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Estimated time to complete the query. Expand / Collapse
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Posted Wednesday, August 6, 2014 9:24 AM
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Hi friends,

I am running an update query.
It is taking long time. To find the estimated completion time i checked sys.dm_exec_request or sys.dm_exec_session or sp_who2 but there is no clue. It is showing as zero.
can any one help on this please.


Regards,
SAM


Regards,
SAM
***Share your knowledge.It’s a way to achieve immortality----Dalai Lama***
Post #1600285
Posted Wednesday, August 6, 2014 11:58 AM


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samking (8/6/2014)
Hi friends,

I am running an update query.
It is taking long time. To find the estimated completion time i checked sys.dm_exec_request or sys.dm_exec_session or sp_who2 but there is no clue. It is showing as zero.
can any one help on this please.


Regards,
SAM


Post the query, please. There's a typcial problem that many folks write into their update queries without knowing about it. To summarize the problem, if the UPDATE contains a JOIN, the target table MUST absolutely appear in the FROM clause. Using tablename.columnname is NOT sufficient and that form of UPDATE never appears in Books Online.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
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Post #1600337
Posted Wednesday, August 6, 2014 12:05 PM


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There's no estimated completion for queries, that's for things like backups.

No way to tell how long the query will take other than to run it and see.



Gail Shaw
Microsoft Certified Master: SQL Server 2008, MVP
SQL In The Wild: Discussions on DB performance with occasional diversions into recoverability

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Post #1600341
Posted Friday, August 8, 2014 6:54 AM
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Hi GailMosnter..
Thanks for the reply. After surfing google i came to know that we can find the estimation time for any update insert or other queries.
We can know the estimated time only for backup and restore.

Regards,
SAM


Regards,
SAM
***Share your knowledge.It’s a way to achieve immortality----Dalai Lama***
Post #1601149
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