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Question about DBA authority versus responsibility Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, March 11, 2013 8:05 AM


SSCrazy

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Thanks again, everyone.

In this case, it turns out this database supports official software that needs to be supported from the systems side as well, and I met with my colleagues and confirmed in writing that that software vendor is taking responsibility for the SQL Server configuration. However, I will also be invited to meetings pertaining to the software so I know what's going on. At least now I will have a chance to discuss with the vendor, at the meeting, what I did to ensure the basic health of the server and what if anything they recommend to change.

I'm happy with the outcome, but I will be reviewing this with my boss to ensure that as much as possible we are made aware of software that requires SQL while those decisions are being made, not after they're installed and have trouble.

Thanks again,
webrunner


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"A SQL query walks into a bar and sees two tables. He walks up to them and says 'Can I join you?'"
Ref.: http://tkyte.blogspot.com/2009/02/sql-joke.html
Post #1429280
Posted Monday, March 11, 2013 2:56 PM
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Four years ago I was in a Data Admin group that got tired of being called to fix problems in these rogue installs. The Manager got a bright idea and started charging back their time to the development/business group. Once the business-line VP's started seeing very expensive DBA time showing on their monthly cost sheets, the CIO got calls and before long those old systems (one was SQL2000!) were brought up to current specs and the servers were placed under the Data group care. Problems tended to taper off once that happened...
Post #1429486
Posted Monday, March 11, 2013 3:02 PM


SSCrazy

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ACinKC (3/11/2013)
Four years ago I was in a Data Admin group that got tired of being called to fix problems in these rogue installs. The Manager got a bright idea and started charging back their time to the development/business group. Once the business-line VP's started seeing very expensive DBA time showing on their monthly cost sheets, the CIO got calls and before long those old systems (one was SQL2000!) were brought up to current specs and the servers were placed under the Data group care. Problems tended to taper off once that happened...


Nice. Thanks for that tip. I will keep it mind. I don't think we have chargebacks that work that way with hours within our department, but I can do something similar by tracking the requests that come in and the hours of my time that they would take up. Something that lets management know that the SQL maintenance for these servers isn't just taking care of itself.

Thanks again,
webrunner


-------------------
"Operator! Give me the number for 911!" - Homer Simpson

"A SQL query walks into a bar and sees two tables. He walks up to them and says 'Can I join you?'"
Ref.: http://tkyte.blogspot.com/2009/02/sql-joke.html
Post #1429488
Posted Thursday, March 14, 2013 2:48 AM
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I have been supporting MSSQL now for 17 years, and have come across this issue many, many times.
I usually follow the following process:

1. Fix the problem.
2. Install monitoring / alerting processes to warn/fix issues should they occur again.
3. Advise that the systems should 'really' be supported by my group.
4. Provide a report of findings, highlighting where 'gross errors' were made due to not being implemented / administered by individuals skilled in database administration.
5. Leave it at that. If they are really THAT concerned about failing systems, they will see that correct support as advised is necessary, and allow you to maintain any other systems.

You can't be expected to do much more than above, and the report is a great 'get out of jail free' card, advising on issues and offering support.
Post #1430817
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