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Need a way of estimating the number of users accessing SQL Expand / Collapse
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Posted Wednesday, June 5, 2013 8:05 AM
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Currently we're using SQL Server 2005. We're looking to upgrade to SQL Server 2012, but the biggest issue is the licensing cost and how to estimate it. As I understand it, you can purchase CALS or license by core. Licensing by cores is, I believe much more expensive than we need, because we don't have that many users. At most I estimate we could have as many as 50 simultaneous users, but likely that will be smaller than that. The machine we're going to be putting this onto (actually, a VM) is a 4 core machine, so licensing cores is way more expensive, than licensing by users/devices, given our scenario.

However, that still gets me back to asking how many users do we have using the system at once? How can I estimate that with our current SQL Server 2005 database?


Kindest Regards,

Rod
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Post #1460245
Posted Wednesday, June 5, 2013 9:29 AM
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SQL server CALs are not for concurrent users.

You need a CAL for each user or client that accesses SQL Server either directly or indirectly via a middle tier application.

Post #1460281
Posted Wednesday, June 5, 2013 10:27 AM
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Michael Valentine Jones (6/5/2013)
SQL server CALs are not for concurrent users.

You need a CAL for each user or client that accesses SQL Server either directly or indirectly via a middle tier application.



Michael, do you mean we have to have a CAL for each and every user that may access it, even if no one is accessing the database at all?


Kindest Regards,

Rod
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Post #1460323
Posted Wednesday, June 5, 2013 11:26 AM
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Rod at work (6/5/2013)
Michael Valentine Jones (6/5/2013)
SQL server CALs are not for concurrent users.

You need a CAL for each user or client that accesses SQL Server either directly or indirectly via a middle tier application.



Michael, do you mean we have to have a CAL for each and every user that may access it, even if no one is accessing the database at all?


You need a CAL for each user who accesses a SQL Server. If someone connects once per week to look at a single report, they need a CAL.



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