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Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 7:46 AM


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I completely agree with Gary, it depends on the culture, particularly if you work for the government. They look at this a whole different way. For example, once I found a major problem with a system that I found totally on my own investigation. When i brought this up to my superiors in a meeting, the first question I was asked was "Who requested you to do this, and what is the ticket number?" I then replied "No one requested it, I found it through proactive research." One manager then replied "That is not the way we do things here. There must be a request from someone for all work done and a work order attached to it, since all of our hours have to be billed to someone or some department. We just can't go out and find problems on our own. The goverment sector does not work that way." I then replied "Oh, then that explains why the government is in the current shape it is in" That remark was met with complete silence. I was flabbergasted but after thinking about it awhile, that is exactly how our government works nowadays. Inefficiency at its best. It's no wonder the country today is broke and upside down. Look at the philosphy of the bozos that are running the show!

"Technology is a weird thing. It brings you great gifts with one hand, and it stabs you in the back with the other. ..."
Post #1420073
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 7:55 AM


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TravisDBA (2/14/2013)
I completely agree with Gary, it depends on the culture, particularly if you work for the government. They look at this a whole different way. For example, once I found a major problem with a system that I found totally on my own investigation. When i brought this up to my superiors in a meeting, the first question I was asked was "Who requested you to do this, and what is the ticket number?" I then replied "No one requested it, I found it through proactive research." One manager then replied "That is not the way we do things here. There must be a request from someone for all work done and a work order attached to it, since all of our hours have to be billed to someone or some department. We just can't go out and find problems on our own. The goverment sector does not work that way." I then replied "Oh, then that explains why the government is in the current shape it is in" That remark was met with complete silence. I was flabbergasted but after thinking about it awhile, that is exactly how our government works nowadays. Inefficiency at its best. It's no wonder the country today is broke and upside down. Look at the philosphy of the bozos that are running the show!

LOL! The only way to change governement's mind about anything is in the voting booth.
Post #1420083
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 8:00 AM
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Nice article. For years now I've considered myself a creative problem solver who happens to work in the IT space.
Post #1420089
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 8:18 AM


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Eric M Russell (2/14/2013)
TravisDBA (2/14/2013)
I completely agree with Gary, it depends on the culture, particularly if you work for the government. They look at this a whole different way. For example, once I found a major problem with a system that I found totally on my own investigation. When i brought this up to my superiors in a meeting, the first question I was asked was "Who requested you to do this, and what is the ticket number?" I then replied "No one requested it, I found it through proactive research." One manager then replied "That is not the way we do things here. There must be a request from someone for all work done and a work order attached to it, since all of our hours have to be billed to someone or some department. We just can't go out and find problems on our own. The goverment sector does not work that way." I then replied "Oh, then that explains why the government is in the current shape it is in" That remark was met with complete silence. I was flabbergasted but after thinking about it awhile, that is exactly how our government works nowadays. Inefficiency at its best. It's no wonder the country today is broke and upside down. Look at the philosphy of the bozos that are running the show!

LOL! The only way to change governement's mind about anything is in the voting booth.


I only wish that were true. No exclamation marks. No smilies.

Unfortunately for a change to occur from the voting booth it requires that there be options on the ballot paper that would instigate change. Here in the UK I remain unconvinced.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1420108
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 9:58 AM
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john.martin 5194 (2/14/2013)
Please do reflect on this:

Let's be creators
not prbolem solvers.


John,

Reflected and rejected! Not that I reject being creative, if you have read the post of the past you will find I have supported the creative side of this industry for over four decades. But I would also reject that we should be problem solvers and not creators.

In this industry we have to be both. I think what Steve was getting to was that we supply the creative solution to simple and complex problems and that skill is imperative to success, and is highly sought after as a job skill. And I agree with him completely.

You know this but I have to say it to make the point. You can create an excellent system that is highly creative and really slick on the backend with the best processing and database structure. And you can employ the latest bells and whistles in such a creative way that other skilled technicians marvel at the entire thing. But if the intended user looks at it and asks what does it do? And they cannot use it, you have been creative and have solved nothing. Your creation lays idle.

Many in the past have echoed the idea that we are scientists and as such we analyze, visualize, speculate, prove, and apply. In short we are applying the science of IT to processes and problems to make solutions possible or easier.

In this there is a huge demand for creativity, but there must be the ability to visualize, understand, and solve business problems or the work is only imperical, and theoretical.

Einstein use to be able to visualize the flows of data and processes as waves of light in a multi-dimential universe. And he would play those waves like music in his mind until he found harmony, thus a solution. This type of abstract reasoning and problem solving is crucial to our industry but we also have to be able to visualize what others have done before us and how they were thinking to be able to find the problems they missed and to build on their efforts.

So I reject the idea of one and not the other. We have to have the creative and the problem solving.


Not all gray hairs are Dinosaurs!
Post #1420170
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 10:19 AM


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Miles Neale (2/14/2013)
john.martin 5194 (2/14/2013)
Please do reflect on this:

Let's be creators
not prbolem solvers.


John,

Reflected and rejected! Not that I reject being creative, if you have read the post of the past you will find I have supported the creative side of this industry for over four decades. But I would also reject that we should be problem solvers and not creators.

In this industry we have to be both. I think what Steve was getting to was that we supply the creative solution to simple and complex problems and that skill is imperative to success, and is highly sought after as a job skill. And I agree with him completely.

You know this but I have to say it to make the point. You can create an excellent system that is highly creative and really slick on the backend with the best processing and database structure. And you can employ the latest bells and whistles in such a creative way that other skilled technicians marvel at the entire thing. But if the intended user looks at it and asks what does it do? And they cannot use it, you have been creative and have solved nothing. Your creation lays idle.

Many in the past have echoed the idea that we are scientists and as such we analyze, visualize, speculate, prove, and apply. In short we are applying the science of IT to processes and problems to make solutions possible or easier.

In this there is a huge demand for creativity, but there must be the ability to visualize, understand, and solve business problems or the work is only imperical, and theoretical.

Einstein use to be able to visualize the flows of data and processes as waves of light in a multi-dimential universe. And he would play those waves like music in his mind until he found harmony, thus a solution. This type of abstract reasoning and problem solving is crucial to our industry but we also have to be able to visualize what others have done before us and how they were thinking to be able to find the problems they missed and to build on their efforts.

So I reject the idea of one and not the other. We have to have the creative and the problem solving.


I concur.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1420185
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 10:32 AM
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i am not saying we are not problem solvers.

I am saying that problem solving is part of the journey in order to create something worthwhile.

I see problem solving as a subset.

When I approach life I ask myself what are we trying to create.
This assists to prioritise what I tackle.

If I see that solving problems is not trying to overcome an obstacle, but rather a step in the creation of something, my creativity and vigour are much more engaged!
Post #1420195
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 10:36 AM


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TravisDBA (2/14/2013)
"We just can't go out and find problems on our own. The goverment sector does not work that way." I then replied "Oh, then that explains why the government is in the current shape it is in"

LOL this reminds me of a famous quote from a few years ago from the mayor of Cleveland:
"The problem is we have a problem. It's not that we don't know what the problems are; we've known those for years. It's not that we don't know what the solutions are; we've known those for years. The problem is we haven't done anything about it."
Post #1420197
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 10:40 AM
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john.martin 5194 (2/14/2013)
i am not saying we are not problem solvers.

I am saying that problem solving is part of the journey in order to create something worthwhile.

I see problem solving as a subset.

When I approach life I ask myself what are we trying to create.
This assists to prioritise what I tackle.

If I see that solving problems is not trying to overcome an obstacle, but rather a step in the creation of something, my creativity and vigour are much more engaged!


John,

There is much to agree within this post. And this is well said.

And I greatly appreciate the statement "what WE are trying to create." Finding a problem in an existing system and solving that problem we find that we are joining with the originator of the solution and recreating the solution into a more correct one. As you have found we cannot always start everything from scratch, we stand on the work of others and make it into a better solution.

Thank you!


Not all gray hairs are Dinosaurs!
Post #1420200
Posted Thursday, February 14, 2013 10:59 AM
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While I agree with Steve that we are "problem solvers" (and per the discussion board, creative ones at that), I disagree somewhat with some of his other statements. While managers may not be interested in hearing the root of the problem while the system is down, the moment you bring it back up they DO want to know what happened, and more importantly how you will prevent it from ever occurring again.

Unfortunately, managers often want to avoid funding the actual solution. For instance if you have a server running out of disk space, you'll get nickled and dimed to the nth degree with "can't you just remove some of the data to free up space" instead of getting a budget to asses the actual need for space and bring in the additional hardware to allow for growth. (We hope your company is growing if your space is! )

I've experienced most of what others have already addressed.
- I help create solutions to business needs
- I help resolve problems when they occur
- I attempt to pro-actively provide solutions to upcoming issues
- I get called "negative" if I point out a problem that's likely to occur, regardless of how many solutions I bring to the table
- I get called "negative" if I point out the risks of following a particular path (some managers really don't understand risk evaluation and risk management)
- The relative force of the "negative" appellation appears to be in direct proportion to the cost of the proposed solutions
- I'm not supposed to work on anything without a ticket. (However, I can create my own tickets )

Fortunately, I don't work for the government. I applied back in my younger days and was rejected; my counselor told me it was because I was too smart. "The hiring managers won't hire you because you'd have their job in six months." I never did learn to dumb down the applications; I think now that was a very good decision.



Here there be dragons...,

Steph Brown
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