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Posted Wednesday, May 22, 2013 4:18 AM


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I am at the whim of my clients. I can recommend, request as well as try to cajole but at the end of the day I am often not allowed to install software and certainly not allowed to create data repositories. The good news is that the vast majority of clients have used some form of version control for a long time now. I have often disliked the systems or practices employed but they are always better than nothing (and lets face it sometimes dislike doesn't mean they are wrong )

Worst case scenario, I use a similar file scheme to Steve's (probably like most other people).


Gaz

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Post #1455407
Posted Wednesday, May 22, 2013 6:13 AM
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Is anyone using Continuous Integration with their Source Control solution?

Unit testing?
Post #1455446
Posted Wednesday, May 22, 2013 6:49 AM


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I have used Continuous Integration (CI) before and wholeheartedly recommend it.

Currently applying Test Driven Development (TDD) and recommend it too.


Gaz

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Post #1455468
Posted Wednesday, May 22, 2013 7:18 AM
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We use VSS, and I'm in the minority of team that advocates it. I know there are better options, but I don't want to open that can of worms. The first sub-team I was on avoided using it, we just kept the two versions in regular disk space. When that manager changed, I checked that code in.

In the past, I have been a team of one, and I used VSS. If no other reason, the ability to take two versions and instantly find differences is invaluable.
Post #1455490
Posted Thursday, May 23, 2013 10:58 AM


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Nadrek (5/20/2013)
For those using a "real" version control system: When was the last time you tested a restore of one of your CVS backups?


Excellent point.







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Post #1456110
Posted Monday, June 17, 2013 3:25 PM


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I've used a variety of version control systems over the years, including a couple of home-rolled ones back in the days when there were no useful version control systems. Most version control systems are horribly flawed in that they make no attempt to integrate version control and configuration control. When each developer is responsible for his own chunk of code (so that the semaphore effect of checkin/checkout is irrelevant) a very simple version control system is fine provided it hooks onto some sort of configuration control. For projects with fewer than about 30 developers, complex checkin/checkout can be just a pain - it may be better to work with a t-card system on an array of slots on a wall somewhere (open plan offices and low-wall cubicles have of course reduced the available wall-space so in many places the T-card version of checkin-checkout can't work). For really cooperative development (where the checkout semaphore is multi-pass) some sort of merge process is needed with checkin, and although there are several attempts out there to automate that I would rather do what I did back in the early days - have human beings handle the merge (with the aid of tools designed to help them, of course).
In my first job, we had no version control - and it didn't seem to do any harm; but we were doing research, not development. I left that job at the end of March 1969. In my second job I invented my own version control, because as well as research I was doing some development. after that there was always some sort of version control, although it varied from being a component of a very feature-rich development environment, ICL's CADES to something very simple like VSS. In my last permanent job, when I joined the company (2002) it used VSS for all C++, some JS, all HTML, and nothing at all for SQL or Flash. The only way to discover the current schema was to log in to one of the customer sites and get it to script every database - you had to know which customer had the latest version, but as there were only two customers at the time that wasn't too hard; I changed that rather quickly.


Tom
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