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Posted Monday, October 28, 2013 10:22 PM


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Really need some advice and guidance. I have been working a ETL/SSIS solution that was 75% complete when I took over. This is a solution that encompasses 39 sprocs and 24 tables. It is a complex SSIS solution with 3 packages (main, load, and export). The developer that created the solution to when I took over stated it was Code Complete but in actuality is wasn't. Tech Spec documentation doesn't even closely resemble the actually solution as he designed it, the migration plan i need to create, and the company best practices weren't met by his design. I have 95% of what is needed programmed. I am new to the company and the business processes so over the last month I have been digesting this solution. I am dealing with a "tech expert" in the group that would rather make things vague and ambiguous for me in her expectation of her code review and the changes that need to be made. To be total honesty I think she spent an hour reviewing the project and just digested out her immediate assumption. I am in a position now were I have to justify everything, account for everything, because the person overseeing it can and will throw anything out off-the-cuff just to put me on the spot. She has contradicted herself almost on everything I have had conversation with her on since this started - and she twists things so that unless I can hit her in the face with fact it has no affect. The way I figure the only way I will get a fair shake with her is if I present it in document form that leaves no doubt of ambiguity. I am more used to creating these solution on my own and making it happen. I don't know how to deal with someone challenging me on everything and expecting me to corner them with the knowledge. The technology isn't a challenge to me, nor the complexity of the solution, it is the being able to present my understanding in a way that leaves no doubt in what I know and do understand, what I have covered. it is covering my *** that is going to make this a break or success for me. Anybody have some links or suggestion of methodology for what I am needing? Thanks!
Post #1509178
Posted Thursday, October 31, 2013 1:56 PM
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Facts will always be on your side.

Were I you, I would make darned sure of what the processes currently do, and how they are done, in order that you can confidently state How It Works Now, and hopefully be able to get to "How It Should Work."

Try to ignore the drama and dedicate yourself to the business at hand. Take a deep breath and dive in, documenting the crap out of it.

You cannot control anyone, you can only control how you react to them, so stay on the side of professional business and you should be fine.

If that all fails, just remember that you were looking for a job when you found that one. You have marketable skills and it is your choice as to where to utilize them. Hopefully it won't come to that, but there are difficult people in the world. Some are worth working with, others are not.

Post #1510413
Posted Thursday, October 31, 2013 5:43 PM


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herladygeekedness (10/31/2013)
Facts will always be on your side.

Were I you, I would make darned sure of what the processes currently do, and how they are done, in order that you can confidently state How It Works Now, and hopefully be able to get to "How It Should Work."

Try to ignore the drama and dedicate yourself to the business at hand. Take a deep breath and dive in, documenting the crap out of it.

You cannot control anyone, you can only control how you react to them, so stay on the side of professional business and you should be fine.

If that all fails, just remember that you were looking for a job when you found that one. You have marketable skills and it is your choice as to where to utilize them. Hopefully it won't come to that, but there are difficult people in the world. Some are worth working with, others are not.



I read the OP's post and was getting ready to reply when I saw your's. I couldn't have said it any better.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

"Change is inevitable. Change for the better is not." -- 04 August 2013
(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1510465
Posted Tuesday, November 05, 2013 9:34 AM


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herladygeekedness,

Thanks so much for you great answer!

Best Regards..
Post #1511540
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