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DBA Dreams Expand / Collapse
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Posted Sunday, March 2, 2014 9:42 AM
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Comments posted to this topic are about the item DBA Dreams


Post #1546706
Posted Sunday, March 2, 2014 4:22 PM


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"I've encountered DBAs who seemed ill equipped to administer a home grocery list and checkbook"

This made me laugh out loud. Thankfully I haven't encountered such DBAs.


Leonard
Madison, WI
Post #1546745
Posted Monday, March 3, 2014 6:54 AM
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In a job that is, for the most part, worthy-but-dull, rather than the stuff of dreams

Most good jobs are like that. Glamor is transient, but the enjoyment of doing something well, regardless of the field, is what makes it rewarding.

There is a huge amount of work required to keep society running. The trick is to find a niche where one is comfortable.

BTW, I often suspect that can be a poor choice to choose a job that is also your hobby/passion. If you love photography, will you love it so much when most of your time is doing ad photos for Randy's car lot or filling weekend after weekend with schlocky weddings? If you love music, will it be so much fun when you've got to hit the Motel 6 lounge for your 4 nights a week gig, whether you feel up to it or not?

Even if you get to the more glamorous parts of your field, you still lose the control you had when it was a hobby. The freedom to do what you want, when you want, if you want.




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Post #1546909
Posted Monday, March 3, 2014 3:25 PM


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phonetictalk (3/2/2014)
"I've encountered DBAs who seemed ill equipped to administer a home grocery list and checkbook"

This made me laugh out loud. Thankfully I haven't encountered such DBAs.


Yeah that is funny until you come across those DBAs. I have come across more than my share of them as well.




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Post #1547112
Posted Monday, March 3, 2014 4:36 PM


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SQLRNNR (3/3/2014)
phonetictalk (3/2/2014)
"I've encountered DBAs who seemed ill equipped to administer a home grocery list and checkbook"

This made me laugh out loud. Thankfully I haven't encountered such DBAs.


Yeah that is funny until you come across those DBAs. I have come across more than my share of them as well.


Out of the 20 or so "devleopers" and the 4 "dbas" I've interviewed in the last 2 years or so, only 4 (we got two recently) of the developers knew how to get the current date and time using T-SQL. None of the DBAs knew. Also, none of the DBAs knew the difference between a Clustered Index and a Non-Clustered Index nor how to do native backups.

According to their resumes, these are people that all claim to have at least 5 years of experience (most of the DBAs were closer to 10 years of experience) and all of the DBA resumes claimed expertise in "tuning queries".

I thought I'd get over being sick about it but these people have been working in what I believe to be some fairly critical companies. I don't know how they surived for as long as they did and I'm still sick about it because there are more like them out there taking "care" of medical records, payroll, etc, etc.


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Post #1547125
Posted Tuesday, March 4, 2014 1:58 PM


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Jeff Moden (3/3/2014)
SQLRNNR (3/3/2014)
phonetictalk (3/2/2014)
"I've encountered DBAs who seemed ill equipped to administer a home grocery list and checkbook"

This made me laugh out loud. Thankfully I haven't encountered such DBAs.


Yeah that is funny until you come across those DBAs. I have come across more than my share of them as well.


Out of the 20 or so "devleopers" and the 4 "dbas" I've interviewed in the last 2 years or so, only 4 (we got two recently) of the developers knew how to get the current date and time using T-SQL. None of the DBAs knew. Also, none of the DBAs knew the difference between a Clustered Index and a Non-Clustered Index nor how to do native backups.

According to their resumes, these are people that all claim to have at least 5 years of experience (most of the DBAs were closer to 10 years of experience) and all of the DBA resumes claimed expertise in "tuning queries".

I thought I'd get over being sick about it but these people have been working in what I believe to be some fairly critical companies. I don't know how they surived for as long as they did and I'm still sick about it because there are more like them out there taking "care" of medical records, payroll, etc, etc.


That is quite frightening. Wow.


Leonard
Madison, WI
Post #1547549
Posted Wednesday, March 5, 2014 12:50 PM
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phonetictalk (3/2/2014)
"I've encountered DBAs who seemed ill equipped to administer a home grocery list and checkbook"

This made me laugh out loud. Thankfully I haven't encountered such DBAs.


That must be nice. It is clearly an exaggeration of sorts, poetic license if you will, but I agree with SQLRNNR and Jeff, there are plenty of people out there that are lucky SQL Server is such a solid platform these days.. A big crash and they would be out of a job (and hopefully not because their company no longer could exist)



Post #1547984
Posted Wednesday, March 5, 2014 1:19 PM
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jay-h (3/3/2014)
In a job that is, for the most part, worthy-but-dull, rather than the stuff of dreams

Most good jobs are like that. Glamor is transient, but the enjoyment of doing something well, regardless of the field, is what makes it rewarding.



The hardest part for me at times is taking a back seat to developers... All because our work is kind of hidden...

jay-h (3/3/2014)


BTW, I often suspect that can be a poor choice to choose a job that is also your hobby/passion. If you love photography, will you love it so much when most of your time is doing ad photos for Randy's car lot or filling weekend after weekend with schlocky weddings? If you love music, will it be so much fun when you've got to hit the Motel 6 lounge for your 4 nights a week gig, whether you feel up to it or not?



My next (or next next) blog is going to be at least somewhat about this very topic. I think it really depends on the person. I think there are a great deal of folks who are happy to sing for fun and work. You can tell those musicians that last the longest are doing it for fun. Elvis Costello often complains about the business, but just loves making music.

I know Tom LaRock has his rockstar blogger list (http://thomaslarock.com/rankings/) which I still barely make, but I personally have never wanted to be a rock star, since most of them flame out. I want to be a folk star. People who stay hungry for what they do and love it, are happy doing it during the day, and at night. But it has to come from a love of what you are doing, not just out of a sense that you "ought" to be spending tons of time, or even worse, out of "greed", where you are just pushing yourself to be great because you want to be amazing and make a boatload of money.

But if you can choose a job that overlaps with what you love to do, going to work will be just as much fun as going on vacation (other than meetings, managers, budgets and all of that... but hey, you do need to make a living)



Post #1547995
Posted Wednesday, April 30, 2014 9:41 AM


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Lous Davidson wrote:

I've encountered DBAs who seemed ill equipped to administer a home grocery list and checkbook.

What surprises me is the number of DBAs these days who have very slender SQL skills. Once upon a time, long, long ago (when DB2 ruled the Earth), most DBAs possessed SQL knowledge which put that of nearly every developer in the shade. DBAs knew not just DDL forwards and backwards, but DML as well.

I'm not sure why that's changed, but changed it has.
Post #1566467
Posted Thursday, May 1, 2014 2:21 AM
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Jeff Moden (3/3/2014)
SQLRNNR (3/3/2014)
phonetictalk (3/2/2014)
"I've encountered DBAs who seemed ill equipped to administer a home grocery list and checkbook"

This made me laugh out loud. Thankfully I haven't encountered such DBAs.


Yeah that is funny until you come across those DBAs. I have come across more than my share of them as well.


Out of the 20 or so "devleopers" and the 4 "dbas" I've interviewed in the last 2 years or so, only 4 (we got two recently) of the developers knew how to get the current date and time using T-SQL. None of the DBAs knew. Also, none of the DBAs knew the difference between a Clustered Index and a Non-Clustered Index nor how to do native backups.

....


I have interviewed people for DBA positions and have had them not knowing what a null is/ biggest query they have ever written being 25 lines/ not knowing about point in time recovery. So technically poor, but management wanting them because their people skills and we dont need brilliant DBAs because things dont go wrong..

I always prefer the person who seems genuinely interested in databases with a few holes in their knowledge than someone who has better knowledge and only wants to play with the latest whiz-bang toys
Post #1566650
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