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Help with Max function Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, August 22, 2013 9:32 AM
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I want to get the 10.1 and 10.2 in my output. How do i get that?

Table A has the columns change_id

Change_id
-----------
1.1
1.2
2.1
2.2
3.1
3.2
10.1
10.2
Post #1487354
Posted Thursday, August 22, 2013 9:52 AM


SSCrazy

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The MAX statement will only return one single value. You can get the desired results using the TOP clause:
SELECT TOP 2
change_id
FROM table_a
ORDER BY change_id DESC



** Don't mistake the ‘stupidity of the crowd’ for the ‘wisdom of the group’! **
Post #1487371
Posted Thursday, August 22, 2013 1:30 PM
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Hi

You could also try (assuming this is a numeric/float column)
with sampledata as (
select v
from (VALUES (1.1), (1.2), (2.1), (2.2), (10.1), (10.2), (10.3)) v (v)
)
select v
from sampledata
where cast(v as int) = (SELECT MAX(cast(v as int)) FROM sampledata);

Post #1487487
Posted Thursday, August 22, 2013 5:59 PM


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Sql Student-446896 (8/22/2013)
I want to get the 10.1 and 10.2 in my output. How do i get that?

Table A has the columns change_id

Change_id
-----------
1.1
1.2
2.1
2.2
3.1
3.2
10.1
10.2


There's about a thousand ways in SQL to get those 2 rows out of the sample data. But you haven't given enough information about the business rule to help us help you:

1. I want all the values in the result set whose change_id is > 10.
2. I want the 2 largest change_id values.
3. I want only change_id values where the number of digits to the left of the decimal point are 2.
4. I want the 2 highest ranked changes, which may contain more than 2 rows in the case of a tie.
5. I want the rows where the change_id sums to 20.3.

These are just a few examples of how the clarity of the business rule could affect the final query you're going to deliver.



My mantra: No loops! No CURSORs! No RBAR! Hoo-uh!

My thought question: Have you ever been told that your query runs too fast?

My advice:
INDEXing a poor-performing query is like putting sugar on cat food. Yeah, it probably tastes better but are you sure you want to eat it?
The path of least resistance can be a slippery slope. Take care that fixing your fixes of fixes doesn't snowball and end up costing you more than fixing the root cause would have in the first place.


Need to UNPIVOT? Why not CROSS APPLY VALUES instead?
Since random numbers are too important to be left to chance, let's generate some!
Learn to understand recursive CTEs by example.
Splitting strings based on patterns can be fast!
Post #1487595
Posted Thursday, August 22, 2013 9:16 PM


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dwain.c (8/22/2013)
Sql Student-446896 (8/22/2013)
I want to get the 10.1 and 10.2 in my output. How do i get that?

Table A has the columns change_id

Change_id
-----------
1.1
1.2
2.1
2.2
3.1
3.2
10.1
10.2


There's about a thousand ways in SQL to get those 2 rows out of the sample data. But you haven't given enough information about the business rule to help us help you:

1. I want all the values in the result set whose change_id is > 10.
2. I want the 2 largest change_id values.
3. I want only change_id values where the number of digits to the left of the decimal point are 2.
4. I want the 2 highest ranked changes, which may contain more than 2 rows in the case of a tie.
5. I want the rows where the change_id sums to 20.3.

These are just a few examples of how the clarity of the business rule could affect the final query you're going to deliver.


BWAAA-HAAAA!!! Good guesses, Dwain, but it's painfully obvious that the OP wanted the two numbers whose sum is the cube root of 8365.427 which has only decending number pairs from left to right with the last digit forming a single-digit "pair", has no duplicate digits, and has all possible digits greater than 0 except for 1 and 9.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

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Post #1487621
Posted Thursday, August 22, 2013 9:39 PM


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Jeff Moden (8/22/2013)
dwain.c (8/22/2013)
Sql Student-446896 (8/22/2013)
I want to get the 10.1 and 10.2 in my output. How do i get that?

Table A has the columns change_id

Change_id
-----------
1.1
1.2
2.1
2.2
3.1
3.2
10.1
10.2


There's about a thousand ways in SQL to get those 2 rows out of the sample data. But you haven't given enough information about the business rule to help us help you:

1. I want all the values in the result set whose change_id is > 10.
2. I want the 2 largest change_id values.
3. I want only change_id values where the number of digits to the left of the decimal point are 2.
4. I want the 2 highest ranked changes, which may contain more than 2 rows in the case of a tie.
5. I want the rows where the change_id sums to 20.3.

These are just a few examples of how the clarity of the business rule could affect the final query you're going to deliver.


BWAAA-HAAAA!!! Good guesses, Dwain, but it's painfully obvious that the OP wanted the two numbers whose sum is the cube root of 8365.427 which has only decending number pairs from left to right with the last digit forming a single-digit "pair", has no duplicate digits, and has all possible digits greater than 0 except for 1 and 9.


I think I'm glad you're not one of my business users if you can come up with a diabolical requirement like that one.



My mantra: No loops! No CURSORs! No RBAR! Hoo-uh!

My thought question: Have you ever been told that your query runs too fast?

My advice:
INDEXing a poor-performing query is like putting sugar on cat food. Yeah, it probably tastes better but are you sure you want to eat it?
The path of least resistance can be a slippery slope. Take care that fixing your fixes of fixes doesn't snowball and end up costing you more than fixing the root cause would have in the first place.


Need to UNPIVOT? Why not CROSS APPLY VALUES instead?
Since random numbers are too important to be left to chance, let's generate some!
Learn to understand recursive CTEs by example.
Splitting strings based on patterns can be fast!
Post #1487626
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