Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 123»»»

Flying high on the Big Data hot-air Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Monday, July 29, 2013 9:51 PM


Mr or Mrs. 500

Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:46 AM
Points: 575, Visits: 2,500
Comments posted to this topic are about the item Flying high on the Big Data hot-air


Best wishes,

Phil Factor
Simple Talk
Post #1478809
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 1:03 AM
Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 11:00 AM
Points: 63, Visits: 208
I agree that we need to manage industries enthusiasm. However, the article is vague, inconclusive and non-informative.
Post #1478845
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 1:54 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, July 4, 2014 4:46 AM
Points: 2, Visits: 96
For me personally, the part about integration of SQL Server and the R language was an eye opener.
Thanks a lot for that!

Wim
Post #1478866
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 4:20 AM


Mr or Mrs. 500

Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:46 AM
Points: 575, Visits: 2,500
@sanjarani
Sorry about that. Actually it was an editorial. I'm due to write a series of articles on the subject of Data Science to give details of statistical techniques for data professionals.



Best wishes,

Phil Factor
Simple Talk
Post #1478902
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 4:25 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, July 4, 2014 4:46 AM
Points: 2, Visits: 96
@Phil Factor

Where will these articles about data science be published?
I am quite interested
Post #1478904
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 4:27 AM


Mr or Mrs. 500

Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:46 AM
Points: 575, Visits: 2,500
@wim.bekkens

Thanks for that.
For a simple example, take a look at this series that is now coming out on Simple-talk. It walks you through an example application that involves using R to report KPIs in a SQL Server database.
Creating a Business Intelligence Dashboard with R and ASP.NET MVC: Part 1
Creating a Business Intelligence Dashboard with R and ASP.NET MVC: Part 2



Best wishes,

Phil Factor
Simple Talk
Post #1478905
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 4:29 AM


Mr or Mrs. 500

Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:46 AM
Points: 575, Visits: 2,500
@wim.bekkens
SQLServerCentral, as a Stairway to Data Science. I'm working on it.



Best wishes,

Phil Factor
Simple Talk
Post #1478909
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 5:45 AM


SSC Journeyman

SSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC Journeyman

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 3:11 PM
Points: 98, Visits: 725
Phil - I thought it was a great article. 100% with you.

There is still a massive need for good concise summary of existing systems. I am continually disappointed by many members of the standard professions. They seem unable to see the advantages that could accrue to them if they could just tighten up their processes and the summary statistics they should be monitoring constantly.
Post #1478937
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 6:04 AM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:47 PM
Points: 126, Visits: 237
Be it article or editorial, it's still a good summarization of the "third wave" so to speak of the database world. Right now the role of the data scientist is pretty specialized, but businesses are looking for ways to obtain that function without necessarily hiring someone with the academic credentials. They're looking for tools that enable employees who may not have all the formal training of a data scientist to perform data analysis. Imagine something akin to BIDS that can create flows for data analysis.

This is both a good and bad thing. It opens up more career opportunities for people who have a knack for analyzing data who may have little to no interest in being a full-fledged DBA. On the other hand, there are fundamentals of statistics and the associated inferential process (to say nothing of good data management) that simply must be understood to analyze data correctly. It isn't terribly difficult to calculate a standard deviation, a confidence interval or a p-value (in fact R makes them pathetically easy), but you really can't evaluate your results without a firm understanding of what those values are telling you about your data.

In addition to Phil's excellent comments, I would also suggest that even database professionals who aren't necessairly involved in the analysis end of things should at minimum be conversant with these fundamentals not only just to understand what the heck the data whiz-kid is talking about, but also to be able to better design and administer the back-end data systems needed for analysis.

I, too, look forward to the additional material on this subject.


____________
Just my $0.02 from over here in the cheap seats of the peanut gallery - please adjust for inflation and/or your local currency.
Post #1478942
Posted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 6:36 AM


SSC Journeyman

SSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC JourneymanSSC Journeyman

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, March 27, 2014 8:03 PM
Points: 76, Visits: 230
Some time back (too long, alas) I presented a method for running R functions within the database engine (sql). Alas, this was done with Postgres and the PL/R extension. I could find none for SQL Server.

Since Joe Conway's PL/R is relatively little code, and attaches to the Postgres engine through its embedded C/C++ user defined function extension (while at the sql function level it's identified as R language, it's really just C to Postgres).

At the time, and ever since, I've been puzzled why other engines don't provide similar?? Joe's created PL/R pretty much in his spare time. Not to denigrate the effort, by any means, only to point out that a full-blown development team isn't needed to provide such a hook to a database engine. Where are the others?

Recently, Oracle has done so. It's kind of buried, at least to those of us not Oracle hounds. Here's a link: https://blogs.oracle.com/R/entry/analyzing_big_data_using_the1

You'll need to visit, since they've disabled copy/paste. Proprietary software!!

Come on Steve, get with it!! (The Steve in Redmond, just to be clear).
Post #1478960
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 123»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse