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Understanding simple XML configuration code in dtsConfig file Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, October 03, 2013 3:11 PM
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<Configuration ConfiguredType="Property"
Path="\Package.Connections[AdventureWorks].Properties[ServerName]"
ValueType="String">
<ConfiguredValue>SomeServer</ConfiguredValue>
</Configuration>

I referred to the link - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc671628.aspx
A configuration is supposed to be a name-value pair. The property is ServerName, and
its new value is SomeServer.


I am not able to understand how this works. I have the following questions -
What is ConfiguredType and why do we need to mention it ?
What does Path tell us ?
What is ConfiguredValue ?
How does SSIS read such files and "get everything ready for you to use" ?

thanks.
Post #1501356
Posted Thursday, October 03, 2013 3:22 PM


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* ConfiguredType=Property. This tells the configuration configures a property of some object.

* Path is some sort of location of the object you which to configure.
For example: "\Package.Connections[AdventureWorks].Properties[ServerName]"
You take the package, go to the connection called AdventureWorks and you take the property called ServerName. With this path, you'll configure the ServerName property of the package configuration manager called AdventureWorks.

* ConfiguredValue is the value with which you want to configure some object. For example, if you deploy your package to the test server, you'll enter the name of the test server here. If you deploy the package to production, you'll enter the production server name there.

You don't need to worry too much about the structure of the XML file. It is automatically generated for you when you complete the package configuration wizard.
In my personal opinion, SQL Server configuration tables are easier to use than XML files.




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Post #1501362
Posted Thursday, October 03, 2013 3:52 PM
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Koen Verbeeck (10/3/2013)
You don't need to worry too much about the structure of the XML file. It is automatically generated for you when you complete the package configuration wizard.
In my personal opinion, SQL Server configuration tables are easier to use than XML files.


Koen - I take it as an academic exercise. It might be good to know these things.

Koen Verbeeck (10/3/2013)
* Path is some sort of location of the object you which to configure.
For example: "\Package.Connections[AdventureWorks].Properties[ServerName]"
You take the package, go to the connection called AdventureWorks and you take the property called ServerName. With this path, you'll configure the ServerName property of the package configuration manager called AdventureWorks.


This made it seem that SSIS will go to "my Package" (how does it find the package to go to is another question), that is the Package.dtsx file.
Then, it will look for something like "Connection" and "ServerName" do the config. I did not find those 2 words anywhere in my .dtsx file.

Koen Verbeeck (10/3/2013)
* ConfiguredValue is the value with which you want to configure some object. For example, if you deploy your package to the test server, you'll enter the name of the test server here. If you deploy the package to production, you'll enter the production server name there.

Post #1501367
Posted Thursday, October 03, 2013 8:26 PM


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There's a couple of reasons why you may not see (find) that property, the first one that comes to mnd is if your file is partiallly encrypted (typically done to protect info like connection details incl. User names and passwords).

If you are really (REALLY) interested in knowing more about the dtsx, the full xsd is documented here -> here



Steve.
Post #1501397
Posted Friday, October 04, 2013 3:44 AM


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etl.laptop (10/3/2013)
[quote]Koen Verbeeck (10/3/2013)
This made it seem that SSIS will go to "my Package" (how does it find the package to go to is another question), that is the Package.dtsx file.
Then, it will look for something like "Connection" and "ServerName" do the config. I did not find those 2 words anywhere in my .dtsx file.


When you execute a package, you specify the xml config file, or you specify the xml config file in the package configurations window. Either way, SSIS knows in which package to set properties, because you tied that XML config file to a specific package.

Connection is called ConnectionManager in the .dtsx and the .dtsx doesn't store the properties seperately (such as ServerName), but it stores only the connection string. When you open the designer, BIDS parses the xml behind the package and populates the properties accordingly.




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