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How Long Before You Upgrade? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, April 10, 2014 8:49 PM


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Post #1560698
Posted Thursday, April 10, 2014 10:54 PM
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Ummm someone I know works on LOB applications.

They would run their application on the CTP, then the RTM, and then on the development server, and finally tell the business to upgrade its hosted platforms.

The business eventually forced him out. Then they forced someone else who could do it out. Now there is nobody to do it, and they will likely be stuck on 2012, a few CU behind, for the rest of eternity.

But you know they don't even use the 2012 features anyway so it's not a huge deal. Why? Because one customer insisted on running their own server, and that server is stuck on 2008. As a result, that's the version the LOB must target, and the entire business (and its tens of thousands of other customers) gets held back.

Fun. Moral of the story: If you do an LOB application, and a customer wants to host their own, make forced upgrades part of the contract.
Post #1560706
Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 1:22 AM


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Cody K (4/10/2014)
Ummm someone I know works on LOB applications.

They would run their application on the CTP, then the RTM, and then on the development server, and finally tell the business to upgrade its hosted platforms.

The business eventually forced him out. Then they forced someone else who could do it out. Now there is nobody to do it, and they will likely be stuck on 2012, a few CU behind, for the rest of eternity.

But you know they don't even use the 2012 features anyway so it's not a huge deal. Why? Because one customer insisted on running their own server, and that server is stuck on 2008. As a result, that's the version the LOB must target, and the entire business (and its tens of thousands of other customers) gets held back.

Fun. Moral of the story: If you do an LOB application, and a customer wants to host their own, make forced upgrades part of the contract.



...or support multiple versions???


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Post #1560729
Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 1:23 AM


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Our company is not a consulting or developing company, we are the customer and we often think: when something is running fine, leave it, don't mess with it.
We still have 2 instances of SQL 2000 because they have applications running on it that need this version. Since we don't want to update the application, SQL 2000 will be used till we decide to a new application.
Beside the SQL 2000 we have one instance of 2005, several 2008R2 and since a few month one 2012.
As you can see, a mix of several versions.
How long before upgrade? When the application needs it, otherwise we keep it at the same version.

have a nice weekend,
Vera
Post #1560731
Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 1:29 AM


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As I work as a freelance software development consultant, I occasionally get to influence the versions used of relevant software but not always. I like the strategy of do everything on the latest available version The definition of latest differs from company to company; for some it means the latest release from the vendor, for others the latest authorised version to use (which may be many versions old). That way you are likely to get the longest time possible for the given circumstances between commissioning systems and upgrading them.

Gaz

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Post #1560733
Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 1:36 AM


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Vera-428803 (4/11/2014)
Our company is not a consulting or developing company, we are the customer and we often think: when something is running fine, leave it, don't mess with it.
We still have 2 instances of SQL 2000 because they have applications running on it that need this version. Since we don't want to update the application, SQL 2000 will be used till we decide to a new application.
Beside the SQL 2000 we have one instance of 2005, several 2008R2 and since a few month one 2012.
As you can see, a mix of several versions.
How long before upgrade? When the application needs it, otherwise we keep it at the same version.

have a nice weekend,
Vera


Sensible approach in my opinion.


Gaz

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Post #1560738
Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 1:59 AM
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I know of a company that has a SQL2000 instance still running in SQL7 compatibility mode.

The drive to upgrade comes when it is a physical machine with a spiralling maintenance cost attached to it. A 10 year old server will be 32bit, have a large physical footprint, require more cooling and power and be ever more difficult to supply replacement parts. In the same rack space as the old physical server machines they could host 128 virtual servers, each of greater power than the single physical machine.

There are two barriers to upgrading from SQL7/2000
1. Licencing costs
2. Huge number of DTS packages


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Post #1560747
Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 2:06 AM


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I'd have to say that I have seen deprecated features, such as DTS like David.Poole mentioned, are a barrier to upgrading. This is a technology agnostic issue as I have seen the same issue holding back upgrades and migrations due to differing technologies such as .NET.

Gaz

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Post #1560749
Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 2:47 AM
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I guess the companies motives and my own differ. I want to keep my skill set current and play with all the new features, the company don't want the cost of upgrade and regression testing without good reason. From my experience unless I can find a good justification upgrades happen when vendor support starts to go. Currently we run a lot of 2008R2 and a couple of 2012 and 2005
Post #1560763
Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 4:03 AM


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graeme.shorter 69931 (4/11/2014)
I guess the companies motives and my own differ. I want to keep my skill set current and play with all the new features, the company don't want the cost of upgrade and regression testing without good reason. From my experience unless I can find a good justification upgrades happen when vendor support starts to go. Currently we run a lot of 2008R2 and a couple of 2012 and 2005


This is where I would like to see companies allow both time and resources allocated to keep their staff up to date WITHOUT forcing upgrades. I have seen places where they evaluate new releases by test/sample migrations of the database or software most likely to require it soonest.


Gaz

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