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I'm totally new. Need some guide on SQL 2012 Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 6:57 AM
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Something wrong here, if your boss really know about DBA work, he will know that for every exam you will need hand on experience for 1-2 year.
This may be his excuse and may drive you to desperate action.
Better check with your DBA team whether they have any certification.

If your DBA team willing to bring you to the team ask them to show you or let them train you may be at lunch time.

The other way is go for Training, ask your boss if it is possible to send you for training.
By my experience reading from book has a slim chance to pass the exam (may be only me).
Exam prep like Selftest and Transender will do better but nothing can replace microsoft training at some training center.

Sometime all are not possible, I always wait for second shot which may come in August or near end of the year.
But absolutely I will have SQL server XXXX developer edition on my computer at work/home even I work as DBA.

IMHO, reading from web search for concern topic is much better than reading from book.

Nearly forget, safaribooksonline, cbtnuggets .. has video training for this topic at low cost or free for 7 days.

Good luck.

JJ
Post #1595883
Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 9:12 AM
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I agree, start with the Stairways on this site. You probably won't be able to leap straight into the Microsoft certification books (I don't mean that rudely; they do assume a certain level of experience).

There are some free e-books on this site too; http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Books/ . It might be worth starting with the Accidental DBA one.

Also why not sign up for Brent Ozar's free weekly DBA training plan as well? It's pretty good.

http://www.brentozar.com/archive/2013/07/announcing-our-free-accidental-dba-6-month-training-plan/
Post #1595931
Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 9:19 AM


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I wouldn't suggest those books for a total newbie. They expect a lot more experience. Additional, (s)he is seeking for the querying certification exam.


Luis C.
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Post #1595935
Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 9:21 AM
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Thanks guys. Really usefull information here. To start off first, my boss wants to give me the opportunity. There's a guy where I work that took the certification after a few months of reading, and he never did anything like this before.. The team wants me there because they saw a potential in me I didn't know about, so I went ahead and talked to my boss that I wanted to head for that direction.

The sudden decision he made, was purely because he needed a formal certification when he is about to announce an SQL job announcement duye in September. And he wants ME to have the opportunity to grow.. He knows very well that it requires experience.. Anyways, I've followed almost every advice I got on this thread here.. I'm reading dummies, stairways and I am going through CBTnuggets videos for 70-461.. I feel that this is my shot. My chance to start a new chapter in the vast IT-world.. Heck I'm almost 30 and grown tired of 1-line type of work
Post #1595936
Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 9:31 AM
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That's great. Good luck. Get as much real-world experience as you can, and keep us posted .
Post #1595939
Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 10:57 AM
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If you're just starting with certifications, why not start with an exam on a product you have experience with already? Since these exams assume 1-2 years of experience, you'll have a better chance of passing an exam in an area you've been working with, such as Windows 7 or Office.

Frankly, the attitude of some employers where someone must have a certification before they are allowed into a job that works with a certain technology is backward. None of the training materials, including those published by Microsoft, is guaranteed to cover all exam questions. The people who write books and training materials don't have access to the pool of questions used in the exams and even if they have taken the exams themselves, they are not permitted to reveal actual questions. Microsoft does not want people to pass exams unless they have had actual experience and the exams are designed that way. As a result, the actual exams contain questions that no one would know unless they had come across that specific situation in an actual environment.

So starting with an exam in an area you have already have work experience, you'll have a greater chance of passing, obtaining a certification to add to your resume, and you will have exposure to how exams you take in the future will work.

Here's a good place to start:

https://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/certification-overview.aspx
Post #1595962
Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 11:46 AM
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dan-572483 (7/24/2014)
If you're just starting with certifications, why not start with an exam on a product you have experience with already? Since these exams assume 1-2 years of experience, you'll have a better chance of passing an exam in an area you've been working with, such as Windows 7 or Office.

Frankly, the attitude of some employers where someone must have a certification before they are allowed into a job that works with a certain technology is backward. None of the training materials, including those published by Microsoft, is guaranteed to cover all exam questions. The people who write books and training materials don't have access to the pool of questions used in the exams and even if they have taken the exams themselves, they are not permitted to reveal actual questions. Microsoft does not want people to pass exams unless they have had actual experience and the exams are designed that way. As a result, the actual exams contain questions that no one would know unless they had come across that specific situation in an actual environment.

So starting with an exam in an area you have already have work experience, you'll have a greater chance of passing, obtaining a certification to add to your resume, and you will have exposure to how exams you take in the future will work.

Here's a good place to start:

https://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/certification-overview.aspx


While that's a good idea, I really need a DB certification because of the job advertisement that's going out in September... I'm very new to databases, but I've got a nice overview on the basic here now I think.. Tables and views that's connected to the database, and uses a query language to fetch and manipulate data.. I took a test now and scored 80% (but I dropped off early though).. While I'm not overly confident in myself regarding SQL, this at least gave me a little boost :)
Post #1595975
Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 1:58 PM
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I took a test now and scored 80% (but I dropped off early though).. While I'm not overly confident in myself regarding SQL, this at least gave me a little boost :)

IMHO
That is good testing score, now come to the dark side of the exams.
It always test about something that we normally not face everyday something like XML (auto, raw...etc), Rank, over partition, union etc..
So If you know all command structure inside out, how it works, and result outcome, you may be in good shape.

Just my 2 cents.

JJ

Post #1596011
Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 2:26 PM


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kimmedim (7/23/2014)
By the way, maybe the 70-461 certification is a long shot for a newbie as myself?


To be blunt, yes. The exam's intended candidates are DBAs/database developers with 2+ years experience. If the possibility of failing doesn't phase you, then go ahead (especially if you can persuade your boss to pay for the attempt), but don't be discouraged if you fail it.

You have a lot of studying ahead of you. If you're able to buy a book, get Itzik Ben-Gan's T-SQL Fundamentals. It's not a study guide for the exam, but it is an excellent basic T-SQL book.



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Post #1596018
Posted Monday, July 28, 2014 8:46 AM
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I am taking my certifications in SQL Server 2008 R2: Database Developer soon. I've been studying for the past week and I thought I would toss some tidbits for ya.

I had no prior database experience like you. My boss gave me a shot simple because I worked in software development for the past 8 years. I was only supposed to find and manage the work on the database, not actually do it. I ended up taking on the work instead because it came very natural to me due to all my experience in working around databases and object-oriented languages.

For me, I have company resources that provide me with a free video course on the exam and a practice test. For you, you only have books and free courses that you can find. However, the tactics are still the same.

My tactic is very traditional. I've been covering a lot of material and taking notes in question form from everything that I've been consuming.

What is a distributed partitioned view?
How do you create a partition table?
What is a federation server?


Etc.

I've been storing my notes in Evernote, which is a free online tool and application that is available for every device. Every piece of information I consume goes in that tool and it's been helping me study for all the exams on top of live training in SQL Server. The best part is that Evernote works on all my devices. I have it on my PC, cellphone and tablet. I'm pretty much always reviewing and studying everywhere I go now.

I think it's a good way to cram if it was me.
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