Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 12345»»»

Frustration with Bad Design Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Saturday, July 26, 2014 11:03 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Saturday, December 20, 2014 3:11 PM
Points: 31,368, Visits: 15,837
Comments posted to this topic are about the item Frustration with Bad Design






Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #1596517
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 1:05 AM
SSC Journeyman

SSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC Journeyman

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, December 12, 2014 3:48 AM
Points: 97, Visits: 306
State your objections and either support the chosen path or find another job.

I fully agree with you and that's what I did earlier ... however most of the people never go for either option. Instead they prefer argueing endlessly on the poor décisions that were taken, spoiling the mood of the department. And again you face both options: you stay or you leave. But for the time being, finding another job is not as easy as 25 years ago when I started ...
Post #1596701
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 2:58 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, December 23, 2014 5:52 PM
Points: 5,831, Visits: 3,751
I work as a freelancer so sometimes I have access to people or more kudos than the full time staff (sometimes completely the opposite).

Regardless of the situation, I highlight any concerns through the appropriate channels, I ensure that I document the issue(s) along with my response to it/them and leave it to the appropriate people and processes to deal with it. When necessary and applicable I will remind the appropriate people of such things being outstanding (even if it is unpopular). Apart from that, I have done all that is required of me and all that is open to me.

Anything beyond that leaves myself at risk to accusations of all sorts; hacking, wasting company time, breach of contract etc.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1596732
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 6:20 AM
Say Hey Kid

Say Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey Kid

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, December 22, 2014 5:46 AM
Points: 708, Visits: 1,790
I'm taking option 2, Steve. Goals are set, plans are in place, nights are spent working on skills and such.

Currently there are enough shops, companies and corporations demanding our talents that we can be picky. We should professionally let our colleagues know that certain companies may not meet their expectations, either through networking or sites like Glass Door.
Post #1596802
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 6:36 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, December 23, 2014 5:52 PM
Points: 5,831, Visits: 3,751
chrisn-585491 (7/28/2014)
I'm taking option 2, Steve. Goals are set, plans are in place, nights are spent working on skills and such.

Currently there are enough shops, companies and corporations demanding our talents that we can be picky. We should professionally let our colleagues know that certain companies may not meet their expectations, either through networking or sites like Glass Door.


There is a company that I have worked for in the past that I only heard of their reputation after I accepted a position there. I performed as well as was possible within the regime there and I was determined to make up my own mind. Trouble is that I agreed with almost everything I had been told about the place.

On the plus side I am a freelancer so eventually we parted ways. I made an effort not to burn bridges although I responsibly fulfilled my professional duty internally highlighting issues that they had and/or would have to the appropriate staff. I don't think that this made me very popular so unless they have a change in management I think that I am safe from returning.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1596807
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 6:44 AM
Say Hey Kid

Say Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey Kid

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, December 22, 2014 5:46 AM
Points: 708, Visits: 1,790
BTW, I've refused interviews with two companies just because of negative Glass Door reviews that were followed up by personal inquires among the local community.

If more people were professionally forthcoming about their experiences, maybe so many of us wouldn't have to take a tour of duty in a "Bad Place".
Post #1596814
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 6:58 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 4:23 PM
Points: 35,821, Visits: 32,494
From the article:
However it's usually not your company, and it's not your place to prove that there is a flaw in a system. It's especially true that it's not your place to prove things without having been given permission to do so. Proving a point on your own is something children do, not professionals.


I totally disagree as written above especially when it comes to private information such a Social Security Numbers. It MUST be proven if it exists and action must be taken. I consider it to be one of those unwritten laws that is the responsibility of every IT worker.

I DO, however, totally disagree with the manner in which David Helkowski did his proof. There's no way in hell that I'd prove a security violation by violating someone's privacy by posting their hacked SSN on something like Reddit. A private email to that person should have sufficed. If no action was taken to fix the security problem, then there are proper channels to certain agencies to correctly and properly report such a problem.

So, with mixed emotion, I applaud David Helkowski for all of his actions EXCEPT for posting private information on a very public website. I say "mixed emotion" because, on the other hand, he's getting what he deserved for being too freakin' lazy to do things the right way.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1596824
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 7:04 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, December 23, 2014 5:52 PM
Points: 5,831, Visits: 3,751
chrisn-585491 (7/28/2014)
BTW, I've refused interviews with two companies just because of negative Glass Door reviews that were followed up by personal inquires among the local community.

If more people were professionally forthcoming about their experiences, maybe so many of us wouldn't have to take a tour of duty in a "Bad Place".


Don't forget that there is likely to be a legal issue in doing that. Formally posting something somewhere can leave oneself open to being sued (slander and/or libel) or getting a reputation for "slagging off" companies. There is a balance to made and I think that personal enquiries within ones own network is best.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1596828
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 7:08 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, December 23, 2014 5:52 PM
Points: 5,831, Visits: 3,751
Jeff Moden (7/28/2014)
From the article:
However it's usually not your company, and it's not your place to prove that there is a flaw in a system. It's especially true that it's not your place to prove things without having been given permission to do so. Proving a point on your own is something children do, not professionals.


I totally disagree as written above especially when it comes to private information such a Social Security Numbers. It MUST be proven if it exists and action must be taken. I consider it to be one of those unwritten laws that is the responsibility of every IT worker.

I DO, however, totally disagree with the manner in which David Helkowski did his proof. There's no way in hell that I'd prove a security violation by violating someone's privacy by posting their hacked SSN on something like Reddit. A private email to that person should have sufficed. If no action was taken to fix the security problem, then there are proper channels to certain agencies to correctly and properly report such a problem.

So, with mixed emotion, I applaud David Helkowski for all of his actions EXCEPT for posting private information on a very public website. I say "mixed emotion" because, on the other hand, he's getting what he deserved for being too freakin' lazy to do things the right way.


Agree. His simplest mistake was his biggest, in my opinion. When he raised the issue internally he did not ensure that the person he informed took responsibility of informing the client nor did take on that responsibility himself. Had that one thing been clear then it would never has escalated for him.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1596836
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 7:10 AM
SSC Journeyman

SSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC Journeyman

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, December 12, 2014 3:48 AM
Points: 97, Visits: 306
Jeff Moden (7/28/2014)

I totally disagree as written above especially when it comes to private information such a Social Security Numbers. It MUST be proven if it exists and action must be taken. I consider it to be one of those unwritten laws that is the responsibility of every IT worker.

I had a training 10ish years ago about money laundry. After a while I wondered why I was sitting there; I had no contact with customers nor with Financial institutes, so what? "Except that you are one of the first persons who can see strange behaviours in the data! These need to be reported immediately to your compliance officer" was the answer.
The same applies to security and you may be held for responsible if you do not report it. Now it's up to the management to decide what to do ...
Post #1596839
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 12345»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse