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Do you usually go to agencies? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 1:17 PM
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Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
The problem with going to employers directly is actually knowing what employers are currently looking for talent. You can't always go be job boards or the want ads. Some employers rely specifically on agencies to prescreen potential candidates for positions since there seems to be hundreds of people applying for limited openings.

In addition, having talked with recruiters, they are constantly talking with client firms looking to determine if they may be getting ready to fill potential opens to give them time to start looking for potential recruits, or to give people they work with a heads up about new openings if their current positions are winding down. The good recruiters will even touch base with even when you aren't currently active to see how things are going for you.


This is true, but you could also find the employer through the agency by searching keywords when the agency itself posts the job on the job boards.
Post #1597040
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 1:41 PM


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xsevensinzx (7/28/2014)
Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
The problem with going to employers directly is actually knowing what employers are currently looking for talent. You can't always go be job boards or the want ads. Some employers rely specifically on agencies to prescreen potential candidates for positions since there seems to be hundreds of people applying for limited openings.

In addition, having talked with recruiters, they are constantly talking with client firms looking to determine if they may be getting ready to fill potential opens to give them time to start looking for potential recruits, or to give people they work with a heads up about new openings if their current positions are winding down. The good recruiters will even touch base with even when you aren't currently active to see how things are going for you.


This is true, but you could also find the employer through the agency by searching keywords when the agency itself posts the job on the job boards.


In my experience, agencies do not post the name of companies they are representing when they post positions on their sites or career sites like Monster, Dice, or Career Builder. If they did, people could apply directly instead of going through them costing them their commissions. In fact, they usually don't tell you the company until they have presented you to the company as a potential employee which also means you have agreed to allow them to represent you. Along with this there is a time frame in which you cannot represent yourself to that same company without having to pay some form a financial remuneration if you should be offered a position with that company. The contracts I have signed I believe that has been one year, but of course your milage may vary.



Lynn Pettis

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Post #1597045
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 7:09 PM
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Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
xsevensinzx (7/28/2014)
Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
The problem with going to employers directly is actually knowing what employers are currently looking for talent. You can't always go be job boards or the want ads. Some employers rely specifically on agencies to prescreen potential candidates for positions since there seems to be hundreds of people applying for limited openings.

In addition, having talked with recruiters, they are constantly talking with client firms looking to determine if they may be getting ready to fill potential opens to give them time to start looking for potential recruits, or to give people they work with a heads up about new openings if their current positions are winding down. The good recruiters will even touch base with even when you aren't currently active to see how things are going for you.


This is true, but you could also find the employer through the agency by searching keywords when the agency itself posts the job on the job boards.


In my experience, agencies do not post the name of companies they are representing when they post positions on their sites or career sites like Monster, Dice, or Career Builder. If they did, people could apply directly instead of going through them costing them their commissions. In fact, they usually don't tell you the company until they have presented you to the company as a potential employee which also means you have agreed to allow them to represent you. Along with this there is a time frame in which you cannot represent yourself to that same company without having to pay some form a financial remuneration if you should be offered a position with that company. The contracts I have signed I believe that has been one year, but of course your milage may vary.


That's all true, but it depends on the agencies and the opportunity. Unless it's fresh off the press, most organizations have had the position listed on their website and using agencies to headhunt. I've managed to find good leads from one agencies post on a public website to the direct hire because of the duration it takes to sometimes fill these roles. Other times, subtle hints on the organization, if you know your local area, also lead to it.

I don't know what agencies you talk with, but for me, I always ask for the company name within the first discussion. This is not to go behind the agency in any way. It's to ensure that the agency as well potential employer knows that I'm not just there for a paycheck, I'm there for a project too. Otherwise, it's the end of the discussion. There is no way that I am wasting time and finding out later who the winning company is.
Post #1597131
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 7:34 PM


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xsevensinzx (7/28/2014)
Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
xsevensinzx (7/28/2014)
Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
The problem with going to employers directly is actually knowing what employers are currently looking for talent. You can't always go be job boards or the want ads. Some employers rely specifically on agencies to prescreen potential candidates for positions since there seems to be hundreds of people applying for limited openings.

In addition, having talked with recruiters, they are constantly talking with client firms looking to determine if they may be getting ready to fill potential opens to give them time to start looking for potential recruits, or to give people they work with a heads up about new openings if their current positions are winding down. The good recruiters will even touch base with even when you aren't currently active to see how things are going for you.


This is true, but you could also find the employer through the agency by searching keywords when the agency itself posts the job on the job boards.


In my experience, agencies do not post the name of companies they are representing when they post positions on their sites or career sites like Monster, Dice, or Career Builder. If they did, people could apply directly instead of going through them costing them their commissions. In fact, they usually don't tell you the company until they have presented you to the company as a potential employee which also means you have agreed to allow them to represent you. Along with this there is a time frame in which you cannot represent yourself to that same company without having to pay some form a financial remuneration if you should be offered a position with that company. The contracts I have signed I believe that has been one year, but of course your milage may vary.


That's all true, but it depends on the agencies and the opportunity. Unless it's fresh off the press, most organizations have had the position listed on their website and using agencies to headhunt. I've managed to find good leads from one agencies post on a public website to the direct hire because of the duration it takes to sometimes fill these roles. Other times, subtle hints on the organization, if you know your local area, also lead to it.

I don't know what agencies you talk with, but for me, I always ask for the company name within the first discussion. This is not to go behind the agency in any way. It's to ensure that the agency as well potential employer knows that I'm not just there for a paycheck, I'm there for a project too. Otherwise, it's the end of the discussion. There is no way that I am wasting time and finding out later who the winning company is.


I've developed the same trust with the agencies that work with, as I'm sure that many have. Of course, there are a whole lot of people that can't be trusted with such information and that's why it takes a while to build up such a trust.


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Post #1597136
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 7:48 PM


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xsevensinzx (7/28/2014)
Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
xsevensinzx (7/28/2014)
Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
The problem with going to employers directly is actually knowing what employers are currently looking for talent. You can't always go be job boards or the want ads. Some employers rely specifically on agencies to prescreen potential candidates for positions since there seems to be hundreds of people applying for limited openings.

In addition, having talked with recruiters, they are constantly talking with client firms looking to determine if they may be getting ready to fill potential opens to give them time to start looking for potential recruits, or to give people they work with a heads up about new openings if their current positions are winding down. The good recruiters will even touch base with even when you aren't currently active to see how things are going for you.


This is true, but you could also find the employer through the agency by searching keywords when the agency itself posts the job on the job boards.


In my experience, agencies do not post the name of companies they are representing when they post positions on their sites or career sites like Monster, Dice, or Career Builder. If they did, people could apply directly instead of going through them costing them their commissions. In fact, they usually don't tell you the company until they have presented you to the company as a potential employee which also means you have agreed to allow them to represent you. Along with this there is a time frame in which you cannot represent yourself to that same company without having to pay some form a financial remuneration if you should be offered a position with that company. The contracts I have signed I believe that has been one year, but of course your milage may vary.


That's all true, but it depends on the agencies and the opportunity. Unless it's fresh off the press, most organizations have had the position listed on their website and using agencies to headhunt. I've managed to find good leads from one agencies post on a public website to the direct hire because of the duration it takes to sometimes fill these roles. Other times, subtle hints on the organization, if you know your local area, also lead to it.

I don't know what agencies you talk with, but for me, I always ask for the company name within the first discussion. This is not to go behind the agency in any way. It's to ensure that the agency as well potential employer knows that I'm not just there for a paycheck, I'm there for a project too. Otherwise, it's the end of the discussion. There is no way that I am wasting time and finding out later who the winning company is.


The agencies I have worked with do tell me the company, but they also know I won't go behind their backs and apply directly. This is due to trust built over months and sometimes years.

A few I have worked with wouldn't disclose to me the company name until I had signed an agreement with them. I don't work with those agencies any more, not because of the companies they sent me to for interviews but because of their own practices.



Lynn Pettis

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Post #1597137
Posted Tuesday, July 29, 2014 9:22 AM
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I have not had very good luck with agencies in the Mid-South (US).
Seems that very few (that I have had dealings with) take the time to find a job that is within your skill set or that you are interested in.
I have had them call me about Java jobs because I took a Java class in college.
Or, they send my resume to a company (without my consent) for a windows systems administrator position. I am not a sys. admin and sure as hell don't want to ever be a windows sys. admin. UGH!

Most of the recruiters/agencies in the area refuse to disclose who the client is. I've gotten very good at figuring out who the client is by how insane (ie. writing a job description for a H1B slot) the job/knowledge requirements are.

There are quite a few IT jobs in my area, but many of them are from the same 4 local companies that go through non-H1B staff like crazy. After you have been through one or two of these companies you learn better and find more reasonable employment.
Post #1597352
Posted Tuesday, July 29, 2014 10:00 AM


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Jeff Moden (7/28/2014)
xsevensinzx (7/28/2014)
Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
xsevensinzx (7/28/2014)
Lynn Pettis (7/28/2014)
The problem with going to employers directly is actually knowing what employers are currently looking for talent. You can't always go be job boards or the want ads. Some employers rely specifically on agencies to prescreen potential candidates for positions since there seems to be hundreds of people applying for limited openings.

In addition, having talked with recruiters, they are constantly talking with client firms looking to determine if they may be getting ready to fill potential opens to give them time to start looking for potential recruits, or to give people they work with a heads up about new openings if their current positions are winding down. The good recruiters will even touch base with even when you aren't currently active to see how things are going for you.


This is true, but you could also find the employer through the agency by searching keywords when the agency itself posts the job on the job boards.


In my experience, agencies do not post the name of companies they are representing when they post positions on their sites or career sites like Monster, Dice, or Career Builder. If they did, people could apply directly instead of going through them costing them their commissions. In fact, they usually don't tell you the company until they have presented you to the company as a potential employee which also means you have agreed to allow them to represent you. Along with this there is a time frame in which you cannot represent yourself to that same company without having to pay some form a financial remuneration if you should be offered a position with that company. The contracts I have signed I believe that has been one year, but of course your milage may vary.


That's all true, but it depends on the agencies and the opportunity. Unless it's fresh off the press, most organizations have had the position listed on their website and using agencies to headhunt. I've managed to find good leads from one agencies post on a public website to the direct hire because of the duration it takes to sometimes fill these roles. Other times, subtle hints on the organization, if you know your local area, also lead to it.

I don't know what agencies you talk with, but for me, I always ask for the company name within the first discussion. This is not to go behind the agency in any way. It's to ensure that the agency as well potential employer knows that I'm not just there for a paycheck, I'm there for a project too. Otherwise, it's the end of the discussion. There is no way that I am wasting time and finding out later who the winning company is.


I've developed the same trust with the agencies that work with, as I'm sure that many have. Of course, there are a whole lot of people that can't be trusted with such information and that's why it takes a while to build up such a trust.


+1




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Post #1597379
Posted Tuesday, July 29, 2014 10:56 AM
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podmate (7/29/2014)
I have not had very good luck with agencies in the Mid-South (US).
Seems that very few (that I have had dealings with) take the time to find a job that is within your skill set or that you are interested in.
I have had them call me about Java jobs because I took a Java class in college.
Or, they send my resume to a company (without my consent) for a windows systems administrator position. I am not a sys. admin and sure as hell don't want to ever be a windows sys. admin. UGH!

Most of the recruiters/agencies in the area refuse to disclose who the client is. I've gotten very good at figuring out who the client is by how insane (ie. writing a job description for a H1B slot) the job/knowledge requirements are.

There are quite a few IT jobs in my area, but many of them are from the same 4 local companies that go through non-H1B staff like crazy. After you have been through one or two of these companies you learn better and find more reasonable employment.


In my experience, one must read all the print (large, medium, fine, ultra fine and steganographic), under no circumstances should the agency be authorized to send any details without an approval. As one normally deals with more than one agency at the time, having multiple submissions for a contract/position is a risk and if it happens, it doesn't look good.
Post #1597409
Posted Tuesday, July 29, 2014 12:07 PM


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Eirikur Eiriksson (7/29/2014)


under no circumstances should the agency be authorized to send any details without an approval.


Agencies send candidates all the time without approval. I have seen agencies even doctor up resumes for a candidate with my resume or other people that I know really well. It is always a riot when the agency then submits said resume to you for their candidate - and it is your resume.




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Post #1597448
Posted Tuesday, July 29, 2014 12:43 PM


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SQLRNNR (7/29/2014)
Eirikur Eiriksson (7/29/2014)


under no circumstances should the agency be authorized to send any details without an approval.


Agencies send candidates all the time without approval. I have seen agencies even doctor up resumes for a candidate with my resume or other people that I know really well. It is always a riot when the agency then submits said resume to you for their candidate - and it is your resume.


Well the good ones, meaning those with a good sense of ethics, won't do either of those things. The ones I have worked with have always contacted me before sending my resume to potential clients.



Lynn Pettis

For better assistance in answering your questions, click here
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SQL Musings from the Desert Fountain Valley SQL (My Mirror Blog)
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