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missing .mdf and .ldf database file after hard drive crash Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, March 24, 2014 3:43 PM


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hwp (3/24/2014)
Because before the drive failed, I have seen a couple of times that the bak file is only a couple of Kbyte while it should be around 200 MB. At that time I ran the backup manually then I could get a good backup.

So, no I don't know 100% that the backup it corrupted but since the data hard drive had gone bad and for the fact that it had backup problem before I think most likely the bak file is corrupted too.

Sorry I don't know about the recovery model.

Thanks,
Howard.


Your latest full sized .bak file might be as good as you can get.
Hopefully it was saved somewhere safe.
Like Gail and Jeff mentioned, you should get some qualified local help.
Especially if this was a real important database.

Part of that should include more planning for just such a disaster.
Lucky is it never happening.
Good is being able to handle it with little business impact.


Post #1554239
Posted Tuesday, March 25, 2014 6:26 AM


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As someone else has already stated if this data is valuable I would seriously consider bringing in a seasoned SQL Server pro to handle this. No offense intended but you do not have a clue, leave it to someone who can recover your database(s) for you. Also, have your contractor savior review the current backup and recovery plan and change it as needed.
Post #1554419
Posted Tuesday, March 25, 2014 6:47 AM
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Is this production server? Do not try things on prod and make scenario worst. Do all your restore and R&D on junkbox.

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Those who understand binary, and those who don't."
Post #1554431
Posted Tuesday, March 25, 2014 6:48 AM


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Grumpy DBA (3/25/2014)
As someone else has already stated if this data is valuable I would seriously consider bringing in a seasoned SQL Server pro to handle this. No offense intended but you do not have a clue, leave it to someone who can recover your database(s) for you. Also, have your contractor savior review the current backup and recovery plan and change it as needed.


Also hardware redundancy. We monitor things like disks, and use raid / SAN to minimize disruptions like you are experiencing.
It is hindsight, but had you (or someone else) dug in deeper at your first sign of trouble, you may have been able to avoid most of this.
Most servers have some kind of health monitoring for things like this.
Post #1554432
Posted Wednesday, March 26, 2014 2:06 PM
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Thank you very much for all the recommendation and suggestion.

We are currently looking for expert help in recovering our database. If anyone has any suggestion or do provide service please PM me.

We are located in Los Angeles.

Thank you,
Howard.
Post #1555154
Posted Wednesday, March 26, 2014 2:34 PM


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hwp (3/24/2014)
Hi All,

Thank you for the reply. The hard drive that crashed was actually the DATA drive.

And the backup is corrupted as well, plus it is a .bak file. It doesn't have .mdf and .ldf file.

Sorry, a total noob here.

Thanks,
Howard.


First of all, Moden is right. STOP EVERYTHING and get to an expert. You could accidentally destroy data without knowing it. Do you need references for good experts?

As Gail said, you may need a data recovery company. www.gillware.com is the best at the most reasonable prices. Beware that the company may not be able to resolve a crashed drive to the point of finding anything you can use.

In the future, if you recover:

1. Back up your database daily to a NAS or other destination that is not the same physical media as your MDF or LDF file. If the data are critical, use full recovery model and back up the transaction logs every 5-30 minutes, to that separate location.
2. A second stage backup should be taken DAILY of that NAS to tape or the cloud or somewhere. What if the NAS fails too?
3. Test restores should be done at least monthly to another location to ensure backup integrity.

There is nothing more traumatic to a DBA than the total loss of a database. I hope and pray that you can recover!

Thanks
John.
Post #1555166
Posted Wednesday, March 26, 2014 2:38 PM


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hwp (3/26/2014)
Thank you very much for all the recommendation and suggestion.

We are currently looking for expert help in recovering our database. If anyone has any suggestion or do provide service please PM me.

We are located in Los Angeles.

Thank you,
Howard.


Hi. The best SQL people that I can recommend are Paul Randal and Kim Tripp. See www.sqlskills.com. They do DR like this.

Thanks
John.
Post #1555170
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2014 12:02 PM
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@John,

Thank you for the recommendation, we will contact them for the recovery of the database.

Thank you,
Howard.
Post #1555596
Posted Friday, March 28, 2014 12:28 AM


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Two things.
They're not hard drive recovery specialists. If you don't have an mdf and an ldf which doesn't attach or a backup which won't restore (a full-sized backup, not the 20k one you have), don't call them. Contact a drive recovery company instead.
They are not cheap and recovering a database is not quick.

To be honest, unless the data in this lost database is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, I'd be looking at restoring that old backup that you have. At least then you'll have something, not the nothing that you've had for a week now.



Gail Shaw
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Post #1555774
Posted Friday, March 28, 2014 8:34 AM


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GilaMonster (3/28/2014)
Two things.
They're not hard drive recovery specialists. If you don't have an mdf and an ldf which doesn't attach or a backup which won't restore (a full-sized backup, not the 20k one you have), don't call them. Contact a drive recovery company instead.
They are not cheap and recovering a database is not quick.

To be honest, unless the data in this lost database is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, I'd be looking at restoring that old backup that you have. At least then you'll have something, not the nothing that you've had for a week now.


I was referring him to Gillware.com for the hard drive. As for SQL best practices and DR if the backup is at least in part recoverable, I recommended SQL Skills. Sorry if my note was ambiguous.

Thanks
John.
Post #1555951
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