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Try to focus on the positive Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 7:40 AM


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lkent (6/10/2014)
I am thankful for this site and others that guide my never-ending quest for the next solution.


I think that we are all grateful for the site and the well founded reliance on each other!!!


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1579201
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 7:41 AM
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While there are some who have a negative attitude, too often we get painted with that brush unfairly. Our jobs are to point out the deficiencies of a design or request, to allow for a better decision. If all we are is a "yes man" when people ask us to build something that won't work, we have no value.

Recently I was asked to grant access to something for which we do not have sufficient licenses. Is me saying no an issue? Not at all. It is my job. Their job is to approach management and get budget approval for what they feel they need. If they cannot justify it, then management will have made the decision. All I did was provide information.

Obviously we need to exclude the example where someone comes to us and we don't feel like doing what they want, that is our issue and unacceptable. But when we are following policy, providing the information we are paid to provide, and the people simply don't like the answer, we still get labeled as grumpy, unapproachable, not a team player. As my kids would say, I call BS on that.


Dave
Post #1579204
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 7:46 AM
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Gary Varga (6/10/2014)
I am thankful that I work in a country that is relatively unbiased.

The UK isn't perfect but I work alongside (or have done) men, women and other (it's a complicated world) as well as those of various ethnicity, people with a range of religious beliefs (including none), various disablements (from ingrowing toenails to no legs) amongst them (of should I say us) as well as differing abilities. Progression is mainly due to the latter (there will always be exceptions) combined with ambition.

The world isn't an even place but I have found that natural tolerance in the UK IT workplace to be almost universal. Hurrah for us!!!


I have unfortunately seen the opposite in the US. I worked with a very, very intelligent black man named Broderick when I first started in this career. He was easily smarter and better than everyone else on the team, yet was paid less than all of us. That includes me, as a new hire, with no experience.

I have also had the pleasure of working in environments where almost everyone was a minority. So discrimination or unfairness isn't everywhere.

I would love to see the day when the only bias we have is on capabilities, not skin color, gender or religion. Unfortunately I think it is getting worse in a lot of cases.


Dave
Post #1579209
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 9:26 AM


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djackson 22568 (6/10/2014)


...He was easily smarter and better than everyone else on the team, yet was paid less than all of us....


Yikes. I hope he's moved on to better things.

I'm thankful my workplace does not practice this culture.


Hakim Ali
www.sqlzen.com
Post #1579269
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 9:48 AM


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djackson 22568 (6/10/2014)
Gary Varga (6/10/2014)
I am thankful that I work in a country that is relatively unbiased.

The UK isn't perfect but I work alongside (or have done) men, women and other (it's a complicated world) as well as those of various ethnicity, people with a range of religious beliefs (including none), various disablements (from ingrowing toenails to no legs) amongst them (of should I say us) as well as differing abilities. Progression is mainly due to the latter (there will always be exceptions) combined with ambition.

The world isn't an even place but I have found that natural tolerance in the UK IT workplace to be almost universal. Hurrah for us!!!


I have unfortunately seen the opposite in the US. I worked with a very, very intelligent black man named Broderick when I first started in this career. He was easily smarter and better than everyone else on the team, yet was paid less than all of us. That includes me, as a new hire, with no experience.

I have also had the pleasure of working in environments where almost everyone was a minority. So discrimination or unfairness isn't everywhere.

I would love to see the day when the only bias we have is on capabilities, not skin color, gender or religion. Unfortunately I think it is getting worse in a lot of cases.


Back in 2001 I had an intelligent debate with a coworker about positive discrimination. It was in the context of inner city poverty which the demographics reported at the time was largely from a ethnically black background.

He was certain what was required was to target funding for black families to allow the to become upwardly socially mobile.

I vehemently disagreed and said that we could achieve the same thing just by targeting the poorest families in the inner cities. I felt, and still do, that if we were to base it on funding the inner city families who were poorest then we probably would be funding an extremely large proportion of black people (maybe even 100%) but that the criteria is one that is more widely acceptable. I said that it was wholly unfair to base it on ethnicity and would in the long term lead to a racist backlash. I feel that we can see that now.

It would not surprise me to find here on SSC a mature cross section of people who struggle with understanding prejudice.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1579281
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 9:57 AM
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However stressful and/or repetitive my job can be (it really helps to enjoy doing restores ) I try to remain grateful that I get to come to a really nice office in one of the best cities in the world (London), I get paid a good salary with scope for earning more, and I'm not exactly working in an asbestos mine.

There is a lot I would change if I could, but compared to most people in the world I am very lucky, and I try to stay mindful of that. (It's not always easy .)
Post #1579288
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 9:57 AM
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I am not grateful for how I always seem to do double-posts on this site even though I only click once . It doesn't happen on any other sites.
Post #1579289
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 10:02 AM
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hakim.ali (6/10/2014)

djackson 22568 (6/10/2014)


...He was easily smarter and better than everyone else on the team, yet was paid less than all of us....


Yikes. I hope he's moved on to better things.

I'm thankful my workplace does not practice this culture.


ALL of us did.


Dave
Post #1579295
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 10:10 AM


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djackson 22568 (6/10/2014)
hakim.ali (6/10/2014)

djackson 22568 (6/10/2014)


...He was easily smarter and better than everyone else on the team, yet was paid less than all of us....


Yikes. I hope he's moved on to better things.

I'm thankful my workplace does not practice this culture.


ALL of us did.


The few times across an attitude like that no one was prepared to hang around. Sometimes it is difficult to call it out when it doesn't effect oneself directly so it seems easier to abandon the rotting moral carcass of a ship and say good riddance.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1579302
Posted Tuesday, June 10, 2014 10:15 AM


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Thanks for this editorial. You know, it's funny. A lot of things that I used to see as grumpy in DBAs or in other IT people is actually a lot to be thankful for upon closer inspection. I admire the way that grumpiness really implies a tremendous amount of care and pride in taking care of your stuff, as it were. The perceived negativity usually arises when one spots a potential risk or that someone doesn't appreciate the implications of a seemingly innocuous action. This can start as something one spots in oneself and tries to weed out with increasing frequency in oneself and in everyone else around.

I am thankful for the mentors at SQL Server Central and in my career that have helped me cultivate that protective attitude toward data and servers. Of course I aim to be better at this tomorrow than I am today, but I see that kind of "productive grumpiness" - for lack of a better term - as a sign that the grumpy one is looking out for me.

- webrunner


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Ref.: http://tkyte.blogspot.com/2009/02/sql-joke.html
Post #1579307
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