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Posted Friday, October 11, 2013 2:46 PM
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Using a script, I got a number for PLE. How do I conclude that this PLE is optimum for my instance?
Post #1504145
Posted Friday, October 11, 2013 3:34 PM
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Please check out the bottom of Jonathan Kehayias's blog page below:

http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/jonathan/finding-what-queries-in-the-plan-cache-use-a-specific-index/

To know whether your value is good or bad, you have to know what "normal" is. That means that you need to have a baseline value (or steady state as Jonathan refers to it) for PLE and then monitor for situations where it dips below that baseline value.
Post #1504153
Posted Friday, October 11, 2013 3:56 PM


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George M Parker (10/11/2013)
To know whether your value is good or bad, you have to know what "normal" is. That means that you need to have a baseline value (or steady state as Jonathan refers to it) for PLE and then monitor for situations where it dips below that baseline value.


This.

There are very few counters where there's a hard number that's good or bad. Numbers are normal or not normal for your instance.



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Post #1504161
Posted Sunday, October 13, 2013 6:10 AM


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And remember, in addition to what everyone else has already correctly said about it, page life expectancy can change due to things that are not issues. It's pretty normal, for example, to see the page life expectancy fall to zero during weekly or nightly data loads and then rebuild during the day. So you have to watch this metric over time.

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Post #1504256
Posted Sunday, October 13, 2013 7:07 AM


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George M Parker (10/11/2013)
Please check out the bottom of Jonathan Kehayias's blog page below:

http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/jonathan/finding-what-queries-in-the-plan-cache-use-a-specific-index/

To know whether your value is good or bad, you have to know what "normal" is. That means that you need to have a baseline value (or steady state as Jonathan refers to it) for PLE and then monitor for situations where it dips below that baseline value.


Let's make it easier for others to get to this blog:

http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/jonathan/finding-what-queries-in-the-plan-cache-use-a-specific-index/



Lynn Pettis

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Post #1504259
Posted Sunday, October 13, 2013 7:45 AM
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Thanks Lynn!
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Posted Monday, October 14, 2013 7:43 AM


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GilaMonster (10/11/2013)
George M Parker (10/11/2013)
To know whether your value is good or bad, you have to know what "normal" is. That means that you need to have a baseline value (or steady state as Jonathan refers to it) for PLE and then monitor for situations where it dips below that baseline value.


This.

There are very few counters where there's a hard number that's good or bad. Numbers are normal or not normal for your instance.


I second "that" I personally enjoy using Red Gate SQL Monitor and then using their baseline comparisons. The key is definitely watching when PLE falls and knowing what processes occur during this time.


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