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Posted Monday, June 3, 2013 12:43 PM
Grasshopper

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Gary Varga (6/3/2013)
Whilst I agree in part with dtinney, my biggest issue was that serious inroads were being made but at some point we did another u-turn.


I should have noted my agreement with this statement as well. Late 90's, Rational RUP, full SDLC, hierarchy of design responsibility, testing methodologies evolving - including UI testing, maturing application deployment platforms...

Then we are blessed with free software, open source, Internet repositories, code sharing - all empowering programming for the masses.

But the biggest factor in my estimation was the emergence of the browser as the application deployment platform, brand new infrastructure element with support for scripting and requiring a completely new set of coding tools. Programming went back to text editors and script, hacking HTML and Java to get what the platform couldn't do out of the box, emerging issues of session, web site data repositories, data ownership... followed by evolution of application service frameworks so we're dealing with loss of core functionality and then a rapid evolution of capabilities which completely negated the benefit of design. By the time you architected a solution the framework had evolved past it.

2 steps forward for deployment and user experience, one step back for structured programming.

Cheers,
Derek.
Post #1459433
Posted Monday, June 3, 2013 1:34 PM


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dtinney (6/3/2013)
Gary Varga (6/3/2013)
Whilst I agree in part with dtinney, my biggest issue was that serious inroads were being made but at some point we did another u-turn.


I should have noted my agreement with this statement as well. Late 90's, Rational RUP, full SDLC, hierarchy of design responsibility, testing methodologies evolving - including UI testing, maturing application deployment platforms...

Then we are blessed with free software, open source, Internet repositories, code sharing - all empowering programming for the masses.

But the biggest factor in my estimation was the emergence of the browser as the application deployment platform, brand new infrastructure element with support for scripting and requiring a completely new set of coding tools. Programming went back to text editors and script, hacking HTML and Java to get what the platform couldn't do out of the box, emerging issues of session, web site data repositories, data ownership... followed by evolution of application service frameworks so we're dealing with loss of core functionality and then a rapid evolution of capabilities which completely negated the benefit of design. By the time you architected a solution the framework had evolved past it.

2 steps forward for deployment and user experience, one step back for structured programming.

Cheers,
Derek.


All very good points. A good round up in my opinion.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1459443
Posted Tuesday, June 4, 2013 9:05 AM


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Well after visiting the science museum in London and having been in Paris at the Louvre two weeks prior I ironically noted that the Sumerians who lived 4500 years ago and who recorded things in cunieform on clay tablets appeared to have had greater consistency and rigour to their financial records than some of the institutions that I have worked for…
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Posted Tuesday, June 4, 2013 12:55 PM
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Jim P. (6/3/2013)
phonetictalk (6/3/2013)

My Netflix homepage is a dozen preschool shows (Sesame Street, Dr Seuss movies, Leap Frog, Curious George, Disney, Thomas) followed by "critically-acclaimed violent movies" including Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs. Hmmm.


I don't know about Netflix, but on Amazon there is the "Why was this recommended" link. If you click on that it brings up a list of stuff that was looked at or bought by whoever has been accessing the account. You can mark stuff to not matter and it changes the whole listing when you do searches. For example I bought stuff for my nephews for Christmas that I would never normally care about. So I went in and took that out and all the juvenile stuff went away.



I have noticed that Amazon always seems to recommend the last thing I bought, like I might want to buy another wall clock, garlic press, or pressure cooker because one is just not enough.



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