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The Cloud Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 6:40 AM


Ten Centuries

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I am not a fan of the cloud for business stuff. How do you guarantee they are backing it up, its integrity is good, when they do a 'change' to something on their end that causes an issue for something that connects to it. If something in the 'cloud' goes down you are at 100% mercy of them to get it back up and running...

For small, low user, or non critical, non sensitive data that is fine... but Payroll, Finance, AP, AR, Customer sensitive data.... nope. The NSA has proved that data insnt secure not to mention you have no idea how secury the cloud provider is and if they are being hacked.



Post #1538626
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 7:47 AM
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Many smaller businesses will find a better price point outsourcing their back office solution to the cloud. They can reduce, if not completely eliminate all onsite IT since most users are now capable of connecting their laptop to the wireless Internet connection. Large corporations, with numerous regulations, will still find value in keeping portions of the data center for the next few years. Some who choosing to maintain a "data center" will see it shrink small enough to fit into a wire closest.
Post #1538660
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 7:56 AM


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When reading the following...
We'll never be 100% in the cloud, or out of it, in the future, but increasingly, we'll be partners with the cloud.


I really expected to see this instead.
We'll never be 100% in the cloud, or out of it, in the future, but increasingly, we'll be assimilated with the cloud.




Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
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Post #1538667
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 7:59 AM
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Sean Redmond (2/6/2014)
I'm not a fan of the Cloud.

Ever since Edward Snowden confirmed my suspicions that the NSA and other spy agencies are trawling and capturing as much data as they possibly can, I do not trust the security or privacy of the Cloud. My contents may be innocuous but I'd rather that they remain private.
And since government has close links to big business, I feel that it is only a matter of time before insurance companies and the like get their hands on information about me that they'd like to know. Maybe I'm being paranoid, but even up to last year for one to air the suspicions that Edward Snowden revealed, would have one declared paranoid and ridiculed as one who believes in all of the conspiracy theories that go around. xkcd is a case in point.

My second worry about the Cloud is the return of the rented mainframe. I'm just about old enough to remember how unloved these were and how much sysadmins couldn't wait to get their own servers. My fear is that once we've got our stuff, especially our servers, on the Cloud, then our data will be held hostage — lock-in so to speak. Once lock-in has occured, Cloud companies can charge what they like. Mainframes were never especially reasonably priced, do I expect Cloud companies to remian so?

My third worry is about the importance of connection. One's Internet connection becomes a lot more vital when one's data and servers are remote. I am too accustomed to greedy telecoms' companies, contention and often less-than-perfect line quality to have to rely on it.


Thank you for the post. You saved me the time of typing the same things! I agree with all of the points you made.
Post #1538671
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 7:59 AM


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Jeff Moden (2/5/2014)
I wonder when the terms "Internet" and "Cloud" would eventually come to mean the same thing to many people.

You're correct. I fascinated that if I can get to a computer that has an internet connection, I can get to my email no matter where I am in the world. Same goes for looking things up. If that's what you define the "Cloud" as, then I'm a "Cloud Lover".

But that's not what the term "Cloud" has come to mean to me. Somehow, when the term first came out, it meant a place to store databases to me. If that's what you define as the "Cloud", then I'm still a "Cloud" distruster and would never willingly put my company's data there.

Will I someday?

Heh... "It Depends".


I have come to the view that it's not really too far different than what many companies currently do. How many businesses have their servers hosted by some hosting service or CoLo. Sure there are some differences, but at the base level it is your server / system at somebody else's facility.

Is the Cloud right for everything? No way. Is it ok for some stuff? Sure.




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Post #1538672
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 8:23 AM
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The cloud creates some disjointed management problems. If we push "some" of our infrastructure to the cloud, I still have to instantiate the tool set in two places. I have another "troubleshooting" path that has to be identified and vetted; and the end-user education piece can be difficult to communicate. The "hybrid" model is gaining, but I'm not sure we'll be able to truly let go of all of it!


Post #1538687
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 8:26 AM


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For a small or medium sized retailer wanting a database backend for their e-commerce website, cloud based database hosting is perfect. They'd be fools to invest $$$,$$$ to stand up their own server and another $$$,$$$ to hire an in-house DBA / SYSADMIN. I completely understand why a start-up would embrace a 3rd party cloud hosted database platform.

The SOAP based SOA platform is appealing to applicat ion developers, but it actually isn't as efficient as straight TCP/IP protocal and tabular data streaming.
http://blogs.technet.com/b/dataplatforminsider/archive/2009/03/10/what-s-next-for-sql-data-services.aspx
Also paying per GB for bandwidth doesn't seem benefitial for an organization wanting to host a multi-TB sized data warehouse. Of course those details vary by provider and providers can offer several different protocol and pricing structures.

For large organizations that traditionally have had a substantial IT department, it seems to me that deploying databases to a cloud based service provider would yield a good ROI in the short term, but might ROI may decline in the long term. It could turn into something like the old in-house programmers vs. outsourced programmers dilemma, where going forward the pedulum will swing the other way whenever the organization gets a new CEO.
Post #1538689
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 8:55 AM
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Round and round we go.

Outsource your peripheral functions (like payroll) but keep your assets close. The cloud is a natural extension of this.

For development work spinning up a temporary environment in AWS and destroying it when its not needed is of major benefit. Couple that with Dev/Ops where your personal dev environment only needs to exist when you are activity working on it.

Provision of services has major benefits for data. Subscribe to an address lookup, vehicle lookup, credit score service and you'll get data in a consistent form and at a cost that is proportional to your usage.

So the NSA watches communications (and probably GCHQ in Britain). What horrendous sin-bin task that must be. Imagine having to read every email dictated by Dilbert's boss? You should see some of the unintelligible gibberish that comes into my inbox. I defy anyone to extract accurate meaning from it let alone code to apply machine learning!

Machine intelligence? Have you seen the spam from recruitment agencies?

Anyway, I'm off to watch "Her" starring Joaqim Phoenix


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Post #1538715
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:31 AM


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One outgrowth of using cloud-based data will be the need to access and integrate it within a distributed computing environment. APIs, Web services and integration buses will become the order of the day.

I started working on IBM mainframes in the 1970s, and I can remember the days when data exchange between computers meant spinning reel-to-reel tapes. What a remarkable time in which we now live and work!

Post #1538731
Posted Thursday, February 6, 2014 10:42 AM
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I simply execute
REPLACE(@text,"the cloud","timeshared mainframes")

when I hear people talking about the benefits of timeshared mainframes.

Quite seriously, does anyone still know of any really good references from the 60's and 70's about how to best use timeshared mainframes at a business/overall IT strategy level? I suspect much of those selection methodologies are just as good today as it was then, once costs have been updated.

Most of the rest of the items are identical, but more difficult, on timeshared mainframes than your own machines. Security? Test it. Backups? Restore them and use the restore! High Availability - cause an outage and test it. Etc. Etc.
Post #1538760
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