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Zettabytes and Beyond Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 12:09 AM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Zettabytes and Beyond






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Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #1433598
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 3:16 AM


Old Hand

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To paraphrase ...
Data is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly hugely mind-bogglingly big it is.



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I'm not paid to solve problems. I'm paid to prevent them.
Post #1433648
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 3:45 AM


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What would the next stage up from VLDB be - BHDB*?












*Bloody huge database


-------------------------------
Posting Data Etiquette - Jeff Moden
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There are naive questions, tedious questions, ill-phrased questions, questions put after inadequate self-criticism. But every question is a cry to understand (the world). There is no such thing as a dumb question. ― Carl Sagan
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Post #1433671
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 4:59 AM
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What we call "data" is different nowadays. I never used to consider my large collection of vinyl LPs and cassettes, or my printed photographs, as somehow containing multiple GB of data. But my music and pictures now take up the vast majority of the storage on my home PC.

In some part of my brain, I still consider "data" and "media" to be different; and I keep a relatively small amount of what I'd consider to be "data".
Post #1433713
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 5:06 AM


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What I'd like to know is how much the sum of human knowledge has grown in the same time.

As we all know, data isn't useful to us as such; it only becomes so once analysed, and at that point it's information, not data. Back in the 90s, many computer pros used to work in Data Processing, and once our field changed to Information Technology, we often got quite touchy if the old term was used. Now, with the sheer scale of the amount of data being produced, I wonder if we're in danger of forgetting the value of information and and accidentally sliding back to a data processing role. Probably not, but it gets me thinking nonetheless....

Oh, and I think I'll coin the acronym FONBDB as the successor to VLDB, but all things considered I don't think I'll elaborate on its meaning


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Post #1433716
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 7:37 AM


Old Hand

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I'm more a fan of keeping only what you need and either archiving or purging the rest. When it comes to music and pictures I still favor objects I can hold in my hand. I have a rather large CD collection that I have no plans to port to MPx format and I've found that digital photos actually end up being shoot and forget you have it. Of course it is convenient to have all your pictures on a laptop and be able to browse them but for me it can't replace the enjoyment of looking at old photo albums found in a closet every couple of years.

Cheers
Post #1433783
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 7:43 AM


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majorbloodnock (3/21/2013)
What I'd like to know is how much the sum of human knowledge has grown in the same time.
. . .

Good point.

How percentage of total data consists of the following?
denormalized table design, improper data types, markup tags, duplicate data, replicated data, indexes (both used and not used), unfilled pages, table fragmentation, temp space, transaction log space, etc.

Even after eliminating all of the above, a huge percentage of actual data that's left consists of digital junkfood like email spam, cat videos, and pornography. There are even some companies that accumulate TB of data recording things like web page visits and mouse clicks.

I guess it could eventually becomes usable information for someone, but the total size of our collective databases are hardly a benchmark for measuring the ever expanding body of human knowledge.
Post #1433785
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 8:33 AM
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Point of order: in 1983, 30 years ago, we were using 1.2MB 5.25" DS floppies, and 720KB 3.5" DS floppies.

1.44MB floppies didn't show up until 1986, so they're only 27 years old.

8" floppies, now, that's where it was at!
Post #1433815
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 8:45 AM


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In a practical sense, it doesn't matter if it's cat videos or anything else. We still need to manage the data, which means work for us in the data business. Businesses are finding more ways to capture data, arguably lots of which isn't useful or important, but we must still deal with it.






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Post #1433828
Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 9:00 AM


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Eric M Russell (3/21/2013)
majorbloodnock (3/21/2013)
What I'd like to know is how much the sum of human knowledge has grown in the same time.
. . .

Good point.

How percentage of total data consists of the following?
denormalized table design, improper data types, markup tags, duplicate data, replicated data, indexes (both used and not used), unfilled pages, table fragmentation, temp space, transaction log space, etc.

Even after eliminating all of the above, a huge percentage of actual data that's left consists of digital junkfood like email spam, cat videos, and pornography. There are even some companies that accumulate TB of data recording things like web page visits and mouse clicks.

I guess it could eventually becomes usable information for someone, but the total size of our collective databases are hardly a benchmark for measuring the ever expanding body of human knowledge.

I recall more than a few nights spent in front of the TV with Seinfeld and M*A*S*H, a shoebox full single sided 5.25 diskettes, notching a little hole in the corner of each one, and re-formatting them my new double density drive.
Post #1433842
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