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I'm totally new. Need some guide on SQL 2012 Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, July 21, 2014 2:10 PM
Grasshopper

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Hi folks!

I'll put it briefly.. I want to work with DB, but I know nothing about it because I have never worked with it. I'm working on Servicedesk first-line.. I know a little bit of HTML coding, and that's about the only coding I know.. ever.. Today my boss told me that IF I can do an SQL 2012-certification within 01.09.2014, he will move me over to the Database-group (The group wants me there by the way, so that's a plus)..
I ran home and got into reading 70-461 at once..

Short question in how to go about prepping for the exam..? What would you guys recommend me to do? As far as LEARNING goes in depth, it can wait until I get transferred to the DB-group, because there's the place I'll get to learn for real.. I need some advice on how to pass the exam, and what I should focus on.. Remember that I'm totally new to this

Thanks in advance :)

-Kim R
Post #1594819
Posted Monday, July 21, 2014 2:57 PM


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So you went and read the page for the exam on Microsoft Learning https://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/exam-70-461.aspx. You can find a section called Preparation Options whoch include a variety of ways to prepare.
Additional to that, you could look for other books on SQL Server and T-SQL. You can read some of the Stairways in this site. And you really should get yourself a copy of SQL Server, either the Developer Edition (complete suite at very low price) or the Express Edition with advanced tools (completely free with limited options/features) which might suffice for this exam.

Try to understand the basic concepts of relational databases and everything will become easier.



Luis C.
Are you seriously taking the advice and code from someone from the internet without testing it? Do you at least understand it? Or can it easily kill your server?

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #1594839
Posted Monday, July 21, 2014 4:53 PM


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Go here:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/download/details.aspx?id=29062

download and install this file:

ENU\x64\SQLEXPRWT_x64_ENU.exe this one is With Tools (i.e. includes SSMS - SQL Server Management Studio). I don't think you will need the advanced tools version, but you can

(I am assuming English, get whatever language suits you best)

SQL Express is a cut down version of SQL Server but only cut down in terms of the size of database file and number of CPUs supported and some other really advanced features - you can still use it to learn most of SQL Server.

Now you have the tools to begin.

Most things can be done in two ways, either using the GUI interface - i.e. the Object Explorer window in SSMS - right click on the treeview to create database query tables etc - or using T-SQL using the Query window in SSMS. You have to learn both for the exam.

I had a quick look at the exam syllabus - and from complete newbie to being prepared for exam by September is a tall order - but I have done a Microsoft Exam (ASP.NET) from virtually nothing to pass in 6 weeks so it is doable - but be warned you will have to treat it as a full time job in itself - we had a very quiet time at work so I could use spare time at work, and all evenings and weekends to study.

Good luck.


Post #1594875
Posted Tuesday, July 22, 2014 12:14 AM
Grasshopper

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Thanks guys. This really sheds some light for me in terms how "big" this is.. That I have to treat it like a full-time job, and install the client on my computer to practice.. Are there other termiology, keywords or queries I should remember more than other? I mean, what's important and what's not, in the book? Just so that I am clear on what is really important when reading the book
Post #1594940
Posted Tuesday, July 22, 2014 12:20 PM


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Technology changes so quickly - for a career in IT you will learn stuff that will be obsolete in 5 years. You will learn stuff you will never use and you will come across stuff in your job that you can't find any documentation or books to help with. You have to be able to get through vast amounts of information quickly.

I have read so many of those 2-inch thick computer books in my time. But reading those books cover to cover is not an option. They are not novels and there just isn't time. I now have a standard method of going through them.

1) Skimming the whole book in a couple of 2-hour sessions. Reading the contents pages - ignore the introduction/acknowledgements - then in each chapter just the main headings - take in the diagrams and any code - don't stop to actually read the text of the book - just get an overview of the whole thing. Go as fast as you can, but turn every page and read headings diagrams and code. (Rest afterwards its exhausting)

Then I have an idea of the scope of the whole book.

2) Run through each chapter in a 1-hour session just to refresh - this time a little more in-depth - perhaps reading lists, tables, any highlighted or italic text, perhaps a few sentences that take your interest - but again don't slow up by actually reading the text in sequence.

3) Now go to your computer and start doing the examples and running the code from the chapter you just went through - if you get lost or don't understand the code - now is the time to go back to the text and get clarification, or Google if that doesn't help.

4) Do the questions on that chapter and if you get them wrong work out why. The Microsoft books tend to have simplistic examples, but the questions can be tricky - use Google - its quicker than searching pages in the book

Repeat 2 to 4 for all chapters.

Using this method you might actually read 25% of the words in the book - but you should have some knowledge of everything it covers, have read all the code and tried out a good deal of it - and done all the questions.

If you get stuck you can post more specific questions here.
Post #1595229
Posted Tuesday, July 22, 2014 1:59 PM
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Thank you so much! I think that can help! You see, I got stuck on page 50 or something, about converting nonrelational to relational. I got stuck there for a whole day.. Maybe I should try what you said, and just skim the book first
Post #1595272
Posted Wednesday, July 23, 2014 12:00 PM
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Hey again guys.. I gotta be completely honest. I don't udnerstand a thing now after the data-type chapter.. It's like I'm reading a bunch of codes I don't know where belongs.. It's hard to grasp when I have never worked with databases before.. The book seems to be aiming on IT professionals that already have a bunch of knowledge about this..

Would it be better for me to go for dummies-book first maybe?
Post #1595641
Posted Wednesday, July 23, 2014 12:24 PM


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kimmedim (7/23/2014)
Hey again guys.. I gotta be completely honest. I don't udnerstand a thing now after the data-type chapter.. It's like I'm reading a bunch of codes I don't know where belongs.. It's hard to grasp when I have never worked with databases before.. The book seems to be aiming on IT professionals that already have a bunch of knowledge about this..

Would it be better for me to go for dummies-book first maybe?

Which book is that? Have you tried the Stairway to TSQL? http://www.sqlservercentral.com/stairway/75773/



Luis C.
Are you seriously taking the advice and code from someone from the internet without testing it? Do you at least understand it? Or can it easily kill your server?

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #1595654
Posted Wednesday, July 23, 2014 12:29 PM
Grasshopper

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The SQL for Dummies version 8.. I'll check out the stairway to sql..
By the way, maybe the 70-461 certification is a long shot for a newbie as myself? I mean, I have a a timeframe of 5 weeks.. For my boss it did not matter which certification I took, as long as I have one by the 1 September
Post #1595659
Posted Wednesday, July 23, 2014 5:40 PM
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To be honest, if you can pass the 70-461 Exam by August 1 after knowing nothing about on July 1 then you should be your boss's boss.

Still, it is worth perusing to see if that is the direction you want to take your career. If you're like me just reading a book won't cut it. I find it easier if I can get my hands on it. Here's a low-cost way to get started:

As others have pointed out, you can download SQL Server Express With Advanced Services for free. I'd get the 2014 version but if you don't have at least Windows 7 SP1 you can get the 2012 version (which works on Vista).

Next, go to codeplex.com and download the AdventureWorks2012 sample database.

Use the documentation or Google as a source to install SQL Express, and then install the AdventureWorks2012 database.

Now see if you can figure out how to get a list of all the names in the database with a specific last name.

Next, read about JOINS and get a list of the same people and their addresses.

If you get this far, you'll be started on your way to being ready for the 70-461 Exam. Since this exam is about queries I believe most of the skills you need can be practiced with the free Express Edition.

Also study how to backup & restore databases, then practice it. This is a vital skill to have, especially when you start to practice modifying the database you'll probably mess it up and want to restore it to what you had before.

Good luck!
Post #1595765
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