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Hiring Heterogeneously Expand / Collapse
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Posted Saturday, July 20, 2013 2:55 PM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Hiring Heterogeneously






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Posted Saturday, July 20, 2013 4:11 PM


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I found the opposite to be true in some cases. You really really need to be careful that you don't end up with a "Tower of Babel" when hiring Developers and Architects.

--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
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Post #1475777
Posted Saturday, July 20, 2013 5:15 PM


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The world is a richer place for the diversity we have, and varying opinions, thoughts and ideas. We don't all get along, but many of us can work together with mutual respect, considering each others' viewpoints as we work to build solutions to the problems we face.

Oh so true ... so true in more than just SQL Server


If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something.

Ron

Please help us, help you -before posting a question please read

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Post #1475785
Posted Monday, July 22, 2013 6:14 AM
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Hiring too many people that are too similar, who may think alike, who may view problems the same way can lead to an environment that doesn't grow and expand, that loses it's creativity over time.


I have lived through this at my last job. When I started we all had different approaches and thinking styles, though compatible, so as not to be a disaster. Productivity was high, every quarter someone came up with some new method or innovation which jumped the business process ahead leaps and bounds.

Over time every new hire was almost identical to the last, until the entire group was of one mind. Productivity dropped steeply, there were no new innovations to processes for several years at a time. The mantra quickly became, and I quote "If it can't be control+C'd it can't be done".
Post #1475976
Posted Monday, July 22, 2013 9:07 AM
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It can be frustrating to be the new person who comes in with new ideas and sees antiquated ways that can be changed. When you ask 'Why do you do it this way, when this way is faster, less time...? and prove that it is faster/better, you get the same answer again and again 'We've always done it this way.' and they won't change!

Christy

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Posted Monday, July 22, 2013 9:19 AM


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cksid (7/22/2013)
It can be frustrating to be the new person who comes in with new ideas and sees antiquated ways that can be changed. When you ask 'Why do you do it this way, when this way is faster, less time...? and prove that it is faster/better, you get the same answer again and again 'We've always done it this way.' and they won't change!

Christy



the trick here is to give reasons why, and show how others have already thought of these things. I've learned to appreciate the new person re-examining the problem, and if they can prove it's better, that's good. However by the same token, I have to be able to justify the current way to keep doing it.







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Post #1476072
Posted Monday, July 22, 2013 9:57 AM
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Steve Jones - SSC Editor (7/22/2013)
cksid (7/22/2013)
It can be frustrating to be the new person who comes in with new ideas and sees antiquated ways that can be changed. When you ask 'Why do you do it this way, when this way is faster, less time...? and prove that it is faster/better, you get the same answer again and again 'We've always done it this way.' and they won't change!

Christy



the trick here is to give reasons why, and show how others have already thought of these things. I've learned to appreciate the new person re-examining the problem, and if they can prove it's better, that's good. However by the same token, I have to be able to justify the current way to keep doing it.


cksid - It can be very frustrating and it can be a major rub to the new employee. However, one of the cardinal rules is that you don't fix what isn't broken. This is followed quickly with, However, when you are already changing something for another business reason then you can implement your new way of doing things.

So I agree with Steve that if the new solution can be proven better, implement it when the business dictates that process change. And let the new employee who found the new way of doing it be involved with the change. The one who finds the answer should be acknowledged as the source of the find, it is part of the recognition of a job well done.








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Post #1476102
Posted Monday, July 22, 2013 11:14 AM
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I'm a 60 year old unemployed person who enjoyed working in engineering. I can't break the habit of working. I create projects to work on. It was starting one of my projects that I saw would give me a chance to learn SLQ.

My two impression are SLQ is amazingly and deceptively simple. SQL shows how simple concepts evolve into something with much complexity. This is a natural quandary within SQL.

I enjoy working with and being around young people. I've seen how young people grow being around older workers. Older workers trend to level out emotional component in an organization. Too many older people get too hung up being in their comfort zone. They need their ideas to be questioned.

There is an natural order. The natural order is groups have more skills and experience to drew on to solve problems. Much experience is earned over time. The gift of youth is seeing opportunities in new ideas. Nothing feds creative people than being around a multitude of ideas and experience in an open environment where being difference is expected and like think is discouraged.
Post #1476156
Posted Tuesday, July 23, 2013 2:06 AM


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"Not everyone can be a superstar-expert-architect that decides how the system is built. Not all architects should spend time coding basic insert/update/delete code or adding clustered indexes to tables. We need a variety of talent levels that can get complete different types of tasks. There is tedious administrative work, supporting roles, necessary, though unexciting work like reviewing security, logs, audits, and more."

Are these talent levels or job choices? The person working on security is just as likely to be a superstar expert as the architect, or the lead developer who's right now adding clustered indexes to tables (because the choice of cluster keys is pivotal). Most of the devs I work with view architecture as "necessary, though unexciting"


“Write the query the simplest way. If through testing it becomes clear that the performance is inadequate, consider alternative query forms.” - Gail Shaw

For fast, accurate and documented assistance in answering your questions, please read this article.
Understanding and using APPLY, (I) and (II) Paul White
Hidden RBAR: Triangular Joins / The "Numbers" or "Tally" Table: What it is and how it replaces a loop Jeff Moden
Exploring Recursive CTEs by Example Dwain Camps
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Posted Tuesday, July 23, 2013 9:36 AM
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mikej 14403 (7/22/2013)
My two impressions are SLQ is amazingly and deceptively simple. SQL shows how simple concepts evolve into something with much complexity. This is a natural quandary within SQL.

Nothing feeds creative people more than being around a multitude of ideas and experience in an open environment where being different is expected and like think is discouraged.


Mike - Thanks for the insight, shared wisdom like this is wonderful and a light to those who are on the road to maturity in the field.

I agree that SQL is both simple and complex, and as with many other IT tools there are those who can bend it to do some very amazing things. The idea of "we have always done it this way" is only temporal. In reality we all have done things this way until there was reason to change, then we either changed or fossilized. But that choice is up to use as individuals.

But each choice to resist logical and valuable change costs many much more then they think.

Again I appreciate what you have said and look forward to your future contributions.

M.



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