrated from a legacy system that no user ever queries, that could be archived and deleted from the active database? Do you have a data dictionary and are you keeping it current? Are you more interested in the DBMS than the databases? Do you want to work for Microsoft on the SQL Server development team?




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Post #83012
Posted Thursday, October 16, 2003 1:12 AM
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Hi there

Good point actually! :) I was more interested in the underlying architecture of SQL Server purely from a "i wonder" point of view initially. I also like to match up the hearsay that sets bantered around the internet re SQL Server in relation to object storage, show contig, read-ahead ops, shrinking etc, so the mapper was a way to seeing what really happens.

As I also do oracle work, the tool actually makes sence in this space, so it was a good learning experience once again in SQL Server.

Cheers

Ck









Chris Kempster
www.chriskempster.com
Author of "SQL Server 2k for the Oracle DBA"



Chris Kempster
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Author of "SQL Server Backup, Recovery & Troubleshooting"
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Post #83013
Posted Thursday, October 16, 2003 1:51 AM
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Chris,
I know there's a couple of products on the market that already do this sort of thing (can't remember the names off the top of my head, I know one of them's from Australia). Very interesting article though, it's certainly given me some useful insights into the inner workings of the SQL Server storage mechanisms. Not enough info out there like this for those of us who want to know these sort of intricacies - keep up the good work :)

Jon Reade

Edited by - jonreade on 10/16/2003 01:56:13 AM



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Post #83014
Posted Thursday, October 16, 2003 4:42 AM
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I tend to avoid bits and bytes myself, but a graphical view of space used would be a helpful tool. Nice write up Chris - good to have some variety!

Andy
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/columnists/awarren/




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Post #83015
Posted Thursday, October 16, 2003 9:29 AM


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Ditto the comment that I'm not sure this really matters to me, but it is interesting to see how SQL deal with space.

I'd be curious to see this graphically, but I'm not sure I have time to actually analyze the issues. Might help identify fragmentation more easily.

Steve Jones
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Post #83016
Posted Friday, October 17, 2003 6:22 AM
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I like the idea of this tool.

I tend to do a DBCC DBREINDEX on a regular basis, which is probably a bit OTT.

The only time I looked at a DBCC ShowContig was 5 years ago on the SQL 6.5 course and wouldn't know how to interpret it now. I suspect I should look at it more regularly but I tend to DBCC DBREINDEX quite frequently.



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Post #83017
Posted Friday, October 17, 2003 11:24 AM
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Great article. I'm one of those who like to know about the bits and bytes. The only things I would add, is probably doing a full offline De-frag (i.e unload all tables, load each table back, one by one) now one can afford this now, but if we're at it, I would do that to show how clean the database would look.
Anyway, great work, impressive.




Post #83018
Posted Sunday, October 19, 2003 2:40 AM


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This would be a very useful tool. We run MSSQL pretty much to its' limit and out there the bits and byte of the storage really do matter.

I find the Oracle vs SQL debate is a bit like Linux vs Windows. I used to use Linux when a I messed about with computers as a hobby and didn't mind the huge amount of micro-management I had to do. Now I work with computers I just want to get the job done and am prepared to put up with a slightly more powerful box required to run that damn paperclip! At the bleeding edge they all turn back into micro-management jobs and it's good to know where to get at that info in the MS, although most of us would prefer to never have to.

Keith Henry
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Post #83019
Posted Sunday, October 19, 2003 2:41 AM


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PS: and one more thing. Who is going to write this tool then? Any offers?

Keith Henry
DBA/Developer/BI Manager





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According to everyone I know I "do something with computers?" for a living, so there you go.
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