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Data Philanthropy Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, July 18, 2013 12:23 PM
SSCrazy

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In the digital marketing space there are actually companies that you pay for the privilege of sharing your data! The idea is that by contributing to the identification of marketing segments your site becomes more attractive to paying advertisers. You give a little or receive a little or hopefully a lot.

The thing is data is an asset. An asset has value. You invest assets to acquire other assets.

If you are a retail chain who had a dataset identifying your store locations closest carparks to those locations then by making that data public you gamble that the benefit to your organisation is greater to you than the benefit to your competitors.

I've seen some really great examples of OData and some really imaginative uses for it.


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Post #1475167
Posted Thursday, July 18, 2013 8:01 PM
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Jim P. (7/18/2013)
Rafael A. Colón (7/17/2013)
Hi Steve:

I certainly like this idea however it also concerns me that data is a double edge blade it can be use for good or bad purposes depending on who have it. I'm not sure if the general public is ready to ride on this concept specially with the Snowden controversy happening right now. How the data will be handled and used is the imporant item in this proposal.


How many phone calls have you had for "cheap" trips to Vegas or from a Canadian Pharmacy? It got to the point I almost wanted to change my cell phone number I've had for over 10 years.

My name and cell number are practically public, what would they do with more private data?


Ah, but that is the catch. You don't own a cell number. The cell company owns it. If you transfer it to another carrier, it is still theirs to do with as they please. Think of how land lines were sold to you, then they sold the numbers to marketing companies, then they sold you call blocking, caller id, et cetera. None of these are necessary except to stop intrusions caused by the company that provides you the number!

Your name isn't yours either, because companies own their sales history, and the fact that your name bought it, and they can choose to sell it if they wish.



Dave
Post #1475248
Posted Thursday, July 18, 2013 8:20 PM


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djackson 22568 (7/18/2013)

Ah, but that is the catch. You don't own a cell number. The cell company owns it. If you transfer it to another carrier, it is still theirs to do with as they please. Think of how land lines were sold to you, then they sold the numbers to marketing companies, then they sold you call blocking, caller id, et cetera. None of these are necessary except to stop intrusions caused by the company that provides you the number!

Your name isn't yours either, because companies own their sales history, and the fact that your name bought it, and they can choose to sell it if they wish.


You are right, but humorously coincidental I had this e-mail in my inbox this morning:

July 18, 2013

Regarding Account Number: 9xxxxxxxxxxxxx

Dear Valued Customer,

We know your privacy is important, so we've made it a priority to talk to you about it. We're revising our Privacy Policy to make it easier to understand, and we want to point out two new programs that could help us and other businesses serve you better.

The first program will make reports available to businesses. These reports will contain anonymous information about groups of customers, such as how they collectively use our products and services. The second program will use local geography as a factor in delivering online and mobile ads to the people who might find them most useful.

As always, we follow important principles to keep your trust:

We are committed to protecting your privacy.
We provide you with privacy choices.
We will not sell information that identifies you to anyone, for any purpose. Period.
We are committed to listening and keeping you informed about how we protect your privacy.

The two new programs are described in this notice, including your privacy choices for each. You can also read the new and old versions of our privacy policy at att.com/privacy.

To provide feedback on the new policy, please write us in the next 30 days at privacyfeedback@att.com or AT&T Privacy Policy, 1120 20th Street NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20036.

Sincerely,

Robert W. Quinn Jr.
AT&T
Senior Vice President - Federal Regulatory & Chief Privacy Officer


But I'm sure my data is still being fed to the NSA.




----------------
Jim P.

A little bit of this and a little byte of that can cause bloatware.
Post #1475252
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