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Posted Friday, August 30, 2013 11:08 AM
SSCrazy

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mike brockington (8/30/2013)
Vera-428803 (8/28/2013)

I sometimes speak at schools ...
Most girls are scared because of the technical aspect of the job


Read that again and tell me that it doesn't sound sexist.



Mike,

I use to speak in colleges as well and I have to say in that day and age everyone was scared. The women were more expressive and you could read some of the fear on the faces. But the men were just as afraid, however they tried to hide it with their bravado. I have heard from both male and female that there was no interest in doing IT work as a career because it just looked like too much hard work and there had to be an easier way.

Funny story about one guys first day on the job doing IT and other work at a large library. Start of day he was told what he was to do and what the hours were plus expectations etc. He asked if there was a lunch and breaks and was told yes, and that the lunch hour was his to do with as he pleased. That day for his first lunch he left to eat and never came back. The expectations must have scared the daylights out of him. It is my belief that this type of thing happens to people of all genders, races, and religions.



Have a good one!

M.


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Post #1490238
Posted Friday, August 30, 2013 11:18 AM


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The pre-job jitters can happen to anyone, regardless of gender. Particularly, if you think you are walking into a firestorm and being left on your own right away. This has got nothing to do with sexism. I have seen a bunch of people (male and female) over the years walk right out of DBA interviews because they decided the nature of the job, or the after hours/on-call hours requirement was just not for them, or not conducive to raising a family. Sexism had nothing to do with it.

"Technology is a weird thing. It brings you great gifts with one hand, and it stabs you in the back with the other. ..."
Post #1490245
Posted Friday, August 30, 2013 11:55 AM
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Travis, well said! I guess I was a little too abstract.



Not all gray hairs are Dinosaurs!
Post #1490249
Posted Friday, August 30, 2013 2:19 PM


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A user group leader responded to an inquiry with: "We don't want female speakers. Our users only want to hear technical content."

I didn't press for more details when I heard about it and I'm not interested in learning specifics.


Personally, I think that learning the details is important. How could a problem like this be corrected, unless we call attention to it, ask the speaker to explain himself, try to understand the thinking behind it?

However, this asserted bias against women in technology, if anything, appears to be specific individuals who are the culprits. It's not the same thing as, for example, bias against blacks during the 1960s. I simply don't see any broad institutional bias. If I'm wrong about this, then open my eyes by providing more specific examples.
Post #1490305
Posted Friday, August 30, 2013 2:24 PM
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Eric M Russell (8/30/2013)
[quote]If I'm wrong about this, then open my eyes by providing more specific examples.


...broad institutional bias


'Nuff said.


EDITED TO ADD: Grease paint.
Post #1490310
Posted Friday, August 30, 2013 7:06 PM


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mike brockington (8/30/2013)
Vera-428803 (8/28/2013)

I sometimes speak at schools ...
Most girls are scared because of the technical aspect of the job


Read that again and tell me that it doesn't sound sexist.


The problem is that girls are just as susceptible to peer pressure to not appear to be a geek or a nerd, if not more so than a guy.




----------------
Jim P.

A little bit of this and a little byte of that can cause bloatware.
Post #1490340
Posted Friday, August 30, 2013 9:44 PM
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Lol, Looks like the person who gave these comments doesnot follow the forums. How can somebody avoid the contribution of Gale, Kalen, Kim, a long list. Aaah he is a novice guys to comment something like this.
Post #1490343
Posted Saturday, August 31, 2013 2:17 PM


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Okay, I have read all the posts and would like to comment.

First, Women in Technology. I want to be involved with this group. As the father of three daughters, all of which want to be or are in technology fields I want to encourage others as well. Women can bring a different perspective the table simply because they do think differently than men. They see things from a different perspective and we need that additional insight.

The problem as I see it, especially at the high school level, is the girls don't want to be perceived as nerds or geeks. Trust me, I was (am) a geek. I love working with computers.

My oldest daughter is finishing up a BA degree in Intelligence Studies (she was a 35 November in the Army, which I believe is a Signal Intelligence Analyst but I may have that wrong). See is looking at getting a second BS degree to use up her GI Bill and looking at a degree in IT. She has even asked for my advice on this.

My middle daughter is a sophomore at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University working on a BS degree in Aeronautical Engineering with a minor in Business.

My youngest, a sophomore in high school also wants to pursue a career in engineering, just not sure what yet.

There is my reasoning for supporting Women in Technology, to try and get others interested in STEM, to help encourage women to strive for areas that they may not otherwise consider. Not everyone is cut out for working in technology, male or female. The problem is we seem to discourage women from technology fields and that needs to change.


As for not naming names, I have to agree with Steve on this. Since he wasn't there he isn't in a place to do so. This article, however, points out that there are still people out there that just don't get it. Women are quite capable of knowing and understanding technology and presenting it to others.



Lynn Pettis

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Post #1490425
Posted Saturday, August 31, 2013 11:24 PM


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Lynn Pettis (8/31/2013)
Okay, I have read all the posts and would like to comment.
....
The problem as I see it, especially at the high school level, is the girls don't want to be perceived as nerds or geeks. Trust me, I was (am) a geek. I love working with computers.

My oldest daughter is finishing up a BA degree in Intelligence Studies (she was a 35 November in the Army, which I believe is a Signal Intelligence Analyst but I may have that wrong). See is looking at getting a second BS degree to use up her GI Bill and looking at a degree in IT. She has even asked for my advice on this.


Tell her thanks for serving.

There is my reasoning for supporting Women in Technology, to try and get others interested in STEM, to help encourage women to strive for areas that they may not otherwise consider. Not everyone is cut out for working in technology, male or female. The problem is we seem to discourage women from technology fields and that needs to change.


Me ex-GF was a programmer at my last company. She knows her stuff and is now a teaching computers at a local high school.

Meanwhile we had a programmer at my last company that earned her comp-sci degree. She was worthless. We also had a guy programmer at my last job that was worthless as well. Both are now in other lines of work.

I don't care what you have in your pants. I care what is between your ears.




----------------
Jim P.

A little bit of this and a little byte of that can cause bloatware.
Post #1490437
Posted Sunday, September 1, 2013 4:35 AM


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Jim P. (8/31/2013)
Lynn Pettis (8/31/2013)
Okay, I have read all the posts and would like to comment.
....
The problem as I see it, especially at the high school level, is the girls don't want to be perceived as nerds or geeks. Trust me, I was (am) a geek. I love working with computers.

My oldest daughter is finishing up a BA degree in Intelligence Studies (she was a 35 November in the Army, which I believe is a Signal Intelligence Analyst but I may have that wrong). See is looking at getting a second BS degree to use up her GI Bill and looking at a degree in IT. She has even asked for my advice on this.


Tell her thanks for serving.

There is my reasoning for supporting Women in Technology, to try and get others interested in STEM, to help encourage women to strive for areas that they may not otherwise consider. Not everyone is cut out for working in technology, male or female. The problem is we seem to discourage women from technology fields and that needs to change.


Me ex-GF was a programmer at my last company. She knows her stuff and is now a teaching computers at a local high school.

Meanwhile we had a programmer at my last company that earned her comp-sci degree. She was worthless. We also had a guy programmer at my last job that was worthless as well. Both are now in other lines of work.

I don't care what you have in your pants. I care what is between your ears.


Which goes back to something else I said. Not everyone is cut out to be in this field, male or female. If you are to succeed in any field of endeavor, you have to have the aptitude and desire to work in it.



Lynn Pettis

For better assistance in answering your questions, click here
For tips to get better help with Performance Problems, click here
For Running Totals and its variations, click here or when working with partitioned tables
For more about Tally Tables, click here
For more about Cross Tabs and Pivots, click here and here
Managing Transaction Logs

SQL Musings from the Desert Fountain Valley SQL (My Mirror Blog)
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