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A Brief History of SQL Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, September 15, 2003 11:21 PM
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Good one. In recent days I heard about Hirarchial Databases. What about them? Have they released??

madhusudannaidugundapaneni



Madhu
Post #77307
Posted Tuesday, September 16, 2003 12:48 AM


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quote:

Good one. In recent days I heard about Hirarchial Databases. What about them? Have they released??


The hiearchical database model is somewhat older than the relational model. I think the most prominent system is IBM's IMS which (still) runs on older mainframe systems. With the evolution of object-relational or object-oriented DBMS this model has some kind of revival.
If you could wait some time, I've finished an article on this topic in german. Needs only to be translated to english. Then fine-tuned and hopefully published.

Frank
http://www.insidesql.de


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Frank Kalis
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Webmaster: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs
My blog: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs/frankkalis/
Post #77308
Posted Tuesday, September 16, 2003 4:04 AM
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quote:

quote:

What do you think of his GRID computing?


I will say, I'll answer this very carefully.
AFAIK GRID computing is like having a single, large virtual computer.
I'm really not sure what to think of this whole 'unifying thing', although the intention is honorable.


The recent articles on it left me thinking it is nothing more than load balancing on a cluster style system with replication between node networks.

The problem I see is that all my encounters with Oracle replication methods means a large possibility for many gaps in data and lags in processing. Our problem management system is on Oralce and the replication has been known to replicate everything but a handdull of records which magicly appear days later.




Post #77309
Posted Tuesday, September 16, 2003 5:37 AM


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quote:

The problem I see is that all my encounters with Oracle replication methods means a large possibility for many gaps in data and lags in processing. Our problem management system is on Oralce and the replication has been known to replicate everything but a handdull of records which magicly appear days later.


Do you think Oracle has this one weakness


Frank
http://www.insidesql.de


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Microsoft SQL Server MVP
Webmaster: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs
My blog: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs/frankkalis/
Post #77310
Posted Tuesday, September 16, 2003 5:55 AM
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quote:

Do you think Oracle has this one weakness



No it has more, thankfully thou there are a lot of third party apps and oracle addons you can pay large sums for to fix these. However looking at what they are planning for next release EM they may be finally stepping up to the plate with quality.




Post #77311
Posted Thursday, September 18, 2003 3:45 AM


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Just wanted to add a link to a resource that most authors refer to as not (fully) available online.

A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks by E. F. Codd
http://www.acm.org/classics/nov95/toc.html

I think this is the full text.

For those who are interested.

Frank
http://www.insidesql.de


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Frank Kalis
Microsoft SQL Server MVP
Webmaster: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs
My blog: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs/frankkalis/
Post #77312
Posted Wednesday, August 4, 2004 7:02 AM
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Wonderful article. I was searching for a article like this for long time.
Great work. Congrats

CM Niyas
Post #130081
Posted Friday, September 10, 2004 6:32 AM
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I felt the content was interesting. It sure would have benefitted from a good proofreading however.  One more example of shoddy publication.

Post #136335
Posted Friday, September 10, 2004 6:54 AM
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I liked the article. It was easy to understand, so I don't think any typos got in the way. Even Frank's signature was intriguing:


"Frank Wenn Englisch zu schwierig ist?"
So I took a look at the site (http://www.insidesql.de). Frank, judging by the first sentence, German doesn't seem to be very different from English:


"Hier finden Sie zahlreiche Artikel, FAQs, Links, Tips und Tricks rund um den Microsoft SQL Server."




Post #136343
Posted Saturday, September 11, 2004 12:10 PM
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nice article but something is missing:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

"Sybase SQL Server" was the name of Sybase Corporation's relational database product.

It was originally created for UNIX platforms in 1987. In 1988, SQL Server for OS/2 was codeveloped for the PC by Sybase, Microsoft, and Ashton-Tate. Ashton-Tate divested its interest and Microsoft became the lead partner after porting SQL Server to MS Windows NT.

Microsoft and Sybase sold and supported the product through version 4.21. In 1993 the codevelopment licensing agreement between Microsoft and Sybase ended and the companies parted ways.

In 1995, Sybase released SQL Server 11.0. Thereafter, it decided to better differentiate its product from Microsoft SQL Server by renaming it to Adaptive Server Enterprise in versions 11.5 and beyond.

Further History... Sybase was founded by Bob Epstein, the architect of a product called the Intelligent Database Machine (IDM) from Britton-Lee. This was a computer that only did relational database. It used IDL as its native language (similar but not identical to SQL). The architecture of that product was used as the starting point for Sybase, which began development from 1984(?). Beta testing of Sybase's first product started in 1986.




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