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Competition or Cooperation Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, December 3, 2013 8:41 PM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Competition or Cooperation






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Post #1519463
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 1:10 AM


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I really despise the annual review system. If a manager is worth their salt, then any employee who isn't pulling their weight / performing poorly will be spotted well before the review. If not, then the manager is performing at a level 2 as well.

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Post #1519512
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 3:15 AM
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We need talented coders to solve tough problems, and we need average programmers to tackle mundane tasks


And if the manager is worth anything, the average programmers will be picking up tips from the talented ones in order to improve their skills (because thge manager will have spotted the average ones and set aside some time for them to be trained/improve their skills/learn new skills).
At which point, they pass on the tips and you begin all over again.
Post #1519541
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 3:55 AM


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This does remind me of the assertion by the UK's current Minister of Education that all schools should attain the "good" status which is only achieved when their pupil performance exceeds the national average.

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Post #1519552
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 6:07 AM


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Friends of mine worked for a company that does this and the lowest rated employees are gone in year 2 if they don't improve. I don't know how you improve it your manager has to rate all employees in a 1,2,3 type manner. They used the reasoning of we want only the best employees to work at the company. However, what it DID do was cause a lot of turnover as many good employees would leave.




Post #1519585
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 7:05 AM
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Its a great strategy for finding competitive leaders. Has anyone seen any cross sectional research on the metrics for companies that employ this strategy?
Post #1519618
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 7:26 AM
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Stuart Davies (12/4/2013)
I really despise the annual review system. If a manager is worth their salt, then any employee who isn't pulling their weight / performing poorly will be spotted well before the review. If not, then the manager is performing at a level 2 as well.

While I don't completely agree with you, your point about the manager failing is very true.


Dave
Post #1519628
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 7:32 AM
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I was a supervisor for a company that utilized this system... I had to rank people into the infamous Bell Curve. I hated this system with a passion. It divides teams and forces you into an adversarial relationship with people on your team. As another commenter noted, if you are worth your salt as a supervisor/manager you've identified those poor performers long before the annual review and are actively working to get them to an acceptable level of performance or getting ready to show them the door. Being forced to pick one person as a 1 or 2 even though they are performing at a 3 or better is the best way to demoralize the workforce and sow the seeds of discontent that will destroy the fabric of any organization.
Post #1519631
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 7:48 AM
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We need talented coders to solve tough problems, and we need average programmers to tackle mundane tasks. Both are necessary


Absolutely. What we don't want or need is deficient employees. We do need people who are willing to just do a job, and do it well, but who have no need to star at something.

The rating system you mentioned is assinine because it defines someone as deficient even if they are a star. This is just another example of the just plain stupidity that "management gurus" push.

Seriously, what if we had a team of Stroustrup, Ritchie, Kernighan, Jobs, Scott Adams, Torvalds and Donald Knuth? Can anyone seriously consider rating any one of them as a failure?

The concept of this rating system relies 100% on the assinine theory that every team is stratified, with some people being better than others, and some being worse than others. While this may be statistically true across a large sample, it is not true in every team. Further, the theory demands that those who may not be quite as good as the best people, are rated as substandard!

This drives me absolutely batty!

I once worked for a guy that drew a grid on a whiteboard, and started placing his employees in each quadrant. He went on to explain how the people in one quadrant were failures and needed to go, the people in the opposite quadrant were stars and needed to stay, and everyone else was deficient in some way or other, and needed to become stars or get fired! Sure, great idea.


Dave
Post #1519640
Posted Wednesday, December 4, 2013 8:26 AM
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"We need talented coders to solve tough problems, and we need average programmers to tackle mundane tasks. Both are necessary (along with many other roles) to ensure success of a project."

Our collegiate programming championship proves this each year. Windward Code Wars gives teams eight hours to come up with an AI that must outwit other AIs to win the game. It takes collaboration, which does not occur without communication. Thus it tests programmers for a skill set that is not commonly associated with a degree in programming.
Post #1519659
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